Shadow of the Xel'naga (Starcraft #2)

( 22 )

Overview

Far in the future, 60,000 light-years from Earth, a loose confederacy of Terran exiles are locked in battle with the enigmatic Protoss and the ruthless Zerg Swarm. Each species struggles to ensure its own survival among the stars in a war that will herald the beginning of mankind's greatest chapter — or foretell its violent, bloody end.
Bhekar Ro: a bleak, backwater world on the fringe of the Terran Dominion, where every day is a struggle to survive for its handful of human ...

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Overview

Far in the future, 60,000 light-years from Earth, a loose confederacy of Terran exiles are locked in battle with the enigmatic Protoss and the ruthless Zerg Swarm. Each species struggles to ensure its own survival among the stars in a war that will herald the beginning of mankind's greatest chapter — or foretell its violent, bloody end.
Bhekar Ro: a bleak, backwater world on the fringe of the Terran Dominion, where every day is a struggle to survive for its handful of human colonists. It is a veritable wasteland — one speck of dust among many in the vast, dark sea of space. But when the most violent storm in recent memory unearths an unfathomable alien artifact, Bhekar Ro becomes the greatest prize in the Terran Sector — the Holy Grail of the Zerg, the Protoss, and Humanity alike — as forces from the three great powers converge to claim the lost secrets of the most powerful species the universe has ever known.
shadow of the xel'naga
An original tale of space warfare novels set in the world of the bestselling computer game!

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780671041496
  • Publisher: Pocket Books/Star Trek
  • Publication date: 7/28/2001
  • Series: Starcraft Series , #2
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 6.70 (w) x 4.20 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Gabriel Mesta is better known as his alter ego of Kevin J. Anderson. He has over 16 million books in print in 29 languages. Readers are most familiar with his Star Wars and X-Files novels; the Young Jedi Knights series with his wife, Rebecca Moesta; the prequels to Dune with Brian Herbert; and his original SF epic, "The Saga of Seven Suns" — Hidden Empire, A Forest of Stars, and Horizon Storms (in which "Gabriel Mesta" briefly appears as a fictional character). His previous "fantastic historical" novel, Captain Nemo (written under the not-so-clever pen name of K. J. Anderson), has been optioned for a feature film or a TV miniseries. For more information on his numerous projects, see his website, www.wordfire.com.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

As a smothering blanket of darkness descended over the town of Free Haven, the rugged settlers scrambled to avoid the storm. Night came quickly on the colony planet of Bhekar Ro, with plenty of wind but no stars.

Pitch-black clouds swirled over the horizon, caught on the sharp mountainous ridge surrounding the broad valley that formed the heart of the struggling agricultural colony. Already, explosive thunder crackled over the ridge like a poorly aimed artillery barrage. Each blast was powerful enough to be detected on several still-functioning seismographs planted around the explored areas.

Atmospheric conditions created thunder slams with sonic-boom intensity. The roar itself was sometimes sufficient to cause destruction. And what the sonic thunder left unharmed, the laser-lightning tore to pieces.

Forty years earlier, when the first colonists had fled the oppressive government of the Terran Confederacy, they had been duped into believing that this place could be made into a new Eden. After three generations, the stubborn settlers refused to give up.

Riding in the shotgun seat beside her brother Lars, Octavia Bren looked through the streaked windshield of the giant robo-harvester as they hurriedly trundled back to town. The rumble of the mechanical treads and the roar of the engine almost drowned out the sonic thunder. Almost.

Laser-lightning blasts seared down from the clouds like luminous spears, straight-line lances of static discharge that left glassy pockmarks on the terrain. The laser-lightning reminded Octavia of library images she had seen of a big Yamato gun fired from a Battlecruiser in orbit.

"Why in the galaxy did our grandparents ever choose to move here?" she asked rhetorically. More laser-lightning burned craters into the countryside.

"For the scenery, of course," Lars joked.

