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Shaman Pass (Nathan Active Series #2) [NOOK Book]

Overview

Alaska State Trooper Nathan Active is regarded as “half-white” by the Inupiats of the village where he is stationed. He was born in Chukchi but was adopted by Anglos and raised in Anchorage. Now he is called upon to investigate the murder of a tribal leader who was stabbed to death with an antique harpoon, which had been recently returned to the community under the Indian ...
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Shaman Pass (Nathan Active Series #2)

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Overview

Alaska State Trooper Nathan Active is regarded as “half-white” by the Inupiats of the village where he is stationed. He was born in Chukchi but was adopted by Anglos and raised in Anchorage. Now he is called upon to investigate the murder of a tribal leader who was stabbed to death with an antique harpoon, which had been recently returned to the community under the Indian Graves Act.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times
Even as he struggles to understand the quirky ways of modern Eskimos and comes to respect ''the cheerful fatalism with which the Inupiat seemed to arm themselves against the perplexities of life,'' Active maintains his awe of the vast Alaskan tundra, a forbidding region that Jones renders in all its bone-chilling beauty. — Marilyn Stasio
Publishers Weekly
In Jones's stirring, often moving second mystery (after 1999's White Sky, Black Ice), set in Northwest Alaska, trooper Nathan Active must solve the theft of a sacred Inupiat mummy. Well-meaning "naluaqmiut" (white men) at the Smithsonian have sent mummified "Uncle Frosty" to a museum, only to have the body stolen by villagers wishing to respect traditional native funeral customs. When a tribal elder turns up impaled on the mummy's harpoon at his lonely ice-fishing outpost, an extensive investigation follows across a vast barren area. Active tracks down a fascinating series of suspects living in isolated hunting and whaling camps and in squalid igloos, each with an intriguing story to tell. Active soon finds himself caught in a struggle between the fearsome power of "Shamans" (pagan devil doctors) and the legacy of Natchiq, a murdered prophet and social reformer. In time, the trooper and the reader achieve a deeper level of understanding of bygone traditions in a remote society where snowmobiles are replacing dogsleds and young children crave Pok mon cards. Jones skillfully depicts the beauty and desolation of the "treeless tundra" in winter as well as the hardships of survival in one of the world's most hostile climates. In the compelling ending, Active and his posse fly to a remote mountain pass to hunt for Uncle Frosty and his abductor. A handy Inupiat glossary and background history are included. (May) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
“Active maintains his awe of the vast Alaskan tundra, a forbidding region that Jones renders in all its bone-chilling beauty.”
—Marilyn Stasio, The New York Times Book Review

“[Jones’s] depiction of a freezing world of tar-paper houses and whaling camps is absolutely convincing.”
Houston Chronicle

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781569477380
  • Publisher: Soho Press, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/1/2005
  • Series: Nathan Active Series , #2
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 384,482
  • File size: 753 KB

Meet the Author

Stan Jones was born in Anchorage, where he now lives with his wife. He holds a BS from California Institute of Technology and an MA in Economic Journalism from the University of Alaska. He has worked as an award-winning reporter and editor at multiple newspapers. In addition to writing, he works to correct environmental issues, and as a former Bush pilot, has flown his own plane all over Northwest Alaska.
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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 3 of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    strong Alaskan police procedural

    Adhering to the Indian Graves Act, the Smithsonian naluaqmiut (means more than one white man) send home the mummy 'Uncle Frosty' to Alaska. Once in the northern state, villagers respecting centuries of tradition steal the body. However, not long afterward at a sheefish camp on the ice of Chukchi Bay, Inupiat tribal elder Victor Soloman is found bludgeoned to death by Frosty¿s harpoon. <P>Born in the village of Chukchi though raised in Anchorage, State Trooper Nathan Active investigates the murder. He quickly finds a herd of suspects with motives and opportunities. Nathan receives help (some unwanted) from his girlfriend and his native mother while struggling to learn and understand the matriarchal side of his heritage. Meanwhile his inquiries place Nathan in the dangerous middle of a deadly tug of war between the angatquq shamen and the followers of a murdered social reformer considered by many to be a prophet. <P>The police procedural aspects are strong and exciting, but serve as a method to enable the audience to receive a deep understanding of a people in which modern technology encroaches faster than snowmobiles drive the vast frozen tundra. Stan Jones provides a vivid picaresque scenario of surviving and residing in what would seem like a frozen wasteland, but is stark, beautiful, and more (at least as described by this author. Obviously fans of Alaskan mysteries will enjoy SHAMAN PASS, but so will anyone who appreciates an impressive who-done-it. <P>Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 11, 2003

    Shaman Pass

    This book is well written, well thought out, and the author knows what he is talking about. The characters are well developed, and the story has a flow that makes it hard to stop reading. In addition to the plot, there is also a great deal of information about northern Alaska and the Inupiat who live there. It was as much a learning experience as it was thrilling mystery. The imagery used to describe settings and situations stimulated my senses, and made me feel as if I were in the story. Jones paints a picture of the arctic winter landscape in the readers mind. I used to live in the Adirondacks of New York state's North Country, as it is called; and felt right at home with the pelting snow, subzero temperatures, and the nuances of living in hard winter weather. Overall, this is a great book that is worth reading.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing 1 – 3 of 2 Customer Reviews

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