Shadow Puppets (Ender's Shadow Series #3)

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Overview

"Earth and its society have been changed irrevocably in the aftermath of Ender Wiggin's victory over the Formics. The unity forced upon the warring nations by an alien enemy has shattered. Nations are rising again, seeking territory and influence, and most of all, seeking to control the skills and loyalty of the children from the Battle School." But one person has a better idea. Peter Wiggin, Ender's older, more ruthless brother, sees that any hope for the future of Earth lies in restoring a sense of unity and purpose. And he has an irresistible
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Shadow Puppets (Ender's Shadow Series #3)

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Overview

"Earth and its society have been changed irrevocably in the aftermath of Ender Wiggin's victory over the Formics. The unity forced upon the warring nations by an alien enemy has shattered. Nations are rising again, seeking territory and influence, and most of all, seeking to control the skills and loyalty of the children from the Battle School." But one person has a better idea. Peter Wiggin, Ender's older, more ruthless brother, sees that any hope for the future of Earth lies in restoring a sense of unity and purpose. And he has an irresistible call on the loyalty of Earth's young warriors. With Bean at his side, the two will reshape our future.
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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Fantasy master Orson Scott Card brings us a new installment in his classic Ender saga. Bean, the genetic anomaly who served as second-in-command during the genocidal war against the Formics in Ender's Game, returns in a series of "parallel" novels beginning with Ender's Shadow and continuing with Shadow of the Hegemon, which focus both on Bean's career and on the turbulent, divisive aftermath of the Formic War. Now he's back in another powerful tale.

Shadow Puppets begins when reigning hegemon Peter Wiggin rescues Achilles Flandres, a charismatic psychopath imprisoned in China, foolishly believing he can control Achilles. As Peter comes to terms with his own folly, various interconnected dramas unfold. Bean and his girlfriend, Petra Arkanian, go to ground, convinced that Achilles wants them dead. In India, a young idealist propagates a Gandhi-like act of revolt against the voracious Chinese usurpers. And in Damascus, a clandestine Muslim army arises, preparing -- with the aid of Bean and Petra -- to launch a war of liberation against the overextended Chinese empire.

The result is a sometimes overcrowded narrative in which the fate of nations is once again in the hands of gifted children. Set against this overarching scenario, balancing and humanizing it, is the small, personal story of Bean and Petra, and their obsessive, ultimately dangerous efforts to bear healthy, "normal" children. Card has always been both storyteller and moralist, and his narratives are driven by clearly defined moral imperatives. In Shadow Puppets, he addresses large, fundamental questions concerning loyalty, responsibility, and the importance of humane, ethical standards in our public and private lives. The resulting narrative is quintessential Card: impassioned, argumentative, and difficult to set aside. Bill Sheehan

USA Today
"The novels of Orson Scott Card's Ender series are an intriguing combination of action, military and political strategy, elaborate war games and psychology."
USA Today
"The novels of Orson Scott Card's Ender series are an intriguing combination of action, military and political strategy, elaborate war games and psychology."
Elizabeth Weise
In Shadow of the Hegemon, the abilities of Bean and the others to outthink their captors and undermine their plans make for a page-turning read.
USA Today
Publishers Weekly

