Shakespeare and Cultural Traditions: The Proceedings of the International Shakespeare Association World Congress, Tokyo, 1991

Overview

The Fifth World Shakespeare Congress, held in Tokyo in August 1991, attracted seven hundred Shakespeareans from thirty-five countries. Those contributing to the program included some of the best-known critics and scholars working today in the field of Shakespeare studies. A selection of the many stimulating papers given during the congress is presented here in Shakespeare and Cultural Traditions. This theme of Shakespeare and cultural traditions was explored from many angles: the cultural forces that helped shape...
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Overview

The Fifth World Shakespeare Congress, held in Tokyo in August 1991, attracted seven hundred Shakespeareans from thirty-five countries. Those contributing to the program included some of the best-known critics and scholars working today in the field of Shakespeare studies. A selection of the many stimulating papers given during the congress is presented here in Shakespeare and Cultural Traditions. This theme of Shakespeare and cultural traditions was explored from many angles: the cultural forces that helped shape Shakespeare's work in his own time: the assimilation of Shakespeare by other cultures through translation and theatre performances: the creative influence of the plays on other cultural media such as opera and film: and interpretations of Shakespeare from late-twentieth-century viewpoints including the psychoanalytical, the political, the feminist, and the new historical. The lectures delivered by the four plenary speakers of the congress are published here: Stephen Greenblatt's groundbreaking paper on witchcraft and Macbeth: Germaine Greer's perceptive analysis of the presence of the proletariat in Shakespeare's plays: Ruth Nevo's intriguing exploration of Freudian perspectives on Hamlet; and Takashi Sasayama's important comparative study of tragedy and emotion in Shakespeare and Chikamatsu. This volume also includes papers by other Shakespearean scholars of international reputation, offering fresh insights into many topics of interest. Among them are John Russell Brown on "Shakespeare's Plays and Traditions of Playgoing"; Sukanta Chaudhuri on "Shakespeare and the Ethnic Question"; Werner Habicht on the German Shakespeare tradition; Alexander Leggatt on bearbaiting; Avraham Oz on The Merchant of Venice; Annabel Patterson and Taming of the Shrew; and Gary Taylor on "Bardicide." Taken together, the essays collected in Shakespeare and Cultural Traditions constitute a remarkable range of responses to Shakespeare's enduring art and offer a truly internatio
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780874134629
  • Publisher: University of Delaware Press
  • Publication date: 7/1/1994
  • Pages: 379

Table of Contents

List of Contributors 9
Acknowledgments 11
Introduction 13
Shakespeare Bewitched 17
Shakespeare and Bearbaiting 43
The Offstage Mob: Shakespeare's Proletariat 54
The Jack Cade Scenes Reconsidered: Popular Rebellion, Utopia, or Carnival? 76
The Inversion of Cultural Traditions in Shakespeare's Sonnets 90
Shakespeare in the Humanist Tradition: Skeptical Doubts and Their Expression in Paradoxes 99
A Caliban in St. Mildred Poultry 110
Shakespeare's Will and Testamentary Traditions 127
Tragedy and Emotion: Shakespeare and Chikamatsu 138
"Which Is the Merchant Here? And Which the Jew?": Riddles of Identity in The Merchant of Venice 155
Shakespeare and the Ethnic Question 174
Shakespeare Imagines the Orient: The Orient Imagines Shakespeare 188
Shakespeare's Australian Travels 205
Voices and Silences in Shakespeare's Plays: A View from a Different Cultural Tradition 216
"I Know Not What You Mean by That": Shakespeare in Different Cultural Contexts 223
Shakespeare, Ibsen, and Rome: A Study in Cultural Transmission 229
Romanticism, Antiromanticism, and the German Shakespeare Tradition 243
Shakespeare's Plays and Traditions of Playgoing 253
Fire in the Theater: A Cross-cultural Code 266
Shakespeare as Liberator: Macbeth in Czechoslovakia 274
Hamlet at World's End: Heiner Muller's Production in East Berlin 280
Political Shakespeare: West Germany, 1970-1990 285
King Lear in the Opera House 295
Framing The Taming 304
Nicholas Rowe and the Twentieth-Century Shakespeare Text 314
Locating Texts in History 323
Bardicide 333
Mousetrap and Rat Man: An Uncanny Resemblance 350
Appendix A: Complete List of Papers from the Program of the Congress 364
Appendix B: Seminars, Forums, and Their Leaders 367
Index 369
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