While the bombardment of hail would clear the air of the ever-present dust and grit, it would also damage the crops of triticale-wheat and salad-moss that barely clung to the rocky soil. The Free Haven settlers had few emergency provisions to help them withstand any severe harvest failure, and it had been a long time since they had asked for outside help.

But they would survive somehow. They always had.

Lars watched the approaching storm, a spark of excitement in his hazel eyes. Though he was a year older than his sister, when he wore that cocky grin on his face he looked like a reckless teenager. "I think we can outrun the worst of it."

"You always overestimate what we can do, Lars." Even at the age of seventeen, Octavia was known for her stability and common sense. "And I always end up saving your butt."

Lars seemed to have a bottomless reservoir of energy and enthusiasm. She gripped her seat as the big all-purpose vehicle crunched through a trench and continued along a wide beaten path between plantings, heading toward the distant lights of the town.

Shortly after their parents' death, it had been Lars's crazy suggestion that the two of them expand their cultivated land and add remote automated mineral mines to their holdings. She had tried, unsuccessfully, to talk him out of it. "Let's be practical, Lars. We've already got our hands full with the farm as it is. Expanding would leave us time for nothing but work — not even families."

Half of the colonists' eligible daughters had already filed requests to marry him — Cyn McCarthy had filed three separate times! — but so far Lars had made plenty of excuses. Colonists were considered adults at the age of fifteen on this rough world, and many were married and had children before they reached their eighteenth birthday. Next year, Octavia would be facing the same decision, and choices were few in Free Haven.

"Are you sure we want to do this?" she had asked one last time.

"Of course. It's worth the extra effort. And once we're established there'll be plenty of time for each of us to get married," Lars had insisted, shaking back his shoulder-length sandy hair. She had never been able to argue with that grin. "Before we know it, Octavia, it'll all turn around, and then you'll thank me."

He had been certain they could grow crops high on the slopes of the Back Forty, the ridge that separated their lands from another broad basin and more mountains twelve kilometers away. So the brother and sister had used their robo-harvester to scrape flat a new swath of barely arable farmland and plant new crops. They also set up automated mineral mining stations on the rocky slopes of the foothills. That had been almost two years ago.

Now a gust of wind slammed into the broad metal side of the harvester, rattling the sealed windowports. Lars compensated on the steering column and accelerated. He didn't even look tired from their long day of hard work.

Laser-lightning seared across the sky, leaving colorful tracks across her retinas. Though he couldn't see any better than his sister, Lars didn't slow down at all. They both just wanted to get home.

"Watch out for the boulders!" Octavia said, her piercing green eyes spotting the hazard as rain slashed across the windows of the impressive tractorlike vehicle.

Lars discounted the rocks, drove over them, and crushed the stone with the vehicle's treads. "Aww, don't underestimate the capabilities of the machine."

She snorted indelicately. "But if you throw a plate or fry a hydraulic cam, I'm the one who has to fix it."

The multipurpose robo-harvester, the most important piece of equipment any of the colonists owned, was capable of bulldozing, tilling, destroying boulders, planting, and harvesting crops. Some of the big machines had rock-crusher attachments, others had flamethrowers. The vehicles were also practical for traversing ten- to twenty-klick distances over rough terrain.

The hull of the robo-harvester, once a gleaming cherry red, was now faded, scratched, and pitted. The engine ran as smoothly as a lullaby, though, and that was all Octavia cared about.

Now she checked the weather scanner and atmospheric-pressure tracker in the robo-harvester's cabin, but the readings were all wild. "Looks like a bad one tonight."

"They're always bad ones. This is Bhekar Ro, after all — what do you expect?"

Octavia shrugged. "I guess it was good enough for Mom and Dad." Back when they were alive.

She and Lars were the only survivors of their family. Every family among the settlers had lost friends or relatives. Taming an uncooperative new world was dangerous, rarely rewarding work, always ripe for tragedy.