Card spins another adventure in the Enderverse, following the exploits of Bean, Petra, Peter Wiggin and many of the other Battle School students. Wiggin, the Hegemon of a floundering and fragile union of countries, has freed the sociopath Acheel. While Wiggin realizes the error of his actions, Bean and Petra are on the run to avoid Acheel's overwhelming realm of influence. Though Card's politics and beliefs permeate the narrative, none can deny his masterful storytelling, enhanced by the four narrators. While presenting different points of views and even voices within the story, they at times overlap and still perform well. Each seem to dominate a different perspective of the book. Birney's brittle voice identifies the cold calculating side of Wiggin while also imbuing at times the desperation and frustration of the aspiring world leader. Brick works best with the cool and collected Bean while De Cuir uses her stern lilting voice to embody the lead female characters. Rudnicki's deep, cold voice is the perfect choice for the almost toneless e-mails prefacing each chapter. A Tor Books paperback (Reviews, July 15, 2002). (July)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Publishers Weekly
Fans of Cards bestselling Ender series will be delighted with this tale of teen empowerment (following 2001s Shadow of the Hegemon), as the Battle School brats cope with life after the war with the Formics. Peter Wiggins, now leader of the worldwide Earth government, the Hegemon, makes a tactical error when he authorizes the rescue of his archenemy, Achilles, from the Chinese, only to discover Achilles, dangerously insane, is a Trojan Horse. Peter, along with his parents, must flee the planet temporarily, only to discover plots within plots at the site of the now dismantled Battle School. Meanwhile, Bean, accompanied by his wife, Petra, comes to terms with his body: he wont stop growing, and hes doomed to a short life. He and Petra seek out the man who manipulated his genes in order to have him create children without the same problem, only to have the embryos stolen. Bean and Petra race against time to try to rescue their unborn children while keeping Peter apprised of world events. Into this mix, Card tosses in a war, Chinese expansionism, unrest in India and a dangerously unfettered Achilles. The political becomes the personal in a final showdown between Bean and Achilles. These teens play for keeps: the world is their stage, with Battle School grads in key positions of power in China, the Muslim world and India, all ready to work together to create world peace. Card discusses important topics here"the nature of the parent-child relationship; the roles of love and service"that are implicitly part of coming of age. (On-sale Aug. 19) Forecast: A $300,000 national marketing campaign, including advertising on the Sci-Fi Channel and print advertising targeted to college and military publications, should ensure a run on bestseller lists. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This fine follow-up to Ender's Shadow features that novel's hero, Bean (now a young man), wrestling with Card's trademark: superbly real moral and ethical dilemmas. In a world between wars, filled with ambitious countries jockeying to carve up their neighbors, the children of Battle School are the strongest asset a nation can possess. The greatest of the children, "Ender" Wiggin, has gone off to colonize a new world. The second best, Bean, is hunted by a young psychopathic genius, Achilles, who schemes to conquer Earth with the aid of Ender's soldiers. Peter, Ender's brother, who was too ruthless to make it to Battle School, also works to rule the planet, but through more peaceful, political means. Bean must decide if becoming Peter's shadow and guiding him to become Hegemon will help defeat Achilles, and if one boy's megalomania will make a better world than another's. Children playing at war as if it were a game recalls Card's most famous work, Ender's Game, which won both a Hugo and a Nebula award. The complexity and serious treatment of the book's young protagonists will attract many sophisticated YA readers, while Card's impeccable prose, fast pacing and political intrigue will appeal to adult fans of spy novels, thrillers and science fiction. (Jan. 2) Forecast: Card is immensely popular; this is one of his best novels. Like Ender's Game, it will soar on genre lists and should flirt with, and perhaps woo, regular lists. Tor will ensure this through a $300,000 ad/promo campaign including a nine-city author tour. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
VOYA
This book can be read without reading the book right before it, but there are parts where you feel as if you came for the second half of the joke. There were times when I didn't really agree with Card's thinking on the whole political situation and the handling of it. To say the very least, this book was good, although not to the same standard as Ender's Game or Ender's Shadow. It is more mature. The tone evolves as the characters grow up, which is a relief. All the little side plots are enjoyable and tied in neatly at the end. The best part of this book is how all the minor characters gained more depth. VOYA CODES: 4Q 4P S A/YA (Better than most, marred only by occasional lapses; Broad general YA appeal; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12; Adult and Young Adult). 2002, Tor, 352p,
— Eman Ashrafi, Teen Reviewer
