The Shanghai Moon (Lydia Chin and Bill Smith Series #9)

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Overview

"Estranged from fellow P.I. Bill Smith, Chinese-American private investigator Lydia Chin is brought in by colleague and former mentor Joel Pilarsky to help with a case that crosses continents, cultures, and decades." "In Shanghai, excavation has unearthed a cache of European jewelry dating back to World War II, when Shanghai provided safe haven for thousands of Jews fleeing Hitler's Europe. The jewelry - the property of a young Austrian refugee - was stolen soon after it was found by a Chinese official who is suspected of having brought it to New ...
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The Shanghai Moon (Lydia Chin and Bill Smith Series #9)

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Overview

"Estranged from fellow P.I. Bill Smith, Chinese-American private investigator Lydia Chin is brought in by colleague and former mentor Joel Pilarsky to help with a case that crosses continents, cultures, and decades." "In Shanghai, excavation has unearthed a cache of European jewelry dating back to World War II, when Shanghai provided safe haven for thousands of Jews fleeing Hitler's Europe. The jewelry - the property of a young Austrian refugee - was stolen soon after it was found by a Chinese official who is suspected of having brought it to New York City to sell. Hired by a lawyer specializing in the recovery of Holocaust assets, Chin and Pilarsky are instructed to find any and all leads to the missing jewels." However, Lydia soon learns that there is much more to the story than they've been told: The Shanghai Moon, one of the world's most sought-after missing gems, reputed to be worth millions, is believed to have been part of the same stash. Before Lydia can act on this new information, a man is murdered, Lydia is fired from the case, and Bill Smith finally reappears on the scene. Now the detectives must unravel the truth about the Shanghai Moon - and the events that surrounded its disappearance sixty years ago during the chaos of war and revolution - if they are to find the killer and uncover the long-buried truth.
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Editorial Reviews

Maureen Corrigan
If Lydia and Bill's dance of attraction/distraction is a staple of this series, so are Rozan's exquisitely crafted plots…The Shanghai Moon is a standout in this series in terms of narrative sweep and the lush aura of romance…there's plenty of possibility lurking in the old missing-gems plot. It just takes a master like S.J. Rozan to restore the luster of a classic.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly

The hunt for a valuable brooch propels Edgar-winner Rozan's ninth Lydia Chin and Bill Smith nail-biter (after 2002's Winter and Night). In 1938, Rosalie Gilder, an 18-year-old Jewish refugee, left Nazi-annexed Austria for Japanese-occupied Shanghai, where she married the aristocratic Chen Kai-Rong. Chen had a jeweler create the Shanghai Moon, a brooch combining Rosalie's mother's diamonds with his ancestors' rare jade. Its disappearance during WWII interests treasure hunters in the present day. When Wong Pan, a corrupt Chinese official, steals Rosalie's jewelry box, recently unearthed in Shanghai, a Swiss asset-recovery specialist hires Joel Pilarsky, Lydia's friend and associate, to recover it in New York City, where Wong has fled in hopes of selling Rosalie's jewels on the black market. After Joel's murdered, Lydia and Bill follow a trail to Manhattan's Chinatown, where they encounter Rosalie's son and other relatives eager to recover the brooch. More surprises abound before Lydia and Bill can put the curse of the luminous Shanghai Moon to rest in Rozan's rich blend of historical mystery and contemporary suspense. Author tour. (Feb.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

After a seven-year hiatus, PIs Lydia Chin and Bill Smith are back on the mean streets of New York City. A colleague hires Lydia to find a Chinese police officer who has absconded with jewelry belonging to a Jewish refugee family who had fled to Shanghai in 1938. The man is presumed to be in New York trying to sell it. Soon other complications ensue, as another Chinese cop is found dead. Using letters and journal entries from the 1930s and 1940s, Rozan sets the stage for the modern quest for the missing valuables stolen from Jews during the Holocaust. She also gives us a brilliant look into the culture of Chinese American families today and an exciting mystery. Readers who have waited patiently for this one will not be disappointed. Highly recommended. [Library marketing; see Prepub Mystery, LJ10/1/08.]