But the people here still followed their dreams. These exhausted colonists had left the tight governmental fences of the Confederacy for the promised land of Bhekar Ro some forty years before. They had sought independence and a new start, away from the turmoil and constant civil wars among the inner Confederacy worlds.

The original settlers had wanted nothing more than peace and freedom. They had begun idealistically, establishing a central town with resources for all the colonists to share, naming it Free Haven, and dividing farmland equally among the able-bodied workers. But in time the idealism faded as the colonists endured toil and new hardships on a planet that did not live up to their expectations.

Nobody among the colonists ever suggested going back, though — especially not Octavia and Lars Bren.

The lights of Free Haven glowed like a warm, welcoming paradise as the robo-harvester approached. In the distance Octavia could already hear the storm-warning siren next to the old Missile Turret in the town plaza, signaling colonists to find shelter. Everyone else — at least the colonists who had common sense — had already barricaded themselves inside their prefabricated homes to shelter from the storm.

They passed outlying homes and fields, crossed over dry irrigation ditches, and reached the perimeter of the town, which was laid out in the shape of an octagon. A low perimeter fence encircled the settlement, but the gates for the main streets had never been closed.

An explosion of sonic thunder roared so close that the robo-harvester rattled. Lars gritted his teeth and drove onward. Octavia remembered sitting on her father's knee during her childhood, laughing at the thunder as her family had gathered inside their home, feeling safe....

Their grandparents had aged rapidly from the rigors of life here and had the dubious distinction of being the first to be buried in Bhekar Ro's ever-growing cemetery outside Free Haven's octagonal perimeter. Then, not long after Octavia had turned fifteen, the spore blight had struck.

The sparse crops of mutated triticale-wheat had been afflicted by a tiny black smut on a few of the kernels. Because food was in short supply, Octavia's mother had set aside the moldy wheat for herself and her husband, feeding untainted bread to their children. The meager meal had seemed like any other: rough and tasteless, but nutritious enough to keep them alive.

Octavia remembered that last night so clearly. She had been suffering from one of her occasional migraines and a dire sense of unreasonable foreboding. Her mother had sent the teenage girl to bed early, where Octavia had had terrible nightmares.

The next morning she had awakened in a too-quiet house to find both of her parents dead in their bed. Beneath wet sheets twisted about by their final agony, the bodies of her mother and father were a quivering, oozing mass of erupted fungal bodies, rounded mushrooms of exploding spores that rapidly disintegrated all flesh....

Lars and Octavia had never returned to that house, burning it to the ground along with the tainted fields and the homes of seventeen other families that had been infected by the horrible, parasitic disease.

Though a terrible blow to the colony, the spore blight had drawn the survivors together even more tightly. The new mayor, Jacob "Nik" Nikolai, had delivered an impassioned eulogy for all the victims of the spore plague, somehow rekindling the fires of independence in the process and giving the settlers the drive to stay here. They had already lived through so much, survived so many hardships, that they could pull through this.

Moving together into an empty prefab dwelling at the edge of Free Haven, Octavia and Lars had rebuilt their lives. They made plans. They expanded. They tracked their automated mines and watched the seismic monitors for signs of tectonic disturbances that might affect their work or the town. The two drove out to the fields each day and labored side by side until well after dark. They worked harder, risked more...and survived.

As Octavia and Lars passed through the open gate and drove around the town square toward their residence, the storm finally struck with full force. It became a slanting wall of rain and hail as the robo-harvester ground its way past the lights and barricaded doors of metal-walled huts. Their own home looked the same as all the others, but Lars found it by instinct, even in the blinding downpour.

He spun the large vehicle to a halt in the flat gravel clearing in front of their house. He locked down the treads and powered off the engine, while Octavia tugged a reinforced hat down over her head and got ready to jump out of the cab and make a break for the door. Even running ten feet in this storm would be a miserable ordeal.

Before the robo-harvester's systems dimmed completely, Octavia checked the fuel reservoirs, since her brother never remembered to do so. "We'll need to get more Vespene gas from the refinery."