KLIATT
The sequel to Shadow of the Hegemon, this story picks up with Ender's older brother Peter Wiggin as the Hegemon leader of the world. Trying to limit the influence of the evil Achilles, Peter has him taken out of China only to find that Achilles has leveraged his proximity to Peter and his group to facilitate a coup. Two of Peter's main supporters have to stay in hiding: a growing giant and warrior named Bean, and his love Petra (also the center of attraction to Achilles). Peter seems like a reluctant leader, needing to be nudged by his parents. On the other hand, Bean has a hard time doing nothing. Both act like shadow puppets being pulled by Achilles' invisible strings. This volume does not have the stature of Card's original Ender fantasies. While the characters move around a lot, and find their Battle School friends in new positions, the pacing seems strangely plodding. It's hard to tell the maturity of the characters, and that vagueness does not help the reader understand personality development easily. While the main message supports inclusion and pluralism in terms of politics and religion, violence continues to have its place. (Ender Series, Book 7). KLIATT Codes: SA-Recommended for senior high school students, advanced students, and adults. 2002, Tor, 375p., Ages 15 to adult.
— Dr. Lesley S.J. Farmer
Library Journal
In the aftermath of the war against the alien insectoid Formics, the people of Earth experienced a period of unity under the benevolent rulership of the Hegemon Peter Wiggin, brother of war hero Ender Wiggin. As the fragile political peace erodes and internal wars threaten to erupt, the child-warriors of the Battle School now young adults skilled in the arts of leadership and politics struggle to bring about a new kind of peace despite the efforts of traitors in their midst. The sequel to Ender's Shadow and Shadow of the Hegemon continues Card's visionary future history with a story of men and women thrust too early into positions of power. The author's thoughtful storytelling and compassionately moral characters make this a good addition to most sf collections. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
School Library Journal
Adult/High School-No wonder smart kids love the Ender saga so much: Card's young heroes are not just consistently smarter than adults, they are Masters of the Universe. This sequel to Ender's Shadow (Tor, 1999) finds the wars over, with Ender in self-imposed exile off-planet. The remaining students of Battle School, now young teens, are trying to adjust to their civilian status when they are suddenly abducted-all except Bean, who escapes and goes into hiding with Sister Carlotta, the nun who raised him. Concluding that the mastermind behind the kidnapping is none other than Achilles, a homicidal megalomaniac from his past, Bean forms an uneasy alliance with Peter Wiggin, the most respected political mind in the world. With the help of coded messages from Bean's old friend Petra (now Achilles's prisoner), Bean and Peter close in on the villain, changing the paths of world powers on their way. Fans of the series will continue to overlook the implausibility of whole countries being turned over to teenagers who proclaim to know it all, but might be a bit disappointed in Peter as the good-guy candidate for ruler of the world. Achilles, a sort of evil James Bond, is the more interesting of the two, but that is typical of the moral dilemmas Card suggests to his readers. With two books still to come about Bean, it would be wise to stock up on all Card's books; enthusiasts may want to revisit the earlier stories while waiting for the next installment.-Jan Tarasovic, West Springfield High School, Fairfax County, VA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Card's child-warrior saga (Shadow of the Hegemon, 2001, etc.) goes on . . . and on. The brilliant child-warrior Bean has helped the equally youthful essayist-advisor Peter Wiggin become Hegemon, but it's a title with little power, carrying influence only within enfeebled America and Europe, and the struggle to direct the soul of the world continues. Their adversary, the megalomaniac Achilles, having befriended and betrayed Russia and India in turn, has guided the Chinese to conquer India and Indochina. Now Bean and Peter receive word that the Chinese have lost patience with their psychotic ally and have arrested him. Peter, believing that he can both dominate their foe and learn from him, arranges to capture Achilles-and soon Achilles is pretty much running the Hegemony. Bean, withdrawing from Peter's side, agrees to start a family with his Battle School graduate companion, Petra, stipulating that none of the offspring carry Anton's Key in their genes: the twist that both makes him a genius and dooms him to an early death. Knowing that Achilles will attempt to kill them both, and steal their embryos, Bean seeks refuge with a powerful, friendly Muslim, while Peter's parents endeavor to persuade the stubborn, willful Hegemon that his position is precarious. The usual welter of plotting, maneuvers, repartee, and philosophy. Unfortunately, much of it has the feel of a primer on how to grow up-and Card is much less endearing when he's writing for children rather than about them. $300,000 ad/promo
From the Publisher
“The ideal presentation of any book of mine is to have excellent actors perform it in audio format.” —Orson Scott Card from the afterword of Ender’s Game

