Shades of People

Shades of People

5.0 2
by Shelley Rotner, Sheila M. Kelly
     
 
Cocoa, tan, rose, and almond-people come in lots of shades, even in the same family. This exploration of one of our most noticeable physical traits uses vibrant photographs of childen and a short text to inspire young children both to take notice and to look beyond the obvious.

Overview

Cocoa, tan, rose, and almond-people come in lots of shades, even in the same family. This exploration of one of our most noticeable physical traits uses vibrant photographs of childen and a short text to inspire young children both to take notice and to look beyond the obvious.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Filled with wonderful photographs....A good introduction to racial and ethnic diversity."

"Beautiful....Message-driven but charming, this will enrich and spark discussions of diversity."

Children's Literature - Carlee Hallman
Clear photographs of children's faces show a variety of shades of skin in families, at school, at the playground, in parks, at the beach, and in the city. "There's creamy, ivory, coffee, cocoa, copper and tan." A dark skinned boy paints a picture of a person at school and is not sure what color to make the skin. "Our skin is just our covering, like wrapping paper. And you can't tell what someone is like from the color of their skin." The photographs of smiling, healthy children of all hues getting along with each other and being friends make the point, along with the simple text. The book ends: "In the world, there's light and dark, and everything in between." The photograph shows children of various skin shades running together across a field of grass filled with clover. Parents, teachers, and children will enjoy looking at these pictures and talking about them. Reviewer: Carlee Hallman
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—This book is filled with wonderful photographs of happy, smiling, inquisitive, trusting, and adorable children—all with varying skin tones, hair colors and textures, and facial features. "Have you noticed that people come in many different shades?" is the opening sentence, accompanied by framed head shots of youngsters. It is followed on the next page by, "Not colors, exactly, but shades." The text is minimal, with approximately 3 to 10 words per page. The last page features a large photograph of eight little hands of varying shades. The message is clear and to the point: "Our skin is just our covering, like wrapping paper. And, you can't tell what someone is like from the color of their skin." A good introduction to racial and ethnic diversity.—Mary N. Oluonye, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH
Kirkus Reviews
Author and photographer join forces again in this photographic essay on skin color. Having previously tackled family members, feelings and faiths (May Ways: How Families Practice Their Beliefs and Religions, 2006, etc.), they now showcase-in full color-many smiling, appealing, friendly, loving, creative, thoughtful, hugging, eye-catching young ones. The connection, rather than the difference, is that all these children are many different shades, "not colors, exactly . . . . / There's creamy, ivory, / sandy and peach, / coffee, cocoa, / copper and tan." And all of this is "our covering, like wrapping paper." The authors take care to state explicitly that "you can't tell what someone is like from the color of their skin." Children of many different ethnicities are here, sometimes in the same family. It's a heartwarming effort that teachers and families can embrace and will doubtless find its way into many a curriculum on celebrating difference. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780823423057
Publisher:
Holiday House, Inc.
Publication date:
06/28/2010
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
379,477
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Sheila M. Kelly is a clinical psychologist who has collaborated with Shelley Rotner on other books, including Shades of People, which was an ALA Notable Book for Children. A native of Saskatchewan, Canada, she now lives in Austin, Texas.

Shelley Rotner brings a depth of experience and knowledge to her books with a diverse background as an elementary school teacher, museum educational specialist and UNICEF photographer. She is an award winning author and photo-illustrator of over twenty books. She lives in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Shades of People 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book to continually read to my three-year old, but also my older children because it shows the diversity of various ethnicities. We do not associate each ethnicity to a color, because in reality, we aren't any solid color, we're humans made up of different shades and no two shades of people are identical! This book introduces this and racial diversity to the young mind but also reminds our mature minds reading it, that we are ALL beautiful SHADES of PEOPLE!