Shalom Y'all: Images of Jewish Life in the American South

Shalom Y'all: Images of Jewish Life in the American South

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by Bill Aron, Alfred Uhry, Vicki Reikes Fox
     
 

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The kitchen of Henrietta Levine in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, where chopped liver is sautTing. Ben and Betty Lee Lamensdorf's farmland in Cary, Mississippi, where cotton, wheat, and pecans are harvested. The New Americans Social Club, a group of Holocaust survivors that meet regularly in New Orleans. The historic and flourishing Temple Emanu-El in Birmingham, Alabama.

Overview

The kitchen of Henrietta Levine in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, where chopped liver is sautTing. Ben and Betty Lee Lamensdorf's farmland in Cary, Mississippi, where cotton, wheat, and pecans are harvested. The New Americans Social Club, a group of Holocaust survivors that meet regularly in New Orleans. The historic and flourishing Temple Emanu-El in Birmingham, Alabama.

From Levy, Arkansas, to Kaplan, Louisiana, Southern Jewish culture is alive and well below the Mason-Dixon line. In Shalom Y'all, award-winning photographer Bill Aron provides a vibrant portrait of contemporary Jewish life, dutifully recording the heroic, funny, and sometimes tragic experiences of a people who have long settled in the Bible Belt.

With a moving foreword by Alfred Uhry, author of Driving Miss Daisy, this book covers all aspects of the Jewish experience, from food (chopped liver, of course, but also bagels and grits) to occupations to religious practices to friendships. Together, the text and photographs tell a story of a culture that has managed, with a mixture of good humor, perseverance, and faith, to make a home.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
For those who prefer their latkes deep-fried and who daven with a drawl, there's Shalom Y'All: Images of Jewish Life in the American South. In this thoughtful coffee-table book, Vicki Reikes Fox explores Jewish Southern life, well complemented with intriguing photographs by Bill Aron. The idea for the book emerged out of the Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience in Mississippi, and there's noble history here, as in the photos of kosher restaurants and department stores of days gone by. There's also a sense of deep, living tradition as two unique cultures merge with each other. A Mississippi woman explains the wisdom of Friday night Shabbat services ("kids can come before they go to football games"), and an Arkansas native explains her grandmother's cardinal rule that she would not eat bacon on Saturday. Driving Miss Daisy author Alfred Uhry offers a delightful foreword on growing up Jewish in the Deep South. There is so much warmth and love in this book that it feels like challah fresh from the oven-served with grits, of course. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781565123557
Publisher:
Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill
Publication date:
09/28/2002
Edition description:
1ST
Pages:
164
Sales rank:
428,822
Product dimensions:
10.34(w) x 10.40(h) x 0.65(d)

Meet the Author

Bill Aron's work is part of permanent collections in museums that include the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Art Institute of Chicago, the International Center of Photography, the Museum of Modern Art, the Jewish Museum, and the National Museum of American Jewish History. He has had over twenty solo exhibitions, has been part of over twenty-five theme exhibitions, has contributed to a number of books, and his work has been featured in many magazines and newspapers, including the New York Times, Time, Newsweek, the Washington Post, and the Los Angeles Times.

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Shalom Y'all: Images of Jewish Life in the American South 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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