“The folks at Audio Renaissance have quite literally brought greatness to the text. They’ve included an introduction and a postscript read by Card himself, both of which place the novel and the audiobook in its context as well as enlightening us to the author’s method of its construction. Multiple readers led by Stefan Rudnicki work perfectly to vocally illustrate each chapter, character and scene.” —Science Fiction and Fantasy on Ender’s Game(A Science Fiction and Fantasy Essential)

 

"David Birney's voice sounds purposefully fatigued, beautifully conveying the world leader Peter Wiggin's frustrated resignation, and Stefan Rudnicki's clipped, low baritone is perfect for the cloack-and-dagger email correspondence that bookends the chapters.  Gabrielle de Cuir expertly handles both accents and emotion...[Scott Brick] tackles the Bean chapters with the youthful cynicism and passion that Bean embodies in this book, capturing the character's voice with wonderful passion.  These four narrators come together to create a wholly satisfying and engrossing listening experience." - AudioFile

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780765340054
  • Publisher: Doherty, Tom Associates, LLC
  • Publication date: 6/1/2003
  • Series: Ender's Shadow Series , #3
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 384
  • Sales rank: 85,731
  • Product dimensions: 6.74 (w) x 10.90 (h) x 1.04 (d)

Meet the Author

Orson Scott Card

Orson Scott Card is best known for his science fiction novel Ender's Game and it’s many sequels that expand the Ender Universe into the far future and the near past.  Those books are organized into the Ender Quintet, the five books that chronicle the life of Ender Wiggin; the Shadow Series, that follows on the novel Ender’s Shadow and are set on Earth; and the Formic Wars series, written with co-author Aaron Johnston, that tells of the terrible first contact between humans and the alien “Buggers”.

Card has been a working writer since the 1970s. Beginning with dozens of plays and musical comedies produced in the 1960s and 70s, Card's first published fiction appeared in 1977 — the short story "Gert Fram" in the July issue of The Ensign, and the novelet version of "Ender's Game" in the August issue of Analog.

 

The novel-length version of Ender’s Game, published in 1984 and continuously in print since then, became the basis of  the 2013 film, starring Asa Butterfield, Harrison Ford, Ben Kingsley, Hailee Steinfeld, Viola Davis, and Abigail Breslin.

 

Card was born in Washington state, and grew up in California, Arizona, and Utah. He served a mission for the LDS Church in Brazil in the early 1970s. Besides his writing, he runs occasional writers’ workshops and directs plays. He frequently teaches writing and literature courses at Southern Virginia University.

He is the author many sf and fantasy novels, including the American frontier fantasy series “The Tales of Alvin Maker” (beginning with Seventh Son), There are also stand-alone science fiction and fantasy novels like Pastwatch and Hart’s Hope. He has collaborated with his daughter Emily Card on a manga series, Laddertop. He has also written contemporary thrillers like Empire and historical novels like the monumental Saints and the religious novels Sarah and Rachel and Leah. Card’s recent work includes the Mithermages books (Lost Gate, Gate Thief), contemporary magical fantasy for readers both young and old.  

 

Card lives in Greensboro, North Carolina, with his wife, Kristine Allen Card,  He and Kristine are the parents of five children and several grandchildren.

Biography

Any discussion of Orson Scott Card's work must necessarily begin with religion. A devout Mormon, Card believes in imparting moral lessons through his fiction, a stance that sometimes creates controversy on both sides of the fence. Some Mormons have objected to the violence in his books as being antithetical to the Mormon message, while his conservative political activism has gotten him into hot water with liberal readers.

Whether you agree with his personal views or not, Card's fiction can be enjoyed on many different levels. And with the amount of work he's produced, there is something to fit the tastes of readers of all ages and stripes. Averaging two novels a year since 1979, Card has also managed to find the time to write hundreds of audio plays and short stories, several stage plays, a television series concept, and a screenplay of his classic novel Ender's Game. In addition to his science fiction and fantasy novels, he has also written contemporary fiction, religious, and nonfiction works.

Card's novel that has arguably had the biggest impact is 1985's Hugo and Nebula award-winner Ender's Game. Ender's Game introduced readers to Andrew "Ender" Wiggin, a young genius faced with the task of saving the Earth. Ender's Game is that rare work of fiction that strikes a chord with adults and young adult readers alike. The sequel, Speaker for the Dead, also won the Hugo and Nebula awards, making Card the only author in history to win both prestigious science-fiction awards two years in a row.

In 2000, Card returned to Ender's world with a "parallel" novel called Ender's Shadow. Ender's Shadow retells the events of Ender's Game from the perspective of Julian "Bean" Delphinki, Ender's second-in-command. As Sam to Ender's Frodo, Bean is doomed to be remembered as an also-ran next to the legendary protagonist of the earlier novel. In many ways, Bean is a more complex and intriguing character than the preternaturally brilliant Ender, and his alternate take on the events of Ender's Game provide an intriguing counterpoint to fans of the original series.

In addition to moral issues, a strong sense of family pervades Card's work. Card is a devoted family man and father to five (!) children. In the age of dysfunctional family literature, Card bristles at the suggestion that a positive home life is uninteresting. "How do you keep ‘good parents' from being boring?" he once said. "Well, in truth, the real problem is, how do you keep bad parents from being boring? I've seen the same bad parents in so many books and movies that I'm tired of them."