Lars grabbed the door handle and hunched his head down. "Tomorrow, tomorrow. Rastin's probably hiding inside his hut cursing the wind right now. That old codger doesn't like storms any more than I do."

He popped open the hatch and jumped out seconds before a strong gust slammed the door back into its frame. Octavia exited from the other side, hopping from the step to the broad tractor treads to the ground.

As she ran beside her brother in a mad dash to their dwelling, the hail hit them like machine-gun bullets. Lars got their front door open, and the siblings crashed into the house, drenched and windblown. But at least they were safe from the storm.

Sonic thunder pealed across the sky again. Lars undid the fastenings on his jacket. Octavia yanked off her dripping hat and tossed it into a corner, then powered up their lights so she could check one of the old seismographs they had installed in their hut.

Few of the other colonists bothered to monitor planetary conditions or track underground activity anymore, but Lars had thought it important to place seismographs in their automated mining stations out in the Back Forty foothills. Of course, Octavia had been the one to repair and install the aging monitoring equipment.

Lars had been right, though. There had been increasing tremors of late, setting off ripples of aftershocks that originated deep in the mountain range at the far side of the next valley.

Just what we need — another thing to worry about, Octavia thought, looking at the graph with concern.

Lars joined her to read the seismograph strip. The long and shaky line appeared to have been drawn by a caff-addicted old man. He saw several little blips and spikes, probably echoes of sonic thunder, but no major seismic events. "Now that's interesting. Aren't you glad we didn't have an earthquake tonight?"

She knew it would happen even before he finished his sentence. Maybe it was another one of Octavia's powerful premonitions, or just a discouraged acceptance that things would get worse whenever they had the opportunity.

Just as Lars formed another of his cocky grins, a tremor rippled through the ground, as if the uneasy crust of Bhekar Ro were having a nightmare. At first Octavia hoped it was merely a particularly close blast of sonic thunder, but the tremors continued to build, lurching the floor beneath their feet and shaking the entire prefab house.

arLars tensed his powerful muscles to ride out the temblor. They both watched the seismograph go wild. "The readings are off the scale!"

Astonished, Octavia pointed out, "This isn't even centered here. It's fifteen klicks away, over the ridge."

"Great. Not far from where we set up all our automated mining equipment." The seismograph went dead, its sensors overloaded, as the quake pounded the ground for what seemed an eternity before it gradually began to fade. "Looks like you're gonna have some repair work to do tomorrow, Octavia."

"I've always got repair work to do," she said.

Outside, the storm reached a crescendo. Lars and Octavia sat together in weary silence, just waiting out the disaster. "Do you want to play cards?" he asked.

Then all the lights inside their dwelling went out, leaving them in pitch blackness lit only by flares from the laser-lightning.

"Not tonight," she said.

Copyright © 2001 by Blizzard Entertainment

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First Chapter

Chapter One

As a smothering blanket of darkness descended over the town of Free Haven, the rugged settlers scrambled to avoid the storm. Night came quickly on the colony planet of Bhekar Ro, with plenty of wind but no stars.

Pitch-black clouds swirled over the horizon, caught on the sharp mountainous ridge surrounding the broad valley that formed the heart of the struggling agricultural colony. Already, explosive thunder crackled over the ridge like a poorly aimed artillery barrage. Each blast was powerful enough to be detected on several still-functioning seismographs planted around the explored areas.

Atmospheric conditions created thunder slams with sonic-boom intensity. The roar itself was sometimes sufficient to cause destruction. And what the sonic thunder left unharmed, the laser-lightning tore to pieces.

Forty years earlier, when the first colonists had fled the oppressive government of the Terran Confederacy, they had been duped into believing that this place could be made into a new Eden. After three generations, the stubborn settlers refused to give up.

Riding in the shotgun seat beside her brother Lars, Octavia Bren looked through the streaked windshield of the giant robo-harvester as they hurriedly trundled back to town. The rumble of the mechanical treads and the roar of the engine almost drowned out the sonic thunder. Almost.

