Shadow: Five Presidents And The Legacy Of Watergate [NOOK Book]

Overview

Twenty-five years ago, after Richard Nixon resigned the presidency, Gerald Ford promised a return to normalcy. "My fellow Americans, our long national nightmare is over," President Ford declared.

But it was not. The Watergate scandal, and the remedies against future abuses of power, would have an enduring impact on presidents and the country. In Shadow, Bob Woodward takes us deep into the administrations of Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton to describe how each discovered ...

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Shadow: Five Presidents And The Legacy Of Watergate

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Overview

Twenty-five years ago, after Richard Nixon resigned the presidency, Gerald Ford promised a return to normalcy. "My fellow Americans, our long national nightmare is over," President Ford declared.

But it was not. The Watergate scandal, and the remedies against future abuses of power, would have an enduring impact on presidents and the country. In Shadow, Bob Woodward takes us deep into the administrations of Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton to describe how each discovered that the presidency was forever altered. With special emphasis on the human toll, Woodward shows the consequences of the new ethics laws, and the emboldened Congress and media. Powerful investigations increasingly stripped away the privacy and protections once expected by the nation's chief executive.

Using presidential documents, diaries, prosecutorial records and hundreds of interviews with firsthand witnesses, Woodward chronicles how all five men failed first to understand and then to manage the inquisitorial environment.

"The mood was mean," Gerald Ford says. Woodward explains how Ford believed he had been offered a deal to pardon Nixon, then clumsily rejected it and later withheld all the details from Congress and the public, leaving lasting suspicions that compromised his years in the White House.

Jimmy Carter used Watergate to win an election, and then watched in bewilderment as the rules of strict accountability engulfed his budget director, Bert Lance, and challenged his own credibility. From his public pronouncements to the Iranian hostage crisis, Carter never found the decisive, healing style of leadership the first elected post-Watergate president had promised.

Woodward also provides the first behind-the-scenes account of how President Reagan and a special team of more than 60 attorneys and archivists beat Iran-contra. They turned the Reagan White House and United States intelligence agencies upside down investigating the president with orders to disclose any incriminating information they found. A fresh portrait of an engaged Reagan emerges as he realizes his presidency is in peril and attempts to prove his innocence.

In Shadow, a bitter and disoriented President Bush routinely pours out his anger at the permanent scandal culture to his personal diary as a dozen investigations touch some of those closest to him. At one point, Bush pounds a plastic mallet on his Oval Office desk because of the continuing investigation of Iran-contra Independent Counsel Lawrence Walsh. "Take that, Walsh!" he shouts. "I'd like to get rid of this guy." Woodward also reveals why Bush avoided telling one of the remaining secrets of the Gulf War.

The second half of Shadow focuses on President Clinton's scandals. Woodward shows how and why Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr's investigation became a state of permanent war with the Clintons. He reveals who Clinton really feared in the Paula Jones case, and the behind-the-scenes maneuvering and ruthless, cynical legal strategies to protect the Clintons. Shadow also describes how impeachment affected Clinton's war decisions and scarred his life, his marriage and his presidency. "How can I go on?" First Lady Hillary Clinton asked in 1996, when she was under scrutiny by Starr and the media, two years before the Lewinsky scandal broke. "How can I?"

Shadow is an authoritative, unsettling narrative of the modern, beleaguered presidency.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review

Twenty-five years ago, a president, shoulders bent as if crushed by the burden of his office, gave the victory sign as he boarded a helicopter that took him away from the position he had so desperately tried to hang on to. His term brought to an abrupt end by two brash young reporters for The Washington Post, President Nixon had resigned rather than face impeachment and a trial.

Now one of those reporters traces the influence of this cataclysmic event on the presidencies that followed. Bob Woodward, who has written extensively on the presidencies of Clinton (The Agenda, The Choice), Bush (The Commanders), and Reagan (Veil), as well as on Dan Quayle (Dan Quayle: The Man Who Would Be President) and the Supreme Court (The Brethren), analyzes the long reach of Watergate in Shadow: Five Presidents and the Legacy of Watergate. Using his standard you-are-there technique, Woodward paints a detailed study of crucial points in the five administrations in which "the honesty and truthfulness of the presidents and those closest to them were challenged," asking: "Could another president be a criminal? Did presidents talk and plot in private like Nixon? Would another president have to resign?"

