Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior [NOOK Book]

Overview

There is a basic human wisdom that can help solve the world’s problems. It doesn’t belong to any one culture or region or religious tradition—though it can be found in many of them throughout history.
It’s what Chögyam Trungpa called the sacred path of the warrior. The sacred warrior conquers the world not through violence or aggression, but through gentleness, courage, and self-knowledge. The warrior discovers the basic goodness of human life and radiates that goodness out into...

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Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior

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Overview

There is a basic human wisdom that can help solve the world’s problems. It doesn’t belong to any one culture or region or religious tradition—though it can be found in many of them throughout history.
It’s what Chögyam Trungpa called the sacred path of the warrior. The sacred warrior conquers the world not through violence or aggression, but through gentleness, courage, and self-knowledge. The warrior discovers the basic goodness of human life and radiates that goodness out into the world for the peace and sanity of others. That’s what the Shambhala teachings are all about, and this is the book that has been presenting them to a wide and appreciative audience for more than twenty years.

The classic guide to enlightened living, in which Chogyam Trungpa presents the principles and practices of the warrior's path for Western readers, is now available in an unabridged, miniature edition. With this book, the warrior's path is opened to modern men and women in search of practical wisdom.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Trungpa's clear-headed vision shows us that celebrating life is based on appreciating ourselves. This book is a masterpiece of clarity and insight."—East West Journal

"Shambhala provides a clear depiction of the results and, thus, the reasons for meditation practice as a source of strength for daily living and spiritual growth."—Body, Mind & Spirit

"Trungpa's warrior is a most appealing figure, embodying qualities that every spiritual tradition would hold dear. The principal discipline recommended here—being genuine moment after moment—allows one to discover the magic inherent in phenomena, where the synchronization of body and mind becomes an attunement to the natural order."—Yoga Journal

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780834821200
  • Publisher: Shambhala Publications, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/28/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 227,698
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Chögyam Trungpa (1940–1987)—meditation master, teacher, and artist—founded Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, the first Buddhist-inspired university in North America; the Shambhala Training program; and an international association of meditation centers known as Shambhala International. He is the author of numerous books including Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior, Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism, and The Myth of Freedom.

The compiler and editor of The Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa, Carolyn Rose Gimian has been editing the works of Chögyam Trungpa for more than twenty-five years. She is the founding director of the Shambhala Archives, the archival repository for Chögyam Trungpa's work in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter
6: The Dawn of the Great Eastern Sun

The way of the Great Eastern Sun is based on seeing that there is a natural source of radiance and brilliance in this world—which is the innate wakefulness of human beings.

The
Dawn of the Great Eastern Sun is based on actual experience. It is not a concept. You realize that you can uplift yourself, that you can appreciate your existence as a human being. Whether you are a gas station attendant or the president of your country doesn't really matter. When you experience the goodness of being alive, you can respect who and what you are. You need not be intimidated by lots of bills to pay, diapers to change, food to cook, or papers to be filed. Fundamentally, in spite of all those responsibilities, you begin to feel that it is a worthwhile situation to be a human being, to be alive, not afraid of death.

Death comes, obviously. You can never avoid death. Whatever you do, death occurs. But if you have lived with a sense of reality and with gratitude towards life, then you leave the dignity of your life behind you, so that your relatives, your friends, and your children can appreciate who you were. The vision of the Great
Eastern Sun is based on celebrating life. It is contrasted to the setting sun,
the sun that is going down and dissolving into darkness. The setting-sun vision is based on trying to ward off the concept of death, trying to save ourselves from dying. The setting-sun point of view is based on fear. We are constantly afraid of ourselves. We feel that we can't actually hold ourselves upright. We are so ashamed of ourselves, who we are, what we are. We are ashamed of our jobs, our finances, our parental upbringing, our education, and our psychological shortcomings.

Great
Eastern Sun vision, on the other hand, is based on appreciating ourselves and appreciating our world, so it is a very gentle approach. Because we appreciate the world, we don't make a mess in it. We take care of our bodies, we take care of our minds, and we take care of our world. The world around us is regarded as very sacred, so we have to constantly serve our world and clean it up. The setting-sun vision is that washing things and cleaning up should be the domain of hired help. Or if you can't afford a housekeeper, you clean up yourself, but you regard it as dirty work. Having a nice meal is fine, but who is going to wash the dishes? We would prefer to leave that to someone else.

Thousands of tons of leftovers are discarded every year. When people go to restaurants,
often they are served giant platefuls of food, more than they can eat, to satisfy the giant desire of their minds. Their minds are stuffed just by the visual appearance of their giant steaks, their full plates. Then the leftovers are thrown into the garbage. All that food is wasted, absolutely wasted.

That is indeed a setting-sun approach. You have a giant vision, which you can't consume, and you end up throwing most of it away. There is not even a program to recycle the leftovers. Everything goes to the dump. It is no wonder we have such big problems disposing of our garbage. Some people have even thought of sending our garbage into outer space: we can let the rest of the universe take care of our leftovers, instead of cleaning up our earth. The setting-sun approach is to shield ourselves from dirt as much as we can, so that we don't have to look at it—we just get rid of anything unpleasant. As long as we have a pleasurable situation, we forget about the leftovers or the greasy spoons and plates. We leave the job of cleaning up to somebody else.