Laser-lightning blasts seared down from the clouds like luminous spears, straight-line lances of static discharge that left glassy pockmarks on the terrain. The laser-lightning reminded Octavia of library images she had seen of a big Yamato gun fired from a Battlecruiser in orbit.

"Why in the galaxy did our grandparents ever choose to move here?" she asked rhetorically. More laser-lightning burned craters into the countryside.

"For the scenery, of course," Lars joked.

While the bombardment of hail would clear the air of the ever-present dust and grit, it would also damage the crops of triticale-wheat and salad-moss that barely clung to the rocky soil. The Free Haven settlers had few emergency provisions to help them withstand any severe harvest failure, and it had been a long time since they had asked for outside help.

But they would survive somehow. They always had.

Lars watched the approaching storm, a spark of excitement in his hazel eyes. Though he was a year older than his sister, when he wore that cocky grin on his face he looked like a reckless teenager. "I think we can outrun the worst of it."

"You always overestimate what we can do, Lars." Even at the age of seventeen, Octavia was known for her stability and common sense. "And I always end up saving your butt."

Lars seemed to have a bottomless reservoir of energy and enthusiasm. She gripped her seat as the big all-purpose vehicle crunched through a trench and continued along a wide beaten path between plantings, heading toward the distant lights of the town.

Shortly after their parents' death, it had been Lars's crazy suggestion that the two of them expand their cultivated land and add remote automated mineral mines to their holdings. She had tried, unsuccessfully, to talk him out of it. "Let's be practical, Lars. We've already got our hands full with the farm as it is. Expanding would leave us time for nothing but work -- not even families."

Half of the colonists' eligible daughters had already filed requests to marry him -- Cyn McCarthy had filed three separate times! -- but so far Lars had made plenty of excuses. Colonists were considered adults at the age of fifteen on this rough world, and many were married and had children before they reached their eighteenth birthday. Next year, Octavia would be facing the same decision, and choices were few in Free Haven.

"Are you sure we want to do this?" she had asked one last time.

"Of course. It's worth the extra effort. And once we're established there'll be plenty of time for each of us to get married," Lars had insisted, shaking back his shoulder-length sandy hair. She had never been able to argue with that grin. "Before we know it, Octavia, it'll all turn around, and then you'll thank me."

He had been certain they could grow crops high on the slopes of the Back Forty, the ridge that separated their lands from another broad basin and more mountains twelve kilometers away. So the brother and sister had used their robo-harvester to scrape flat a new swath of barely arable farmland and plant new crops. They also set up automated mineral mining stations on the rocky slopes of the foothills. That had been almost two years ago.

Now a gust of wind slammed into the broad metal side of the harvester, rattling the sealed windowports. Lars compensated on the steering column and accelerated. He didn't even look tired from their long day of hard work.

Laser-lightning seared across the sky, leaving colorful tracks across her retinas. Though he couldn't see any better than his sister, Lars didn't slow down at all. They both just wanted to get home.

"Watch out for the boulders!" Octavia said, her piercing green eyes spotting the hazard as rain slashed across the windows of the impressive tractorlike vehicle.

Lars discounted the rocks, drove over them, and crushed the stone with the vehicle's treads. "Aww, don't underestimate the capabilities of the machine."

She snorted indelicately. "But if you throw a plate or fry a hydraulic cam, I'm the one who has to fix it."

The multipurpose robo-harvester, the most important piece of equipment any of the colonists owned, was capable of bulldozing, tilling, destroying boulders, planting, and harvesting crops. Some of the big machines had rock-crusher attachments, others had flamethrowers. The vehicles were also practical for traversing ten- to twenty-klick distances over rough terrain.

The hull of the robo-harvester, once a gleaming cherry red, was now faded, scratched, and pitted. The engine ran as smoothly as a lullaby, though, and that was all Octavia cared about.