The great lessons learned too late in each presidency are the constant analysis of each presidential act, the inquisitorial scrutiny of each president's credibility, the undertone of mistrust that every president must now prove himself against. Woodward views defining events of each presidency through the lens of Watergate:Ford'spardon of Nixon; Carter's aloof personality coupled with his impossible promise that he would (unlike certain of his predecessors) always tell the truth; the Iran-contra investigation during Reagan's administration; George Bush's staunch support of Clarence Thomas and the war with Iraq (not to mention questions surrounding his own involvement with Iran-contra); and Clinton's impeachment. Woodward devotes half the book to the Clinton administration.

How is it that after an event like Watergate, each succeeding presidency is plagued by scandal after scandal? How is it that a president could have been impeached? Why did none of these presidents appear to learn much of consequence from Nixon's political demise? Woodward posits what he calls "the myth of the big-time president" — that each president strives for an administration of legendary proportions. In Woodward's words, there is a "longing for someone with heroic energy, someone who can take the air out of a room, who can define an era worth living in." That this is not possible in post-Nixon America is something no one appears to be able to accept. Least of all those who are running for office.

Talk10
Finally, you can stop hearing about it and read the thing: "Bennett next asked about Lewinsky. 'Not a problem,' the president said. Bennett pressed. Clinton reminded his attorney that the problems were in the past. 'I'm retired,' he repeated. 'I'm retired.'"
James Poniewozik
Shadow states correctly, if hardly revealingly, that Watergate yielded a permanent scandal culture, but more practically it also created the independent-counsel statue and reinvigorated congressional inquiries. With Shadow, Woodward tries to adapt to this situation by morphing into a political analyst, examining how Presidents Ford through Clinton have failed to learn from Watergate. And here's the problem, Bob Woodward is a facts guy, not an analysis guy: His forte is getting the inside story giving high-placed, otherwise uncooperative sources a shoulder to leak on.

But the result in Shadow is a deeply unanalytical analysis really, a standard Woodward you-were-there narrative, offering dramatic private conversations and Beltway intrigues, seasoned with a few drips of Sunday-pundit wisdom so familar by now they probably appear in third-grade textbooks.
Fortune

Michael Lind
If the White House forms one vertex of a trianglethe other two corners are made up of news outlets and enemies of the Presidentfrom Congressional partisans to White House malcontents..... Despite their disagreements on other mattersthe five Presidents Woodward discusses probably would agree with a sentiment he attributes to Clinton in an anguished conversation with his adviser Dick Morris: "They want their own President they can hang." —The New York Times Book Review
Library Journal
In this best seller, veteran Washington Post reporter Woodward traces the impact that President Nixon's Watergate scandal has had on his five successors. Woodward presents an introduction, and then reader James Naughton takes over in a youthful voice somewhat similar to the author's own. Woodward's argument is that the fallout from the Watergate scandal has changed the political climate in Washington and affected both incumbents and candidates in various ways. Gerald Ford, for example, found his incumbency tarred by the pardon he issued Nixon, and many believe he lost the election for that reason; Jimmy Carter felt compelled to say that he would never lie to the American people and was embarrassed when he could not sustain the fiction; Ronald Reagan was unaffected until the Iran-contra scandal broke; George Bush seemed unaware that the media could turn on him once Desert Storm was behind him and could not handle the results; and Bill Clinton entered scandal after scandal and made many of the same errors of dissimulation that Nixon did and barely survived, being only the second president in history to be impeached. The common thread throughout these years was, in part, the altered attitude of the press, which at one time overlooked behaviors that now are the targets of aggressive investigative reporting. Presidential privacy in particular has faded with the times, and Woodward describes its continued erosion. Students of modern politics should find this presentation engaging. The author's persona is so authoritative and his knowledge of the subjects so deep that the listener learns a great deal. For public library and undergraduate collections.--Don Wismer, Cary Memorial Lib., Wayne, ME Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Walter Goodman
His theme consists of Presidential lapses....The lesson is that if you expect kindly treatment at Mr. Woodward's hands, be forthcoming in interviews....[The book comprises] Washington anecdotes, opinions and persiflage....When the material is not recooked, it tends toward gossip...
The New York Times
James Poniewozik
...[A] standard Woodward you-were-there narrative, offering dramatic private conversations and Beltway intrigues, seasoned with a few drops of Sunday-pundit wisdom...
Fortune
Jay Nordlinger
If Shadow is lacking in juicy tidbits [, as some have said,] then the standard of revelation has become so high that no Washington reporter can hope to succeed....Parts of Shadow are flat-out riveting....[It is] a pleasure for anyone taken with modern politics.
National Review
Rose
Barker...deftly charts the crosscurrents that move silently beneath the surface of family life, including those that bind it to earlier generations, while paying tribute to the power of secrets and the nature of memory.
USA Today
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780684869223
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 6/16/1999
  • Sold by: SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 608
  • Sales rank: 525,926
  • File size: 7 MB