That approach produces an oppressive social hierarchy in the setting-sun world;
there are those who get rid of other people's dirt and those who take pleasure in producing the dirt. Those people who have money can continue to enjoy their food and ignore the leftovers. They can pay for luxury and ignore reality. In that way of doing things, you never see the dirt properly, and you may never see the food properly, either. Everything is compartmentalized, so you can never experience things completely. We are not talking purely about food; we are talking about everything that goes on in the setting-sun world: packaged food, packaged vacations, package deals of all kinds. There is no room to experience doubtlessness in that world; there is no room to be gentle; there is no room to experience reality fully and properly.

In contrast to that, Great Eastern Sun vision is a very ecological approach. The way of the Great Eastern Sun is based on seeing what is needed and how things happen organically. So the sense of hierarchy, or order, in the Great Eastern
Sun world is not connected with imposing arbitrary boundaries or divisions.
Great Eastern Sun hierarchy comes from seeing life as a natural process and tuning in to the uncontrived order that exists in the world. Great Eastern Sun hierarchy is based on seeing that there is a natural source of radiance and brilliance in this world—which is the innate wakefulness of human beings. The sun of human dignity can be likened to the physical sun spanning the darkness.
When you have a brilliant sun, which is a source of vision, the light from the sun shines through every window of the house, and the brightness of its light inspires you to open all the curtains. The analogy for hierarchy in the Great
Eastern Sun world is a flowering plant that grows upwards towards the sun. The analogy for setting-sun hierarchy is a lid that flattens you and keeps you in your place. In the vision of the Great Eastern Sun, even criminals can be cultivated, encouraged to grow up. In the setting-sun vision, criminals are hopeless, so they are shut off; they don't have a chance. They are part of the dirt that we would rather not see. But in the vision of the Great Eastern Sun,
no human being is a lost cause. We don't feel that we have to put a lid on anyone or anything. We are always willing to give things a chance to flower.

The basis of Great Eastern Sun vision is realizing that the world is clean and pure to begin with. There is no problem with cleaning things up, if we realize that we are just returning them to their natural, original state. It is like having your teeth cleaned. When you leave the dentist's office, your teeth feel so good. You feel as though you had a new set of teeth, but in actual fact, it is just that your teeth are clean. You realize that they are basically good teeth.

In working with ourselves, cleaning up begins by telling the truth. We have to shed any hesitation about being honest with ourselves because it might be unpleasant. If you feel bad when you come home because you had a hard day at the office, you can tell the truth about that: you feel bad. Then you don't have to try to shake off your pain by throwing it around your living room.
Instead, you can start to relax; you can be genuine at home. You can take a shower and put on fresh clothes and take some refreshment. You can change your shoes, go outside, and walk in your garden. Then, you might feel better. In fact, when you get close to the truth, you can tell the truth and feel great.

In this world, there are always possibilities of original purity because the world is clean to begin with. Dirt never comes first, at all. For example, when you buy new towels, they don't have any dirt on them. Then, as you use them, they become dirty. But you can always wash them and return them to their original state. In the same way, our entire physical and psychological existence and the world that we know—our sky, our earth, our houses, everything we have—was and is originally clean. But then, we begin to smear the situation with our conflicting emotions. Still, fundamentally speaking, our existence is all good,
and it is all launder-able. That is what we mean by basic goodness: the pure ground that is always there, waiting to be cleaned by us. We can always return to that primordial ground. That is the logic of the Great Eastern Sun.


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Table of Contents

Illustrations
xiii
Editor's
Preface
xv
Foreword
xxiii

PART
ONE

How to Be a Warrior 1

1. Creating an Enlightened Society 5

2. Discovering
Basic Goodness 18

3. The
Genuine Heart of Sadness 28

4. Fear and Fearlessness 34

5. Synchronizing
Mind and Body 39

6. The
Dawn of the Great Eastern Sun 45

7. The
Cocoon 52

8. Renunciation and Daring 59

9.
Celebrating the Journey 66

10.
Letting Go 75

PART
TWO

Sacredness:
The Warrior's World 89

11. Nowness
93

12. Discovering
Magic 103

13. How to Invoke Magic
114
14. Overcoming
Arrogance 126

15. Overcoming
Habitual Patterns 132

16. Sacred
World 138

17. Natural
Hierarchy 150

18. How to Rule 160

PART
THREE

Authentic
Presence 171

19. The
Universal Monarch
175
20. Authentic
Presence 183

21. The
Shambhala Lineage
202

Afterword by Osel Tendzin

212

Resources
219

About
the
Author
225


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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 18 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2008

    Worth Looking At

    The principals of the book are worth reading, but it was difficult to follow because of the way it was written. I would have liked to see more specifics and less analogies. It would have held my interest more if it had simply portrayed its philosophies with examples rather than being a book of examples.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2014

    Excellent

    Excellent

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  • Posted June 14, 2011

    A Classic

    This book has opened many a puritanical Christian's mind without making them losetheir religion. It's purpose is to bring the reader to a very subtle realization that nothing is as it seems, and that we truly do create our own personal reality.

    Fanciful, but always grounded, Trungpa's logic and powers of observation are basic in this book, a very much needed balm in the moral and psychological jungle that is 21st century America.

    Highly recommended.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2002

    Unleashes your dormant intellect

    I highly recommend this book to all those who seek to evolve mentally, spiritually and emotionally. I refer to this book often to remind myself that past wounds are healed not only with time but also with awareness.

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