Shakespeare's Wordcraft

( 1 )

Overview

(Limelight). Written for readers who have a passion for Shakespeare, Shakespeare's Wordcraft takes a comprehensive look at Shakespeare's stellar use of language devices throughout his plays, devices he used to ink memorable lines like these:
• I must be cruel only to be kind
• Fair is foul, and foul is fair
• Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more!
• Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears! ...

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Overview

(Limelight). Written for readers who have a passion for Shakespeare, Shakespeare's Wordcraft takes a comprehensive look at Shakespeare's stellar use of language devices throughout his plays, devices he used to ink memorable lines like these:
• I must be cruel only to be kind
• Fair is foul, and foul is fair
• Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more!
• Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears! In a clear, accessible, non-academic style using plain terms, modern quotes, and several thousand examples Shakespeare's Wordcraft deftly reveals how these lasting lines were not accidental or coincidental, but designed and crafted by a master of the word.

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Editorial Reviews

KLIATT
AGERANGE: Ages 15 to adult.

Scott Kaiser, head of voice and text at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, offers an exhaustive study of the Bard’s use of literary devices. Nine chapters cover such things as omissions (unfinished thoughts, omitted nouns and verbs, swearing), substitutions (malapropism, nicknames, exaggerations, euphemism), transformations (reverse order, repeated structures), reverberations (divided couplets, repetitions), order (similes, metaphor, personification), words (prefixes, suffixes, compound words), additions (abuse, curses, superfluous words), repetitions (repeated consonants, vowels, syllables), and disorder (paradox, puns, oxymoron). Each language device is illustrated by quotes from the plays and when appropriate by modern explanations. Intended for “a student, a teacher, a director, a coach, a lover of Shakespeare, or a lover of all English literature.” Reviewer: Janet Julian
March 2008 (Vol. 42, No.2)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780879103453
  • Publisher: Hal Leonard Corporation
  • Publication date: 4/30/2007
  • Pages: 312
  • Sales rank: 1,417,593
  • Product dimensions: 7.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 22, 2009

    engaging lessons on the craft of writing from Shakespeare's plays

    Kaiser has the entertaining idea of using brief quotes from Shakespeare--hundreds and hundreds of quotes--to impart lessons for effective, occasionally memorable writing, mostly word usage and sentence structure. Thus one is treated to numerous Shakespearean quotes as examples of notable word usage and fundamental writing techniques identified by Kaiser. He names these words, additions, repetitions, reverberations, transformations, substitutions, omissions, order, and disorder. Within each of the nine chapters are several subsections for different aspects of the technique. Delayed Repetitions and Landings are two of the eight aspects under Reverberations. 'Shame, and eternal shame, nothing but shame' from 'Hamlet' is one example of the former. 'Dost thou teach pardon, pardon to destroy?' is an example from 'King Richard the Second' of Landings, explained as '[t]he last word or words of a phrase repeated as the beginning of the next phrase.' The unique writer's handbook can be studied systematically or be a bedside companion to dip into randomly for enjoyment and instruction.

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