Shakespeare on Toast: Getting a Taste for the Bard [NOOK Book]

Overview

Who's afraid of William Shakespeare? Just about everyone. He wrote too much and what he did write is inaccessible and elitist. Right? Wrong. "Shakespeare on Toast" knocks the stuffing from the staid old myth of Shakespeare, revealing the man and his plays for what they really are: modern, thrilling and uplifting drama. Actor and author Ben Crystal brings the bright words and colourful characters of the world's greatest hack writer brilliantly to life, handing over the key to Shakespeare's plays, unlocking the so ...

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Shakespeare on Toast: Getting a Taste for the Bard

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Overview

Who's afraid of William Shakespeare? Just about everyone. He wrote too much and what he did write is inaccessible and elitist. Right? Wrong. "Shakespeare on Toast" knocks the stuffing from the staid old myth of Shakespeare, revealing the man and his plays for what they really are: modern, thrilling and uplifting drama. Actor and author Ben Crystal brings the bright words and colourful characters of the world's greatest hack writer brilliantly to life, handing over the key to Shakespeare's plays, unlocking the so called difficult bits and, astonishingly, finding Shakespeare's own voice amid the poetry. Told in five fascinating Acts, "Shakespeare on Toast" sweeps the cobwebs from the Bard - from his language, his life, his time - revealing both the man and his work to be relevant, accessible and full of beans.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
01/01/2014
Drawing on his experience as a Shakespearean actor, Crystal offers an irreverent and illuminating look at the Bard's language. He reveals how actors examine the poetic structure of the plays for clues about how to present them and provides an insightful guide to reading Shakespeare that will appeal to all readers.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781848314771
  • Publisher: Icon Books, Ltd. UK
  • Publication date: 6/1/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Ben Crystal is an actor and writer. He has worked in TV, film and theatre, including the reconstructed Shakespeare's Globe, London, and is a narrator for RNIB Talking Books, Channel 4 and the BBC. He co-wrote Shakespeare's Words (Penguin 2002) and The Shakespeare Miscellany (Penguin 2005) with David Crystal, and regularly gives talks and workshops on Shakespeare.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 5, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    Shakespeare on Toast was published by Icon Books on September 11

    Shakespeare on Toast was published by Icon Books on September 11, 2012. Ben Crystal is an English actor/author who has been interviewed by many news agencies about his work with Shakespeare. His previous publications include two books co-authored by his father David Crystal: Shakespeare’s Words (Penguin, 2002) and The Shakespeare Miscellany (Penguin, 2005).

    Ben Crystal‘s new book, Shakespeare on Toast: Getting a Taste for the Bard helps people connect with Shakespeare on a really not-intimidating level. In the prologue to the book, Crystal states that it is not an “actorly” book full of stories about acting Shakespeare, nor is it a scholarly book. Basically, like beans on toast, he makes Shakespeare palatable to the wider public in a really simple way.

    “[Shakespeare is] only Literature-with-a-capital-L until you put him back into context as an Elizabethan writer, not a 21st-century idol” (11).

    This book is written in an informal style, with a down-to-earth feel to it. If you had a good high school English teacher, this is what he sounded like. Crystal “makes Shakespeare’s plays accessible without dumbing them down.” It is clear that he feels both love and respect for Shakespeare, but he contends that his interest is in the plays rather than their author. In fact, he very bluntly states, “I don’t care who really wrote Shakespeare’s plays” (16). This does not mean that Crystal doesn’t think Shakespeare was a genius, just that he is less concerned about the author’s personal life and more interested in the texts themselves. There is no doubt that this author is familiar with the history and scholarship surrounding the Bard, and he uses this knowledge to make him accessible to the rest of us.

    In addition to his informal language, Crystal employs a number of writing techniques to reach out to a younger, less scholarly audience. He uses bullet points, lists, infographics, mathematical figures and charts, and percentages to convey his information. Shakespeare is put into the wider context of history and literature as Crystal breaks down commonly held beliefs (including conspiracy theories). Also, the language of Shakespeare is decoded in a graceful manner, so that by the end of the book you wonder how you ever didn’t understand Shakespeare!

    “As for the words, well, admittedly, some of the words [Shakespeare] uses might not have been in general use for a few hundred years, but a rather cooperative 95 per cent are words we know and use every day. Hold that thought for a second: only 5 per cent of all the different words in all of Shakespeare’s plays will give you a had time” (11).

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 17, 2013

    Ben Crystal takes the seemingly complicated works of William Sha

    Ben Crystal takes the seemingly complicated works of William Shakespeare and puts them into context, breaks them down, and gives us a new perspective. The writing is light and humorous at times. Sometimes it is a bit dry, and sometimes it is a bit repetitive.

    Crystal is a little too long winded for my tastes, but I did enjoy the bits of history thrown in as it helps you understand where both Shakespeare and his audiences are coming from. I really hadn't thought about the fact that the witch hunts were going on at the time he wrote Macbeth. I also didn't know that in Shakespeare's day, plays were like soap operas. Retellings of old stories that people were familiar with and took at face value.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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