Shady Grove

Shady Grove

4.0 2
by Jerry Garcia
     
 

When Jerry Garcia died suddenly, in 1995, one of the first recordings that came along to offer any real solace was Shady Grove. The Garcia who ambled over to "Dawg" Grisman's Marin County studio to jam in all styles of music from 1990 to '95 came alive again, musically speaking. And the vitality he displays on "Stealin," "Jackaroo," "Casey Jones" (no, not theSee more details below

Overview

When Jerry Garcia died suddenly, in 1995, one of the first recordings that came along to offer any real solace was Shady Grove. The Garcia who ambled over to "Dawg" Grisman's Marin County studio to jam in all styles of music from 1990 to '95 came alive again, musically speaking. And the vitality he displays on "Stealin," "Jackaroo," "Casey Jones" (no, not the Grateful Dead song -- it's an old blues tune), and the title track underscores the sad reality that he's gone. Garcia, of course, began his career playing folk, bluegrass, and old-time music before moving on to the Dead, while Grisman has become one of the key artists in the "new acoustic" movement of the last 25 years. The recordings that appear on Shady Grove were made mostly for fun, something that's apparent through the album's 13 tracks. Some are more polished than others, but all are played with both a sense of adventurousness and a respect for the rich tradition of these songs. The performances themselves, to say nothing of the richly detailed liner notes, offer one hell of an education in American roots music.

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - William Ruhlmann
In the last five years of his life, Jerry Garcia frequently dropped in on his old friend, mandolin player David Grisman, to play and record the kind of folk, bluegrass, and old-timey music they had both begun their careers with in the early '60s. Grisman released two Garcia/Grisman albums on his Acoustic Disc label during Garcia's lifetime, and this is the first to be compiled since his death. In a note, Grisman writes, "I decided to organize this material by genre; this first volume is comprised of traditional folk songs and ballads." Indeed, among the 13 tracks here are versions of children's ballads and other ancient songs that formed the repertoire of some of the folk groups that both players belonged to. Grisman has included a lavish CD booklet containing thorough annotations by New Lost City Ramblers member John Cohen that trace the origins of each of the songs and detail Garcia and Grisman's backgrounds. One gets the sense that Cohen and Grisman are trying to provide a tutorial to Deadheads who may be puzzled. The effect of all the scholarship is to imply that the sessions are more deliberate than a hearing suggests, however. The playing is loose and spontaneous, and Garcia is not always in the best voice. Nevertheless, Grisman is right to begin his documentation of Garcia's last sessions with an album that ties directly into the guitarist's initial musical passions.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/15/1996
Label:
Acoustic Disc
UPC:
0715949102127
catalogNumber:
21
Rank:
49469

Related Subjects

Tracks

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Jerry Garcia   Primary Artist,Indexed Contributor,Guitar,Vocals,5-string Banjo
Bryan Bowers   Autoharp
Joe Craven   Fiddle,Percussion
Matt Eakle   Flute
David Grisman   Guitar,Mandola,Track Performer,5-string Banjo,Mandolin Banjo
Jim Kerwin   Bass
William Scarlett   Harmonica

Technical Credits

Mickey Hart   Composer
Bob Dylan   Composer
Jerry Garcia   Composer,Producer
Bob Weir   Composer
John Cohen   Liner Notes
David Dennison   Engineer
Donna Jean Godchaux   Composer
Keith Godchaux   Composer
David Grisman   Producer,Contributor,Liner Notes
Bill Kreutzmann   Composer
Phil Lesh   Composer
Craig Miller   Executive Producer
Paul Stubblebine   Mastering
D. Brent Hauseman   Artwork
John Hurt   Composer

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