Shakespeare And Stratford-Upon-Avon

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
73 THE FORMER JUBILEES. GAERICK'S: 1769. The first jubilee in honour of Shakespeare, which took place at Stratford-upon-Avon, in 1769, is generally called " Garrick's." He originated and carried ont that much ridiculed—somewhat ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
73 THE FORMER JUBILEES. GAERICK'S: 1769. The first jubilee in honour of Shakespeare, which took place at Stratford-upon-Avon, in 1769, is generally called " Garrick's." He originated and carried ont that much ridiculed—somewhat unfortunate—but, on the whole, successful and praiseworthy celebration. Garrick had been at that time no less than twenty-eight years on the stage, un- precedentedly successful as actor and manager. He was not a profound student of Shakespeare, nor had he unqualified reverence for his genius. In compliment to the greatest if not only detractor of Shakespeare in the literary world —Voltaire—he maimed " Hamlet" by cutting out the grave scene and "burking" Osric. The rapidity and intensity of his style enabled him to give a novel and spirited picture of Richard and his wonderful mimetic faculties account to me largely for the effects he created in Lear; but as a tragedian, in the strict sense of the term, he was almost as mentally dwarfed as he was physically stunted, however otherwise his biographers, the Irish dramatist and barrister, Murphy, or " the author," as Johnson said, " engendered from the corruption of a bookseller," Davies, may describe hi-m. He had not the dignity of Quin, the power of Mossop, or the physical endowments of- Barry. Certainly he was nowhere with Barry in Othello, and came up to him in only the banishment scene of Bomeo. His Hamlet, I feel persuaded, was not equal to that of Betterton or Charles Mayne Young, or hisMacbeth to that of William Charles Macready. This, I am aware, is not the traditional opinion of Garrick in tragedy, and acting will, it is true, ever be a matter of opinion, even amongst those who judge from personal knowledge, whilst it is almost impossible from descriptions in books to form a positive notio...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781164176275
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 9/10/2010
  • Pages: 280
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 6.00 (h) x 0.59 (d)

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73 THE FORMER JUBILEES. GAERICK'S: 1769. The first jubilee in honour of Shakespeare, which took place at Stratford-upon-Avon, in 1769, is generally called " Garrick's." He originated and carried ont that much ridiculed somewhat unfortunate but, on the whole, successful and praiseworthy celebration. Garrick had been at that time no less than twenty-eight years on the stage, un- precedentedly successful as actor and manager. He was not a profound student of Shakespeare, nor had he unqualified reverence for his genius. In compliment to the greatest if not only detractor of Shakespeare in the literary world Voltaire he maimed " Hamlet" by cutting out the grave scene and "burking" Osric. The rapidity and intensity of his style enabled him to give a novel and spirited picture of Richard and his wonderful mimetic faculties account to me largely for the effects he created in Lear; but as a tragedian, in the strict sense of the term, he was almost as mentally dwarfed as he was physically stunted, however otherwise his biographers, the Irish dramatist and barrister, Murphy, or " the author," as Johnson said, " engendered from the corruption of a bookseller," Davies, may describe hi-m. He had not the dignity of Quin, the power of Mossop, or the physical endowments of- Barry. Certainly he was nowhere with Barry in Othello, and came up to him in only the banishment scene of Bomeo. His Hamlet, I feel persuaded, was not equal to that of Betterton or Charles Mayne Young, or his Macbeth to that of William Charles Macready. This, I am aware, is not the traditional opinion of Garrick in tragedy, and acting will, it is true, ever be a matter of opinion, even amongst those who judge from personalknowledge, whilst it is almost impossible from descriptions in books to form a positive notio...
Read More Show Less

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