—Jo Ann Vicarel
Kirkus Reviews
"I'm back," Lydia Chin tells her mother, and so she is, following the long hiatus since Winter and Night (2002), to track down a fabled brooch that's at the root of violence past and present. Seventy years after Rosalie Gilder and her brother Paul fled Nazi Germany for Shanghai, an excavation unearthed a cache of her jewelry, which promptly vanished again. Now Joel Pilarsky's client, Holocaust asset-recovery specialist Alice Fairchild, wants to see whether any of the pieces have turned up in New York's Chinatown, and Joel naturally thinks of his friend Lydia for the job. No sooner has Lydia established a close link between the Gilder family and the Bright Hopes jewelry store than a murder turns up the heat on her investigation and reunites Lydia with her partner Bill Smith. The fate of the Shanghai Moon, a brooch celebrating Rosalie's marriage to Chen Kai-Rong, is clearly tied to three men close to Bright Hopes: proprietor Chen Lao-li, his cousin Zhang Li and Zhang's half-brother C.D. Zhang. Persisting with her inquiries even after she's fired from the case and waving off the polite assurances she's given by Chen and the Zhangs, Lydia struggles to make sense of decades-long relationships and shifting family loyalties. She reaches a turning point when she realizes that Alice's clients are bogus-and so perhaps is the Shanghai Moon. Rozan (In This Rain, 2006, etc.) plots as expansively and ambitiously as ever, though the 1938 back story is more touching-and certainly easier to follow-than the present-day mayhem. Welcome back, Lydia and Bill.
From the Publisher
"To read S.J. Rozan is to experience the kind of pure pleasure only a master can deliver."

—Dennis Lehane

 

"With Winter and Night, S. J. Rozan paints with the full pallette of the human heart, using depth, detail, and nuance of character I haven't seen since Raymond Chandler (Yes, I mean it.)"

— Robert Crais

 

"Featuring two of my favorite characters in crime fiction, Bill Smith and Lydia Chin, Winter and Night is a chilling and compelling look at the dark roots of violence among American teens. The most intense and topical works from one of America's finest crime writers today."

— Linda Fairstein

 

"engrossing storytelling ... As 'The Shanghai Moon' demonstrates, there's plenty of possibility lurking in the old missing-gems plot. It just takes a master like S.J. Rozan to restore the luster of a classic." —Maureen Corrigan, The Washington Post

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781410415653
  • Publisher: Gale Group
  • Publication date: 6/3/2009
  • Series: Lydia Chin and Bill Smith Series , #9
  • Edition description: Large Print
  • Pages: 727
  • Product dimensions: 5.70 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

S.J. ROZAN was born and raised in the Bronx and is a long-time Manhattan resident. An architect for many years, she is now a full-time writer. Her critically acclaimed, award-winning novels and stories have won most of crime fiction's greatest honors, including the Edgar, Anthony, Shamus, Macavity and the Nero Award.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 12 of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 30, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    another fine novel

    S. J. Rozan does her usual fine job on this novel. If you enjoy a good detective novel, then this is a solid pick.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 2, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Fans will appreciate the return of the Manhattan duo as the East comes to the West in S.J. Rozan¿s tense mystery.

    In 1938 eighteen years old Jew Rosalie Gilder, carrying her mom¿s diamonds, flees Nazi Austria for Shanghai in spite of the Japanese occupation. There she marries aristocrat Chen Kai-Rong. As a show of harmony between them Chen commissions a local jeweler to create the Shanghai Moon brooch that combines the gems of his wife¿s mom with his family rare jade heirloom. The Shanghai Moon vanished during WWII.<BR/><BR/>In the present in Shanghai, Rosalie¿s jewelry box is found, but disappears again almost immediately after surfacing when Chinese government official Wong Pan steals it before fleeing to New York. A Swiss asset-recovery specialist hires Joel Pilarsky to retrieve the box assumed to be with Wong in Manhattan before he sells it to unscrupulous collectors. When Joel is murdered, his friends Lydia Chin and Bill Smith follow clues that take them to Chinatown where they run into the son of Chen and Rosalie and other family members wanting to obtain the Shanghai Moon.<BR/><BR/>It has been a few years since Chin- Smith teamed up (see REFLECTIONS IN THE SKY and WINTER AND NIGHT), but the wait was worth it. Their latest contemporary urban thriller is a fast-paced and exciting tale that comes out of the gate filled with action even before the heroes join the fray. Adding to the fun is the historical subplot re THE SHANGHAI MOON brooch that in the present has several people avariciously lusting for it; with at least one willing to kill to obtain the jewelry piece. Fans will appreciate the return of the Manhattan duo as the East comes to the West in S.J. Rozan¿s tense mystery.<BR/><BR/>Harriet Klausner

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 13, 2014

    Worth reading simple to gain a historical insight to China during WW II

    Learning there were concentration camps in China during World War II was an eye opener. Even though the letters Rosalie had written to her mother were part of the fiction, gaining an understanding that perhaps 20,000 Jews were in those camps and to some degree how they may have been treated made it well worth the read. Using those letters as clues to help solve the mystery of the Shanghai Moon became the adventure for Lydia and Bill. Murder occurs to a trusted associate Joel. Now the murderer must be found and the Shanghai Moon too will be discovered, all in the world of today. The mystery would have been more enjoyable if it had been 250 pages instead of 337.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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    Posted April 1, 2013

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