Shadow Girl

Shadow Girl

5.0 2
by Patricia Morrison
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

This novel for ages nine and up is the story of a resilient young girl who struggles as the daughter of an alcoholic father and an absentee mother. Left alone to fend for herself for days at a time, she is observed by a kind and compassionate saleswoman at the mall she retreats to every day after school to avoid going "home." The saleswoman gains her trust and

…  See more details below

Overview

This novel for ages nine and up is the story of a resilient young girl who struggles as the daughter of an alcoholic father and an absentee mother. Left alone to fend for herself for days at a time, she is observed by a kind and compassionate saleswoman at the mall she retreats to every day after school to avoid going "home." The saleswoman gains her trust and takes action into her own hands by reporting the girl's situation to social services. She is placed in foster care, where she dreams of being reunited with her dad, despite the deprivations in her life with him. The relationship between the girl and her foster mother is painful, and the girl's spirit disintegrates. Eventually, the saleswoman "adopts" the girl into her caring family, whose love and support enable her, finally, to believe in herself.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Patricia Morrison does a great job creating a world that young readers will just fall into. The descriptions of Jules’ life are so realistic that I felt I was there sometimes. I was dragged into this small town in Canada . . . and I just wanted to know more about Jules, the Chapmans and the Adamsons. I wanted to see Jules succeed and find a happy life for herself with a family that loves her. I cheered for Jules the whole way through and I felt an immense sadness when she was sad or scared.”
The One with the Prettiest Views
School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—In 1963, Jules, 11, lives with her father after her mother's departure, and their fragile situation becomes more tenuous when he leaves her on her own for days. Her visits to a nearby department store to play with a doll help her imagine a better life, but that isn't what she gets. Confessing her abandonment to a friendly clerk results in Jules being put into foster care where her hurt and loneliness become sharper. Some small blessings are outweighed by the distracted parents and older sisters who can't be bothered. Morrison shows Jules's thoughts in first-person italics while the third-person narrative describes events. These italics are effective in showing how the girl's perspective is not what those around her expect and the depth of her distress as she struggles to be loved. As her alcoholic father distances himself and becomes increasingly unreliable and eventually disappears, Jules longs for a normal family and a place where she is not a shadow. Acting out at school and in the foster home are attempts to be seen for herself, but it doesn't work. Touching and painful at times, this story reads like a memoir, and it will satisfy those who want a sad story. Tears will flow.—Carol A. Edwards, Denver Public Library, CO

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781770492905
Publisher:
Tundra
Publication date:
02/12/2013
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Born and raised in Toronto, Patricia Morrison traveled extensively before settling down in Langley, British Columbia. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Simon Fraser University, where she majored in English and Women's Studies. She worked for fourteen years in child welfare for the Ministry of Children and Families and was a community activist for more than twenty years. She is married with children. Shadow Girl is her first book.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Shadow Girl 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
crayolakym More than 1 year ago
Reviewed by Avery, age 9, for City Book Review This book was so sad that it almost made me cry while reading it. Jules is an eleven year old whose father drinks too much and she is left to care for herself most of the time. She doesn’t have any money and goes without food a lot of the time as well as often not having any heat, so Jules spends a lot of her time down at the Six Points Plaza where she pretends she is in a better place. That is until someone at the mall who she thinks is her friend reports her to child services and she gets placed in foster care, away from her dad, and all she can think about is reuniting with him in spite of his poor parenting skills. To make matters worse, she doesn’t get along with her foster mother and it’s making her really depressed. “Of course not. But… sometimes people, families, need extra help just to stay together, to keep going. I know that myself…” While the book does have a happier ending, this is a situation that people need to be more aware of as it happens all of the time, all around, every day. I highly suggest this book. I think it brings out compassion in people. *You can view the original review at City Book Review
DiiMI More than 1 year ago
A young girl, growing up mostly ignored, abused by society, as well as her alcoholic father finds escape in the toy department of a local department store. A kind clerk in the store sets the wheels in motion for Jules to be removed from her home and placed in the foster care system. Jules goes from one form of feeling like a shadow in her own home to another in the home of her foster parents. Her only place of refuge seems to be around the store clerk, who has invited her to visit with her warm accepting family. this is the type of home and love that Jules has never had and she craves it, no longer feeling worthy of love. Sophie, the store clerk, understands Jules, she's been there, lost, afraid and alone. She may be Jules' only salvation. Patricia Morrison has done something amazing here. She has written a book that can be read by anyone! Through the eyes and thoughts of Jules, the reader is seeing life as a young child would see it, and I found it heartbreaking to be in this poor girl's mind. This was the voice of a child, written so another child would understand. That said, this is written so an adult would also find it riveting. I admit that this evoked so many emotions in me, this will stay with me for a long time. This ARC edition was provided by NetGalley and Random House of Canada Limited, in exchange for an honest review. Feb 12 2013