Critical appreciation for Card's work often points to the intriguing plotlines and deft characterizations that are on display in Card's most accomplished novels. Card developed the ability to write believable characters and page-turning plots as a college theater student. To this day, when he writes, Card always thinks of the audience first. "It's the best training in the world for a writer, to have a live audience," he says. "I'm constantly shaping the story so the audience will know why they should care about what's going on."

Card brought Bean back in 2005 for the fourth and final novel in the Shadow series: Shadow of the Giant. The novel presented some difficulty for the writer. Characters who were relatively unimportant when the series began had moved to the forefront, and as a result, Card knew that the ending he had originally envisioned would not be enough to satisfy the series' fans.

Although the Ender and Shadow series deal with politics, Card likes to keep his personal political opinions out of his fiction. He tries to present the governments of futuristic Earth as realistically as possible without drawing direct analogies to our current political climate. This distance that Card maintains between the real world and his fictional worlds helps give his novels a lasting and universal appeal.

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    1. Hometown:
      Greensboro, North Carolina
    1. Date of Birth:
      August 24, 1951
    2. Place of Birth:
      Richland, Washington
    1. Education:
      B.A. in theater, Brigham Young University, 1975; M.A. in English, University of Utah, 1981
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Bean stood on the grass where two assault choppers were waiting for his men to board. Today the mission was a dangerous one — to penetrate Chinese air space and intercept a small convoy transporting a prisoner from Beijing toward the interior. Everything depended on secrecy, surprise, and the extraordinarily accurate information the Hegemon, Peter Wiggin, had been receiving from inside China in the past few months.

Bean wished he knew the source of the intelligence, because his life and the lives of his men depended on it. The accuracy up to now could easily have been a set-up. Even though "Hegemon" was essentially an empty title now, since most of the world's population resided in countries that had withdrawn their recognition of the authority of the office, Peter Wiggin had been using Bean's soldiers well. They were a constant irritant to the newly expansionist China, inserting themselves here and there at exactly the moment most calculated to disrupt the confidence of the Chinese leadership.

The patrol boat that suddenly disappears, the helicopter that goes down, the spy operation that is abruptly rolled up, blinding the Chinese intelligence service in yet another country — officially the Chinese hadn't even accused the Hegemon of any involvement in such incidents, but that only meant that they didn't want to give any publicity to the Hegemon, didn't want to boost his reputation or prestige among those who feared China in these years since the conquest of India and Indochina. They almost certainly knew who was the source of their woes.

Indeed, they probably gave Bean's little force the credit for problems that were actually the ordinary accidents of life. The death of the foreign minister of a heart attack in Washington DC only minutes before meeting with the U.S. President — they might really think Peter Wiggin's reach was that long, or that he thought the Chinese foreign minister, a party hack, was worth assassinating.

And the fact that a devastating drought was in its second year in India, forcing the Chinese either to buy food on the open market or allow relief workers from Europe and the Americas into the newly captured and still rebellious subcontinent — maybe they even imagined that Peter Wiggin could control the monsoon rains.

Bean had no such illusions. Peter Wiggin had all kinds of contacts throughout the world, a collection of informants that was gradually turning into a serious network of spies, but as far as Bean could tell, Peter was still just playing a game. Oh, Peter thought it was real enough, but he had never seen what happened in the real world. He had never seen people die as a result of his orders.

Bean had, and it was not a game.

He heard his men approaching. He knew without looking that they were very close, for even here, in supposedly safe territory — an advance staging area in the mountains of Mindanao in the Philippines — they moved as silently as possible. But he also knew that he had heard them before they expected him to, for his senses had always been unusually keen. Not the physical sense organs — his ears were quite ordinary — but the ability of his brain to recognize even the slightest variation from the ambient sound. That's why he raised a hand in greeting to men who were only just emerging from the forest behind him.

He could hear the changes in their breathing — sighs, almost-silent chuckles — that told him they recognized that he had caught them again. As if it were a grownup game of Mother-May-I, and Bean always seemed to have eyes in the back of his head.

Suriyawong came up beside him as the men filed by in two columns to board the choppers, heavily laden for the mission ahead.

"Sir," said Suriyawong.

That made Bean turn. Suriyawong never called him "sir."

His second-in-command, a Thai only a few years older than Bean, was now half a head shorter. He saluted Bean, and then turned toward the forest he had just come from.