Now she checked the weather scanner and atmospheric-pressure tracker in the robo-harvester's cabin, but the readings were all wild. "Looks like a bad one tonight."

"They're always bad ones. This is Bhekar Ro, after all -- what do you expect?"

Octavia shrugged. "I guess it was good enough for Mom and Dad." Back when they were alive.

She and Lars were the only survivors of their family. Every family among the settlers had lost friends or relatives. Taming an uncooperative new world was dangerous, rarely rewarding work, always ripe for tragedy.

But the people here still followed their dreams. These exhausted colonists had left the tight governmental fences of the Confederacy for the promised land of Bhekar Ro some forty years before. They had sought independence and a new start, away from the turmoil and constant civil wars among the inner Confederacy worlds.

The original settlers had wanted nothing more than peace and freedom. They had begun idealistically, establishing a central town with resources for all the colonists to share, naming it Free Haven, and dividing farmland equally among the able-bodied workers. But in time the idealism faded as the colonists endured toil and new hardships on a planet that did not live up to their expectations.

Nobody among the colonists ever suggested going back, though -- especially not Octavia and Lars Bren.

The lights of Free Haven glowed like a warm, welcoming paradise as the robo-harvester approached. In the distance Octavia could already hear the storm-warning siren next to the old Missile Turret in the town plaza, signaling colonists to find shelter. Everyone else -- at least the colonists who had common sense -- had already barricaded themselves inside their prefabricated homes to shelter from the storm.

They passed outlying homes and fields, crossed over dry irrigation ditches, and reached the perimeter of the town, which was laid out in the shape of an octagon. A low perimeter fence encircled the settlement, but the gates for the main streets had never been closed.

An explosion of sonic thunder roared so close that the robo-harvester rattled. Lars gritted his teeth and drove onward. Octavia remembered sitting on her father's knee during her childhood, laughing at the thunder as her family had gathered inside their home, feeling safe....

Their grandparents had aged rapidly from the rigors of life here and had the dubious distinction of being the first to be buried in Bhekar Ro's ever-growing cemetery outside Free Haven's octagonal perimeter. Then, not long after Octavia had turned fifteen, the spore blight had struck.

The sparse crops of mutated triticale-wheat had been afflicted by a tiny black smut on a few of the kernels. Because food was in short supply, Octavia's mother had set aside the moldy wheat for herself and her husband, feeding untainted bread to their children. The meager meal had seemed like any other: rough and tasteless, but nutritious enough to keep them alive.

Octavia remembered that last night so clearly. She had been suffering from one of her occasional migraines and a dire sense of unreasonable foreboding. Her mother had sent the teenage girl to bed early, where Octavia had had terrible nightmares.

The next morning she had awakened in a too-quiet house to find both of her parents dead in their bed. Beneath wet sheets twisted about by their final agony, the bodies of her mother and father were a quivering, oozing mass of erupted fungal bodies, rounded mushrooms of exploding spores that rapidly disintegrated all flesh....

Lars and Octavia had never returned to that house, burning it to the ground along with the tainted fields and the homes of seventeen other families that had been infected by the horrible, parasitic disease.

Though a terrible blow to the colony, the spore blight had drawn the survivors together even more tightly. The new mayor, Jacob "Nik" Nikolai, had delivered an impassioned eulogy for all the victims of the spore plague, somehow rekindling the fires of independence in the process and giving the settlers the drive to stay here. They had already lived through so much, survived so many hardships, that they could pull through this.

Moving together into an empty prefab dwelling at the edge of Free Haven, Octavia and Lars had rebuilt their lives. They made plans. They expanded. They tracked their automated mines and watched the seismic monitors for signs of tectonic disturbances that might affect their work or the town. The two drove out to the fields each day and labored side by side until well after dark. They worked harder, risked more...and survived.