Meet the Author

Bob Woodward
Bob Woodward is an associate editor at The Washington Post, where he has worked for forty-one years. He has shared in two Pulitzer Prizes, first for The Washington Post’s coverage of the Watergate scandal, and later for coverage of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. He has authored or coauthored twelve #1 national nonfiction bestsellers. He has two daughters, Tali and Diana, and lives in Washington, DC, with his wife, writer Elsa Walsh.

Biography

Perhaps the only journalist who can claim to feature both Judy Belushi and Ronald and Nancy Reagan on his list of enemies, Washington Post editor and Watergate watchdog Bob Woodward is famously (purposefully?) a lightning rod for criticism. Woodward raises as many eyebrows for his anonymous sourcing as he summons applause for his scorched-earth approach in interviewing masses of people for every project; the extensive information he digs up is held in awe, yet greetings from the nation's book critics and journalists don't always read like love letters. Joan Didion, in the pages of The New York Review of Books called The Choice, his account of the 1996 presidential campaign, "political pornography."

The New Republic opened its review of The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House by pleading with readers not to buy the book. Frank Rich, the opinion columnist for The New York Times, said that Woodward's book Shadow: Five Presidents and the Legacy of Watergate should have instead been entitled All the Presidents Stink, since none of the nation's post-Watergate presidents seemed able to withstand the author's tut-tutting over minor peccadilloes.

For the record, Judy Belushi objected to what she called Woodward's overly negative portrait of husband John's drug use and lifestyle excesses in the 1984 biography Wired, and the Reagans didn't like what he had to say about deceased CIA Director William Casey in Veil.

Still, Woodward delivers the goods.

On the job for nine months as a night cops reporter for The Washington Post in 1972, Woodward lucked into the petty crime of the century: the break-in at Democratic National Headquarters at the Watergate complex. Woodward and reporter Carl Bernstein's investigation reached the highest levels of the Nixon White House, and has become a template for investigative journalism ever since. Thousands of students have poured out of journalism schools in the ensuing years -- for better or worse -- sniffing the winds for their own private Watergate.

Woodward himself hasn't found it, but he has maintained a reputation as the investigator within American journalism, often winning unparalleled access to his subjects and developing a reputation for almost manic multiple-fact-checking of information. After turning the Watergate story into the book and film All the President's Men, Woodward and Bernstein -- or "Woodstein," as they became known in the Post's newsroom -- collaborated on a second book, The Final Days, a look at the end of the Nixon presidency. In 1979, Woodward cast his glance around Washington and found The Brethren, an inside look at the inner workings of the Supreme Court, this time with co-author Scott Armstrong.

Aside from the Belushi biography, Woodward has stuck to the political. He went inside the Clinton White House with The Agenda, inside the CIA with Veil: The Secret Wars of the CIA, 1981-1987 (raising questions about his mysterious hospital interview with a groggy Bill Casey) and inside the 1996 Clinton-Dole duel for the presidency in The Choice.

Woodward is the only author to publish four books on a sitting president during the president's time in office. He spent more time than any other journalist or author interviewing President Bush on the record -- a total of nearly 11 hours in six separate sessions from 2001 to 2008.

His four books on President George W. Bush are Bush at War (2002), about the response to 9/11 and the initial invasion of Afghanistan; Plan of Attack (2004), on how and why Bush decided to invade Iraq; State of Denial (2006), about Bush's refusal to acknowledge for nearly three years that the Iraq war was not going well as violence and instability reached staggering levels; and The War Within: A Secret White House History 2006-2008 (2008), about the deep divisions and misunderstandings on war strategy between the civilians and the military as the president finally decided to add 30,000 troops in a surge.

In every case, Woodward digs deep. And it all started when he was a teenager, working one summer as a janitor in his father's law office in Wheaton, Ill. He made his way through the papers in his father's desk, his father's partner's desk and the files in the attic.