When Bean turned to face the same direction, he saw Peter Wiggin, the Hegemon of Earth, the brother of Ender Wiggin who saved the world from the formic invasion only a few years before —Peter Wiggin, the conniver and gamesman. What was he playing at now?

"I hope you aren't insane enough to be coming along on this mission," said Bean.

"What a cheery greeting," said Peter. "That is a gun in your pocket, so I guess you aren't happy to see me."

Bean hated Peter most when Peter tried to banter. So he said nothing. Waited.

"Julian Delphiki, there's been a change of plans," said Peter.

Calling him by his full name, as if he were Bean's father. Well, Bean had a father — even if he didn't know he had one until after the war was over, and they told him that Nikolai Delphiki wasn't just his friend, he was his brother. But having a father and mother show up when you're eleven isn't the same as growing up with them. No one had called Bean "Julian Delphiki" when he was little. No one had called him anything at all, until they tauntingly called him Bean on the streets of Rotterdam.

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Table of Contents

I. VOLUNTEERS 9
1. Petra 11
2. Bean 23
3. Message in a Bottle 33
4. Custody 47
5. Ambition 59
II. ALLIANCES 73
6. Code 75
7. Going Public 95
8. Bread Van 107
9. Communing with the Dead 131
10. Brothers in Arms 159
III. MANEUVERS 181
11. Bangkok 183
12. Islamabad 197
13. Warnings 211
14. Hyderabad 239
15. Murder 267
IV. DECISIONS 287
16. Treachery 289
17. On a Bridge 301
18. Satyagraha 317
19. Rescue 331
20.Hegemon 345
Afterword 359
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 164 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 164 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2002

    The Bean and Petra Love Story

    Shadow Puppets is a good book. Not as good as Shadow of the Hegemon. The book gets way too mushy and lovey dovey at times. Card spends an exorbident amount of time with Petra trying to convince Bean that he should impregnate her, and just when you think Bean is going to put his foot down for good, he is persuaded by an old man who, in a way, helped to create him. Durring Bean's persuasion to have children, it seems as if Card is preaching to people that thier only as good as their progeny, and are nothing if they do not bequeath upon the earth their offspring. The rest of the book is very good, bordering on excellent, with the exception that Card should have expanded on Virlomi's and Suri's roles. They were so important in Shadow of the Hegemon, and then they took such a back seat position. A must read for Card fans.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2002

    Sad to read a book so poor from Card

    I hate to have to write a review for this book but I feel it is necessary. I have been a fan of Orson Scott Card for years and have ready everything that he has written. Unfortunately this book is a serious disappointment in both plot and, more pointedly, in dialogue. As the Battle School children are getting older they sound more and more like spolied children. Card should focus on his 'genius child' theme and avoid the children as they grow up, and should certainly avoid trying to write romance in any way shape or form. His moralization sounds weak and his characters are no longer believeable.Of course, even with this book being a bomb and it looking like the entire series has fizzled out, I still would recommend reading this book if you have gotten this far in the series. You wont like it, but how could you avoid reading it?

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2005

    Not bad...

    Early on while reading 'Shadow Puppets,' the 7th volume in the Ender series (even if Ender never actually appears within its pages), I started thinking that Orson Scott Card had written what would have been called, in the old days, a potboiler. But in contemporary terms it might be closer to the mark to think that Uncle Orson has started putting Geoffrey, Emily, and Zina through college. I also assumed that following up on 'Ender's Shadow' and 'Shadow of the Hegemon,' this latest novel would complete the 'Bean Trilogy' and resolve the conflict between Bean and Achilles. However, this is something that 'Shadow Puppets' does and does not do. Certainly that is one of the threads of the this novel, as is the mortality of Bean's existence, his relationship with Petra, and Peter's efforts as Hegemon to stave off further Chinese incursions around the globe. But although we keep returning to Bean and Petra I never really get the feeling they are the true focus of the story. There are are a lot more players this time around in Uncle Orson's story, and actually the ones I found most interesting where John Paul and Theresa Wiggin, who finally prove to us once and for all where their three mega-children got their talents and abilities. Card worries in his afterward that he was making too many previous minor characters (i.e., battle school veterans) more prominent in this story, but I actually found that to be one of the better things about 'Shadow Puppets'; I especially liked Virlomi's simple but effective way of creating a spirit of resistance in India. Ultimately, I found 'Shadow Puppets' intriguing. Card finished writing this novel during the war in Afghanistan and his thoughts on what Islam might look like in the future and the honorable way to fight a war are quite interesting. This underscores Card's strength as a writer, that even when it seems he is telling a story in which not much happens, he still offers food for thought. There is a lot in here about families and familial relationships.The books ends with a bang, if you will, instead of a whimper, but it is not a big bang, which is certainly in keeping with Card's tendency toward underplayed conclusions: the ending is never the big moment you have been awaiting, but rather with how you live with the aftermath of the big moment once it is done. Granted, this is the least of the novels in the Ender series, and a minor effort from Card all things considered. But we are still talking Uncle Orson here, and even in his lesser works he never totally disappoints his readers.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2004