As Octavia and Lars passed through the open gate and drove around the town square toward their residence, the storm finally struck with full force. It became a slanting wall of rain and hail as the robo-harvester ground its way past the lights and barricaded doors of metal-walled huts. Their own home looked the same as all the others, but Lars found it by instinct, even in the blinding downpour.

He spun the large vehicle to a halt in the flat gravel clearing in front of their house. He locked down the treads and powered off the engine, while Octavia tugged a reinforced hat down over her head and got ready to jump out of the cab and make a break for the door. Even running ten feet in this storm would be a miserable ordeal.

Before the robo-harvester's systems dimmed completely, Octavia checked the fuel reservoirs, since her brother never remembered to do so. "We'll need to get more Vespene gas from the refinery."

Lars grabbed the door handle and hunched his head down. "Tomorrow, tomorrow. Rastin's probably hiding inside his hut cursing the wind right now. That old codger doesn't like storms any more than I do."

He popped open the hatch and jumped out seconds before a strong gust slammed the door back into its frame. Octavia exited from the other side, hopping from the step to the broad tractor treads to the ground.

As she ran beside her brother in a mad dash to their dwelling, the hail hit them like machine-gun bullets. Lars got their front door open, and the siblings crashed into the house, drenched and windblown. But at least they were safe from the storm.

Sonic thunder pealed across the sky again. Lars undid the fastenings on his jacket. Octavia yanked off her dripping hat and tossed it into a corner, then powered up their lights so she could check one of the old seismographs they had installed in their hut.

Few of the other colonists bothered to monitor planetary conditions or track underground activity anymore, but Lars had thought it important to place seismographs in their automated mining stations out in the Back Forty foothills. Of course, Octavia had been the one to repair and install the aging monitoring equipment.

Lars had been right, though. There had been increasing tremors of late, setting off ripples of aftershocks that originated deep in the mountain range at the far side of the next valley.

Just what we need -- another thing to worry about, Octavia thought, looking at the graph with concern.

Lars joined her to read the seismograph strip. The long and shaky line appeared to have been drawn by a caff-addicted old man. He saw several little blips and spikes, probably echoes of sonic thunder, but no major seismic events. "Now that's interesting. Aren't you glad we didn't have an earthquake tonight?"

She knew it would happen even before he finished his sentence. Maybe it was another one of Octavia's powerful premonitions, or just a discouraged acceptance that things would get worse whenever they had the opportunity.

Just as Lars formed another of his cocky grins, a tremor rippled through the ground, as if the uneasy crust of Bhekar Ro were having a nightmare. At first Octavia hoped it was merely a particularly close blast of sonic thunder, but the tremors continued to build, lurching the floor beneath their feet and shaking the entire prefab house.

Lars tensed his powerful muscles to ride out the temblor. They both watched the seismograph go wild. "The readings are off the scale!"

Astonished, Octavia pointed out, "This isn't even centered here. It's fifteen klicks away, over the ridge."

"Great. Not far from where we set up all our automated mining equipment." The seismograph went dead, its sensors overloaded, as the quake pounded the ground for what seemed an eternity before it gradually began to fade. "Looks like you're gonna have some repair work to do tomorrow, Octavia."

"I've always got repair work to do," she said.

Outside, the storm reached a crescendo. Lars and Octavia sat together in weary silence, just waiting out the disaster. "Do you want to play cards?" he asked.

Then all the lights inside their dwelling went out, leaving them in pitch blackness lit only by flares from the laser-lightning.

"Not tonight," she said.

Copyright © 2001 by Blizzard Entertainment

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2005

    An Excellent Book

    This book was by far one of the best books I have ever read. The action was great, but the plot was a little lacking. Sometimes, things got a little confusing or exaggerated. Overall, I highly recommend this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2004

    The Protoss can't save you!