"I looked up all my classmates and their families, and there were IRS audits or divorces or grand juries that did not lead to indictment," he told U.S. News and World Report in 2002. "It was a cold shower to see that the disposed files contained the secret lives of many of the people in this perfect town and showed they weren't perfect."

Good To Know

Richard Nixon said his wife, Pat, had a stroke while reading the Woodward and Bernstein book Final Days.

Woodward once briefly dated reporter Leslie Stahl, who also covered the Watergate story, even to the point of following John Dean into a men's room to continue questioning him.

He voted for Richard Nixon.
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    1. Hometown:
      Washington, D.C.
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 26, 1943
    2. Place of Birth:
      Geneva, Illinois
    1. Education:
      B.A., Yale University, 1965

Read an Excerpt


From Chapter 40

Gerald Ford had been traveling from California to Colorado when impeachment was voted but saw the gathering on the White House South Lawn on television. He was offended. It looked like a pep rally. It was another Clinton stunt. Ford liked Clinton personally but was wary of him. In the summer of 1993, Clinton and Ford had spent several days together in Colorado on vacation. They played golf one day with Jack Nicklaus. Clinton claimed he shot something like an 80.

Ford was shocked. Golf was a matter of honor, even for old duffers, and Clinton had repeatedly taken second shots called mulligans.

Nicklaus leaned over to Ford and whispered in disgust, "Eighty with fifty floating mulligans."

Both Ford and Jimmy Carter had agreed to speak jointly on impeachment because the issue had so many consequences for the presidency. Carter had faxed a draft statement. Ford and his staff had gone to work. After six drafts, the two ex-presidents sent a statement to the op-ed page of The New York Times.

Clinton read it on Monday, December 21.

"A Time to Heal Our Nation," by Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter.

Citing the Nixon pardon and Carter's grant of amnesty for those who had avoided the Vietnam draft, they called for reconciliation -- Senate censure without a trial. They proposed a bipartisan resolution that would require Clinton to acknowledge publicly that "he did not tell the truth under oath." They wanted an agreement that his acknowledgment could not "be used in any future criminal trial."

On Wednesday afternoon, December 30, Clinton called Ford.

Ford repeated his position. The Republicans were committed and would need a significant concession to keep the Senate trial from going forward. For censure to be feasible and practical at this point, Bill, you'll have to concede perjury.

I can't do that, Clinton said. He was firm. Those were hard, impossible terms. He made a presentation that mirrored his grand jury argument. He believed he had not lied. His lawyers supported him. He said he had told the painful truth to the grand jury -- the only issue in the impeachment charge of perjury now.

If nothing else, Clinton was articulate and smooth. But Ford said he couldn't agree.

Their proposal provides for immunity from prosecution, Ford reminded Clinton. Bill, he said, Congress could provide for immunity.

"They can't do that," Clinton said. His lawyers had researched the matter. Prosecution of an individual was an executive branch function that the Congress could not determine or prohibit.

"Bill," Ford said, "the Congress has pretty broad jurisdiction, and I've seen them do things before where the experts said they couldn't. And I happen to believe very strongly that this is an area where the Congress could affirmatively act to give you immunity."

Clinton didn't want immunity.

So it looks like a Senate trial, Ford said. A long, drawn-out trial would be a disaster.

Jerry, Clinton said, why not call Trent Lott and remind him of the advantages of a short trial.

Ford promised that he would do just that.

He reached Lott and reported that Clinton was not going to concede perjury. "Therefore I'm stepping back from doing anything," Ford told him. But he advised Lott to keep the trial short. The party could not afford to be defined as the party of impeachment.

Copyright © 1999 by Bob Woodward

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Table of Contents


CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

PART ONE

Gerald Ford: 1974-77

PART TWO

Jimmy Carter: 1977-81

PART THREE

Ronald Reagan: 1981-89

PART FOUR

George Bush: 1989-93

PART FIVE

Bill Clinton: 1993 -

EPILOGUE

NOTES

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

INDEX

PHOTO CREDITS

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First Chapter

From Chapter 40 Gerald Ford had been traveling from California to Colorado when impeachment was voted but saw the gathering on the White House South Lawn on television. He was offended. It looked like a pep rally. It was another Clinton stunt. Ford liked Clinton personally but was wary of him. In the summer of 1993, Clinton and Ford had spent several days together in Colorado on vacation. They played golf one day with Jack Nicklaus. Clinton claimed he shot something like an 80.