    Card doesn't quite hold to his regular standards

    I found that I couldn't really connect with the characters much at all in this book; something I've never been able to not do in Mr. Card's novels. I think if he had fleshed out the story more it would have been a much better book. Instead it feels rushed and not on the same level as Ender's Shadow or Shadow of the Hegemon.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 16, 2003

    Overall Enjoyable

    Shadow Puppets has once again provided a compelling read for Ender fans, especially those who enjoy the Bean/Petra pairing. Any romantic will enjoy the couple's early bantering and later romance (which is extremely PG-rated). However, there are some problems, for example, I agree that Virlomi and Suri should have been used more- OSC opens a new plotline with Suri's infatuation with Virlomi and never carries it through. On the other hand, the political aspects of the book are interesting and do not so much take a negative view of China but show that any nation, no matter its history or prestiege, can become an aggressor in certain circumstances. A brilliant touch is Peter's relationship with his parents being strengthened and Peter's subsequent change- for the first time Peter Wiggin shows the ability to unite the world, (with his parents support). All in all, an addition that deserves a place on the shelf, if not with Ender's Game itself, then certainly with Ender's Shadow and Shadow of the Hegemon.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2003

    I disagree with the others.

    In this novel the author, Orson Scott Card, focuses on secondary characters from ENDER'S GAME. ................ Peter Wiggin (a.k.a. the Hegemon, among other alias names), Julian Delphiki (a.k.a. "Bean"), and Petra Arkanian must deal with Achilles de Flandres. Achilles, if you recall from the previous books, was a genius. Mentally, however, he was very unstable. He wanted nothing more than the deaths of Peter, Bean, and Petra. Second on Achilles's list of things-to-do was to conquer all, starting with the Hegemony! ............ Suriyawong, Virlomi, Hyrum Graff, and Volescu appear as secondary characters. They were not just for show or used as "fillers" though. Each had vital roles in the book and possibly in the next. (My hope springs eternal.) .............. ***** If you have not read the previous books, I highly recommend that you begin at the beginning, with ENDER'S GAME. Not only because all in this series is fantastic, but also because you when previous characters or events are mentioned, you would totally understand the reference and feel more a part of Card's vast universe. This author does not insult the intelligence of his readers; therefore, he will not go into deep detail on past events. He just mentions a person or event and carries on with the current story. I love that in an author! ................ Orson Scott Card made a fan of me with ENDER'S GAME. Of course, since I enjoyed it so much, I handed it over to my husband and the "Ender's Bug" (as I call it) bit him too. Card quickly made his way from my list of "Good Authors", to my list of "Favorite Authors", and currently resides on my "Elite List" which contains only four names (and one of them are deceased). I tell you that so you may understand that I do NOT consider myself to be overly dramatic when I say, "If you love Sci-Fi, you MUST read this series!" .......... Orson Scott Card rules the Sci-Fi universe! ***** REVIEWED BY DETRA FITCH

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2003

    Good Plots, Good Book

    Shadow Puppets is a good book and I would recommend it to anyone. The plotline is good and there is the underlying Bean and Petra line. The subplot is almost more interesting than the real plot, but the climax more that makes up for the lack of action. If you're a fan of fast paced, action-packed books don't read this. If you enjoy a more intellectual read every now and then and enjoy being forced to think about what you are reading then get in your car right now and pick up this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    interesting side installment in the Ender¿s Earth series