    Out of the three starcraft books this one is ranked number three. I found the storyline to be ok, but not as exciting and pulse pounding as the other two. I found myself wanting to take a break after only a few pages. It's worth a read, just don't expect to much. This is the only one that actually gives the protoss a big role, but it doesn't make up for the rest of the story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2004

    Excellant Book

    This is the one taht started me on the StarCraft (novel) series. Excellantly written the story was great. Recommended for StarCraft and Sci-Fi fans alike.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2004

    Not up to par

    First and foremost, this book lacks descriptive details and uses redundent terms, for example 'as if' which is quoted in almost every page throughout the story. The character dialogue is horrible and uninteresting. The ending, and the whole story for that matter, was completely out of context of the Starcraft universe. At times I was wondering if I was reading the right book or a Lord of the Rings wannabe.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2003

    Shadow of the Xel'naga is mostly good

    I have read all three paperbacks from pocket books, and i would have to put Shadow of the Xel'naga at number three. I have read Star Wars novels by the author(s), and i'd have to say that he (and she) do a lot better job in a universe that they understand better. It seems much of the time that the author simply looked at the official Blizzard manual and didn't take the time to look beneath the surface. I would have to say that i enjoyed the setting development- Bhekar Rho sounds like a pretty cool place- if you don't mind sonic thunderstorms. But, the action pretty much sucked- except for a brief blurb about a Ghost calling down a tactical nuclear strike. Unfortunately, the book mostly reads like a transcript from a badly played battle.net game. Read your friend's if you want, but don't bother wasting your own money on this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2003

    Awesome Book

    It was a very good book I have gotten the chance to read the others,but Shadow of the `Xel Naga was excellent. If you like Starcraft I think you will enjoy this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 30, 2002

    Good, but with minor problems.

    This book was fairly interesting, but I really hated the portrait they painted of Arcturus Mengsk. The one in Liberty's Crusade was more acurate.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 9, 2002

    Great Book

    I thought that this book was great! It is suspenseful and and keeps you wanting to read.Eventhough there were times when i thought that something was going to happen it didn't something else did.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2002

    I DIDNT READ THIS BOOK

    THIS BOOK LOOKS KOOL doesnt it but i havent redad it all but i love it although i want starcraft uprising but who cares accually i only read like 2 pages of my friends

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2002

    Outstanding!

    As with the first Starcraft book, full of action, suspense and mystery. Better than the first Starcraft novel. Practially identical to the plot of them game: Starcraft: Brood War.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 12, 2002

    This books sucks!

    This book was a complete waste of money... being an avid StarCraft player, I quickly bought it and took it home, and read it... at it turned out, it was not very good... If you play Startcraft, your gonna be expecially dissapointed... the plot was less than weak, a stupid ending, and hardly used any Starcraft units at all! It did have a unique twist at the end, but hardly enough to redeem the rest of the book. The Speed Of Darkness, the next in the sequel, was only marginally better. My opinion: buy a different book, onless you really, really like starcraft or just enjoy reading poorly written books.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2002

    GREATEST STARCRAFT BOOK YET!!!!!!!!!!

    This book is a jewel among rocks! It had me at the edge of my chair from beginning to end! If you play StarCraft, then WHAT ARE YOU WAITING FOR?!?!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 27, 2002

    AWSOME!!!! MUST READ!!!!

    This book is awsome lots of suspence, and views from the Zerg, the Protoss, and the Terrain races. this is a action filled book and i sugest that you read it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2001

    The best book ever

    This book is the best!!!!!!!!!! It has action and adventure. If I could choose any book in the world to read, this would be my pick.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 9, 2001

    A must read!!

    I really recommend this book to any Starcraft player. This book has a lot of action in it. The details in the book are excellent. GET THIS BOOK IF YOU ARE A STARCRAFT PLAYER!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 5, 2001

    A Must Read

    Set on the outskirts of the Terran Dominian, the planet Bheker Ro becomes the greatest prize in the Dominian. Octavia and Lars of New Haven, the only city of Bheker Ro, have found an artifact that is wanted by the Zerg and the Protoss. A great buy if you like action and adventure. You will like this book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 26, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 22 Customer Reviews

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