Ford was shocked. Golf was a matter of honor, even for old duffers, and Clinton had repeatedly taken second shots called mulligans.

Nicklaus leaned over to Ford and whispered in disgust, "Eighty with fifty floating mulligans."

Both Ford and Jimmy Carter had agreed to speak jointly on impeachment because the issue had so many consequences for the presidency. Carter had faxed a draft statement. Ford and his staff had gone to work. After six drafts, the two ex-presidents sent a statement to the op-ed page of The New York Times.

Clinton read it on Monday, December 21.

"A Time to Heal Our Nation," by Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter.

Citing the Nixon pardon and Carter's grant of amnesty for those who had avoided the Vietnam draft, they called for reconciliation -- Senate censure without a trial. They proposed a bipartisan resolution that would require Clinton to acknowledge publicly that "he did not tell the truth under oath." They wanted an agreement that his acknowledgment could not "be used in any future criminal trial."

On Wednesday afternoon, December 30, Clinton called Ford.

Ford repeated his position. The Republicans were committed and wouldneed a significant concession to keep the Senate trial from going forward. For censure to be feasible and practical at this point, Bill, you'll have to concede perjury.

I can't do that, Clinton said. He was firm. Those were hard, impossible terms. He made a presentation that mirrored his grand jury argument. He believed he had not lied. His lawyers supported him. He said he had told the painful truth to the grand jury -- the only issue in the impeachment charge of perjury now.

If nothing else, Clinton was articulate and smooth. But Ford said he couldn't agree.

Their proposal provides for immunity from prosecution, Ford reminded Clinton. Bill, he said, Congress could provide for immunity.

"They can't do that," Clinton said. His lawyers had researched the matter. Prosecution of an individual was an executive branch function that the Congress could not determine or prohibit.

"Bill," Ford said, "the Congress has pretty broad jurisdiction, and I've seen them do things before where the experts said they couldn't. And I happen to believe very strongly that this is an area where the Congress could affirmatively act to give you immunity."

Clinton didn't want immunity.

So it looks like a Senate trial, Ford said. A long, drawn-out trial would be a disaster.

Jerry, Clinton said, why not call Trent Lott and remind him of the advantages of a short trial.

Ford promised that he would do just that.

He reached Lott and reported that Clinton was not going to concede perjury. "Therefore I'm stepping back from doing anything," Ford told him. But he advised Lott to keep the trial short. The party could not afford to be defined as the party of impeachment.

Copyright © 1999 by Bob Woodward

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Interviews & Essays

On Monday, June 21st, barnesandnoble.com welcomed Bob Woodward to discuss SHADOW: FIVE PRESIDENTS AND THE LEGACY OF WATERGATE.

Jan from Miami, OH: Mr. Woodward, what was the inspiration in writing this book? Were you planning it for many years and waiting for Nixon's death to write it? Why now?

Bob Woodward: I started in '96 essentially because it was pretty clear that the scandals and investigation involving all the presidents since Nixon had changed the office and thrown the presidents off balance. It was the middle of Watergate that was not going away. Many books had been written about the legacy of Vietnam, and I wanted to tackle a longer period of history, and my editor at Simon & Schuster, Alice Mayhew, rekindled my interest in presidents I had written about.


Carolina Aguilera from New York: If you could summarize, what would you say was the biggest single effect of Watergate on the presidency?

Bob Woodward: It absorbed so much energy, and the investigations and inquiries that followed took an unbelievably deep emotional toll on the presidents, their families, and those close to them who got in trouble. So it redefined to a certain extent political power in America; presidents had less.


Peter from Seattle, WA: I understand that you interviewed former presidents Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter for this book. Were they cooperative? Distrustful? What is your assessment of these men and their accomplishments post-office?

Bob Woodward: Good question. Ford was much more cooperative and willing to allow me to conduct a serious reexamination of his pardon of Nixon. Carter was more wary. But both former presidents, almost 20 years or more after they left office, are more relaxed, less defensive, and willing to acknowledge mistakes or misjudgments. Carter as an ex-president, as everyone now says, has done a fantastic job with international health and peace issues and probably has saved tens of thousands of lives, if not more.


Melissa from New York: As a result of Nixon's dishonesty, all subsequent presidents are subject to a relentless degree of second-guessing by both the public and the media, and yet, none of the presidents -- especially Bill Clinton -- seem to have understood the depth of this distrust. What do you think of this phenomenon? Are we expecting too much of our presidents?