    Ender Wiggins led the victory over the Formics, but his brother Peter is named the Hegemon, leader of the waning worldwide government, a victim of its own success. Peter learns that the Chinese are afraid and weary of his rival Achilles, who has helped them expand their boundaries. They incarcerate the dangerous Achilles, but Peter rescues his enemy only to realize rather quickly that his foe is crazier, deadlier, and more devious than he imagined. Achilles takes power from Peter. <P>Peter¿s strongest ally Bean leaves to start a family with Petra before he dies, which is sooner than later. Bean and Petra agree that their children will not carry Anton's Key in their genes, as that is what is causing Bean¿s premature death. However, Achilles has his own plans for these unborn offsprings that include speeding up the deaths of the parents. <P>SHADOW PUPPETS is an interesting side installment in the Ender¿s Earth series though the title character is not the prime player as this novel focuses on Peter, Bean, and Petra. The story line is loaded with action and philosophy with Orson Scott Card contemplating the relationships between parents and children, among siblings, friends, and lovers, and amidst major religions. Though at times pontificating over the need of servicing one¿s community, the latest entry in this popular series proves the author still holds four aces when it comes to engaging the reader. <P>Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2002

    A worthy novel in an amazing series.

    While in my opinion, OSC has taken a step backwards while writing the Shadow books (a parallel series to Ender's Game, and its sequels), I found this book very interesting. I didn't like Shadow of the Hegemon (the 2nd book in the Bean saga) very much, I found this one to fix everything that was wrong in it. Shadow of the Hegemon, was flawed because the premise behind the story seemed so unbelievable. In a real world, a character such as Achilles would not be able to manipulate the world as he did in Shadow of the Hegemon. He wouldn't be able to even get a meeting with a high ranking official. Shadow Puppets however, revolves around greed, and how ones greed can come up to hurt that individual. Greed is a very real situation, and its common in governments around the world, so the premise itself for Shadow Puppets, was already an improvement over Shadow of the Hegemon. The improvements of course, did not stop there. This book included everything you come to expect from a book from Orson Scott Card, internal struggle, dealing with death, dealing with change, and most of all getting to know yourself (something we all are constantly doing). I've read complaints about Bean and Petra 'growing up too fast', but I think that these people fail to realize how much dealing with death changes a person. There isn't a person out there, who has gone un-touched by death, nor is there a person who was unchanged by their experiences. Shadow Puppets was a great book, and a great improvement over Shadow of the Hegemon (which was still a good book). If you are a fan of Card's this is a must read. If you are a fan of sci fi in general, this is a good read. But most of all, if you enjoy fast moving, but deep stories, this book is for you. While its not as deep as Ender's Game (or any of its sequels) there are still passages that make one think. I highly reccomend this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 19, 2014

    Prear

    Changes

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2014

    Excellent

    This is a fantastic book with an ending that I've wanted to see for a long time. :D

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2014

    Hey a little advice over here

    I dont know if i should read... Someone commented on what petra was trying for bean to do and... i dont know. Rest of series was AWESOME(x10000) but... need help :please respond. BTW the 5 stars is for the rest of the series if you havent read ender's game-read it!(its very moving!) :)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2014

    You should read

    You should it is moving and you would be missing out if you have read the Ender's Game series and not this book =]

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  • Posted August 26, 2013

    I love this series

    Read the Ender's Game series first

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  • Posted April 26, 2013

    Recommended

    Really moving book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2012

    Battle School Slang Sucks

    Oh and for Christ's sake, Card, stop that "Battle School slang" stuff. I winced each time I read "jeesh".

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    Shadow puppets

    This book will make a great movie someday!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2005

    Best Book I've ever read!

    I just love how Card describes details! He inspires me to read more of his books! It's just so exciting to read Bean's a.k.a Julian Delphiki and Petra Arkanian's dilemmas. I recommend this book to everyone and Orson Scott Card's Fans!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2005

    Disagree

    I think that this book is marvelously written. It is amazing how well Mr. Card knows world events. I think most people who rated this four stars rated it that because this is so new to the genre. The characters we all know and love as children are getting older. And this is m reasoning for why people cannot relate.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 17, 2003

    A Good Read

    Shawdow Puppets is the 7th installment in the Ender's Game series. The Third in the Ender's Shadow series. This book follows the paths of Julian Delphiki a.k.a. 'Bean' and Petra Arkanian. In Shadow Puppets Bean and Petra decide to try and have a kid, despite the fact of the Anton's Key, an altered gene found in Bean, would posses a danger for the children. This book has the usual Orson Scott Card writing all over it with, hard ethical dilemmas, and great story telling. I recommend it to anyone.

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