Bob Woodward: We should expect more of our presidents. It is not a question of second-guessing; it is a question of presidents being candid and talking straight about mistakes, rather than defensively engaging in spin and relentless denial. Someday there will be a president who realizes the opportunity they'll have by regularly being up-front and not hiding.


Dr. Ray Clark from Richmond, VA: Bob, you have contributed so much to the field of journalism. Looking forward to reading SHADOW. How long did it take you to write the book, and how much new research did it involve?

Bob Woodward: I worked on SHADOW about three years -- conducted hundreds of new interviews, and my assistant, Jeff Glasser, spent weeks in the presidential archives and libraries. The bulk of the information in the book is new or puts a new interpretation on known events. For example, the research and reporting show that President Reagan was the best at adapting to the new climate of total questioning.


Dale Hoak from Williamsburg, VA: If Nixon committed impeachable offenses for which he almost certainly would have been convicted in the Senate, would you agree that Reagan is the only succeeding president (in the Iran-contra episode) to have committed similarly serious offenses?

Bob Woodward: Reagan's activities in the Iran-contra scandal were indeed serious, and he operated out of normal channels, but based on my research, no one ever found evidence that he had criminal knowledge of the illegal diversion of funds from the Iran arms sales to the contras fighting in Nicaragua.


Emily Marshall from Baltimore: So Americans have short historical memories? How short? I ask this question because one can imagine a time in, say, about 20 years, when Watergate will have gone the way of the Korean War, so to speak -- an episode so distant as to have no impact on the way most voters may think and/or vote with respect to the presidency.

Bob Woodward: Watergate memories have faded for many, but not for me. The issues I have attempted to address in this book go to the core of the quality of government and leadership we are going to get and address the larger question of what standards of honesty and directness the public will demand. So Watergate lingers and to a certain extent is ingrained. As Jimmy Carter says, "The ghosts of Watergate walk the White House halls." I believe they will be in those corridors for decades more.


Wes from Michigan: How much of your new book covers the scandals of the Clinton presidency?

Bob Woodward: About 60 percent of the book is focused on Clinton and his troubles, but I found that it can only be reasonably understood in the context of the scandal experiences of the other four presidents -- Ford, Carter, Reagan, and Bush.


Pat from Savage, MN: In the aftermath of Watergate and with the current close scrutiny by the press, why do you think presidents become so reckless and careless and think they will not be found out?

Bob Woodward: One factor is simply that presidents who have spent their entire lives scrambling to the top of the political ladder believe that they are entitled to more slack than the current system of independent counsels, congressional investigations, and media scrutiny permits.


Luke from Greensburg, PA: In SHADOW you point to the "myth of the big-time president -- someone with heroic energy, someone who can define an era." As we approach another presidential election, do you think any of the current candidates fit the bill?

Bob Woodward: We will certainly get an answer to that, as all of the candidates likely will face troubles, investigations, and inquiry. Of the major contenders, I don't see any of them who are totally comfortable with this new world we live in. One measure of their success will be to open up and avoid concealment and legalistic dodges.


Mark from Pittsburgh: Will you ever disclose Deep Throat's identity? Has it been difficult to keep the secret for so many years?

Bob Woodward: Not tonight! It has been a professional necessity that I keep my word when sources who are reliable provide sensitive information. When the source known as Deep Throat passes away or releases me from my commitment, his identity will be revealed.


Maria from Manhattan: Do you think the last impeachment trial would have taken place had there been no Watergate?

Bob Woodward: That is a wonderful question. First, with no Watergate there would be no independent counsel law and thus no Ken Starr investigation. So it is pretty clear it was necessary to have such a law to dig into the extraordinary relationship between Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. Second, we never would have had the impeachment trial if we had not had Clinton's behavior.


Ellen from Portland, ME: What was the most fascinating interview you conducted for this book?

Bob Woodward: It would be hard to single one out. Certainly some [include] the confidential sources I used to get the story of Clinton and his handling of Whitewater and the Lewinsky scandal -- to learn his actual language, demeanor, attitude, and frequent untruths to those closest to him, including his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton.


Reagan from Mississippi: Why do you think Hillary stood by the president and came out so publicly against a "right-wing conspiracy"? Will we see a different Hillary if she gets elected to the Senate?

Bob Woodward: First, Mrs. Clinton believed her husband for months when he denied any sexual relationship with Lewinsky. Second, as the book reports, Mrs. Clinton told friends that she still believed in what her husband was doing as president, and she decided that she had a most important friendship and partnership with him. She gained strength from her religious convictions and told a friend that she and the President were doing the right thing by seeking counseling. As to your second question, it is easier to imagine the creation of the universe than to speculate precisely what we might see if there is a Senator Hillary Clinton.


Carolina from New York: In your book, you write that "after Vietnam and Watergate, the modern presidency has been limited and diminished. Its inner workings and the behavior of presidents are fully exposed." Do you think this is a negative or positive result of Vietnam and Watergate?

Bob Woodward: It is more positive simply because presidents have so much power and define much of the national political life, so they need to be held accountable. Vietnam and Watergate show the wreckage that a single president can visit upon the entire nation. The first principle of journalism is that we need to know. At the same time, civility and a sense of good taste should allow presidents and presidential candidates some privacy. But Clinton's behavior demonstrated that almost anything is possible. So skepticism and intense curiosity will drive journalists who are trying to truly understand presidential character.


Hannah Marshall from Rhode Island: What do you think Clinton's legacy will be?

Bob Woodward: Clinton is working furiously to drive the impeachment into the second paragraph of his obituary. That will be hard, but the first rule in "Clintonland" is never under estimate the man. Clintonland is a term some of those close to the President use to define the truly unique environment the President creates.


Scott from Detroit: Your brilliant investigation and reporting on the Watergate scandal permanently changed journalism and contributed to the change in the public's expectations of the modern-day American presidency. How would you assess this change and your own role in it?

Bob Woodward: Carl Bernstein, my colleague at The Washington Post, and I did some of the initial stories about Watergate and the ties to Nixon, his White House, and the reelection campaign, but the record makes it clear that the Senate, Senate Watergate committee, House impeachment investigation, and special prosecutor inquiries got to the bottom of the affair -- not the two of us.


Moderator: It's the first day of summer! What books are you looking forward to reading this summer?

Bob Woodward: DUTCH, the new Edmund Morris book about Ronald Reagan that will be out by Random House next fall. I would like to get an early read on it. I just got the Goldman Sachs book [GOLDMAN SACHS: THE CULTURE OF SUCCESS] by Lisa Endlich, and it is excellent. Former Secretary of the Navy John Webb's book, THE EMPEROR'S GENERAL, and A DANGEROUS FRIEND by Ward Just.


Moderator: Thanks so much for spending some time with us this evening, Mr. Woodward. It was an enlightening discussion and has made for a truly legendary evening. Do you have any final remarks for the online audience?

Bob Woodward: It is heartening to see so many people have not thrown in the towel on American politics and seem to realize the impact politics has on their lives. Thank you very much.


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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2002

    Lopsided

    It's funny how although the book covers five presidents and their dealings with scandals, a good two thirds of Shadow focuses on Clinton alone. I gained a deeper understanding for the sacrifices a president and his family must make as well as an understanding for the complex legal system surrounding the office. Includes some fantastic detailed accounts of private conversations and events in the White House. The reporter who broke the Watergate story lives up to his name yet again.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2000

    Woodward's Premise is Interesting, Book Lacking

    Bob Woodward's 'Shadow,' if written as the premise suggested, may have been a good book. This simply was not an investigation into the changes of the presidency stemming from Watergate. True, it does cover 6 presidencies, but only one subject is covered in detail: the Lewinsky scandal. This book is no different or better than any of the others focusing on Clinton and Lewinksky, and it is an insult that Woodward tries to place some historical spin on what is essentially a book describing what the Starr Report already revealed. I was hoping for some thorough political and historical commentary. What a disappointment!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2000

    Down and Dirty look at the Modern Presidentcy

    Woodward writes an amazing behind the scenes tale of the how Watergate has shaped the modern presidentcy. He uses this theme early and in the epilogue of the book, but for the most part the novel is an in depth look at the presidents themselves and the scandles that created scars on them that would last a lifetime, much like what happend to Nixon with Watergate. Woodword uses incredible detail in his sources getting the real story of each crisis through those who were involved on both sides of the incident. Each chapter keeps you wondering what next, and at the end Woodward doesn't come to a real conclusion, just one that Watergate has a profound impact on the modern presidentcy. I am very glad I got a chance to read this book and I consider it a true MUST READ for any historical finatic like myself.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

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