Shanghai Station

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Overview

A masterful storyteller at the top of his form, Bartle Bull follows the successes of his popular Africa trilogy—A Café on the Nile, The White Rhino Hotel, and The Devil's Oasis—with a rousing historical adventure. Shanghai Station is a compelling tale of political terror and personal vengeance that unfolds in 1918 in China's colorful, turbulent port city of Shanghai. Well-born Alexander Karlov arrives in Shanghai with a mission, for the Bolsheviks have brutally killed his mother and abducted his twin sister. ...

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New York, NY 2003 Hard cover First edition. STATED 1ST PRINTING New in new dust jacket. BRIGHT SHINY, BRAND NEW Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 340 p. Contains: Illustrations. ... Audience: General/trade. Read more Show Less

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Overview

A masterful storyteller at the top of his form, Bartle Bull follows the successes of his popular Africa trilogy—A Café on the Nile, The White Rhino Hotel, and The Devil's Oasis—with a rousing historical adventure. Shanghai Station is a compelling tale of political terror and personal vengeance that unfolds in 1918 in China's colorful, turbulent port city of Shanghai. Well-born Alexander Karlov arrives in Shanghai with a mission, for the Bolsheviks have brutally killed his mother and abducted his twin sister. Vengeance commands Alexander's soul. It also entangles him in perilous alliances—with the Cossack hit man Ivan Semyonov; with Mei-lan, a woman who knows Shanghai's darkest secrets; with "Big Ear," leader of the city's most powerful Triad; with the French police; and with a spirited young American woman who calls herself Jesse James.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Shifting his setting from Cafe on the Nile's mid-1930s Africa, Bull is back with another bloody good atmospheric (and frankly erotic) historic swashbuckler, this time set in Shanghai at the end of WWI. Fleeing the Bolsheviks in September 1918, 17-year-old Alexander Karlov and his mother and twin sister abandon their vast Russian estate (where five generations of his family have bred and trained black chargers for the czars) and take the Trans-Siberian railway 4,000 miles east to the port of Vladivostok, intending to reunite with Count Karlov, Alexander's soldier/father. When the train is attacked by Bolsheviks and Alexander's leg is broken, he must look helplessly on as his mother is murdered and his sister kidnapped by ruthless commissar Viktor Polyak. Taking their prize horses, Alexander and his father escape Vladivostok on a freighter just ahead of the Bolsheviks, looking to make a new life in exotic Shanghai. There, Mao Zedong and Soviet agent Mikhail Borodin are urging the downtrodden Chinese peasants to revolution, and Jessica James, 18, the impressionable daughter of passive missionaries, has come under Mao's thrall. Alexander barely sets foot on shore when, in rapid-fire order, he succumbs to the charms of his rich cousin's wanton mistress, rescues Shanghai's most infamous madam and helps his father establish Salle d'Armes, a riding and fencing school-all this before he meets Jesse, becomes a racing jockey and gets revenge on Polyak. Typical of Bull's sweeping epics, this unflinchingly gory yarn evokes the sights, sounds, tastes and scents of a splendidly decadent era. (Feb.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Forbes Magazine
This historical adventure novel captures the sweep of human nature in a world that we'll never see again. Bartle Bull brilliantly brings to life post-WWI Shanghai. Bull's story centers on young Alexander Karlov, who is part of the émigré community that fled revolutionary Russia. Karlov and his aristocratic, ex-soldier father are consumed by a double agenda: making a living and taking ven-geance on the Bolsheviks, particularly on the commissar who murdered Alexander's mother, ab-ducted his twin sister and smashed Alexander's leg. (19 Apr 2004)
—Steve Forbes
Kirkus Reviews
Fleeing Russia and rampaging Bolsheviks, a count and his son set up shop as aristotrainers in 1918 Shanghai, a city with plenty of ethnopolitical problems of its own. Despite plenty of adjustments for today's sensibilities and political correctness (it really was a dashed hard life for the serfs, and those coolies with their night soil-well!), old-fashioned adventure novelist Bull (the Africa-set Devil's Oasis, 2001, etc.) can't hide his fondness for the tsarist upper-crust, their lawn parties, their lawn dresses, their oneness with horses, their flamboyant indebtedness, and their preservation of swashbuckling, which figures heavily throughout. Young swordsman Alexander Karlov, whose semiresolved adventures suggest the opening of a new series, is at the center of things here, failing to defend his dreamy reformist mum or his twin sister Katia against brutal Leninist aristocrat eliminator Viktor Polyak who has tracked down their eastbound train, strangled mum, and absconded with sis, stopping only to crush Alexander's leg in a door-squish maneuver before taking it on the lam. Nursed by faithful retainers and loyal White soldiers, the banged-up young Karlov limps into Shanghai with plenty of bad news for his nearly broke but still dashing father. The Karlovs are just the most recent arrivals in a flood of tsarist loyalists and revolutionary losers starting over again in the great international port. After shedding a solemn tear for the late countess, Count Karlov opens a line of credit, rents an unused opium warehouse, and sets up a riding and swordfighting shop. Young Alexander, when not helping with the new business, rescues and befriends a Chinese madam and strikes sparks with a prettyyoung Californian who is soft on the Soviets and about to get entangled with evil Viktor Polyak, now dragging his net along the Huangpo. Alexander must have vengeance. Not terribly tense, and there's more than a whiff of prewar Hollywood in the stagy dialogue. Maybe a sequel will pick up steam.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786713141
  • Publisher: Da Capo Press
  • Publication date: 2/15/2004
  • Pages: 394
  • Product dimensions: 6.22 (w) x 9.08 (h) x 1.32 (d)

Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 4 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2006

    Calling all Boy Scouts...

    Unlike Bull's Cafe on the Nile--which contained well sculptured characters and an engaging plot--this book is amateurish in comparison. The book is riddled with unbelievable coincidences, contrived characters, and deadly dull dialogue. Its only redeeming element is that it does portray post-WWI Shanghai and the cruelty of that society. However, the sexual exploits of young Alexander would most probably appeal only to the prurient interests of pubescent boys. All in all, rather disappointing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2006

    A spirited and compelling tale leaving a thirst for more.

    Mount your spirited Mongolian pony, unsheathe your sword, and be prepared to charge into another enthralling story by Bartle Bull in Shanghai Station. Once again Bull weaves an adventurous tale that takes one completely to another place and time. Tragic moments and characters with critical insight into themselves introduce and seduce you into following their lives with vivid concern. The detailed beauty and brutality of Shanghai early in the last century forms a story backdrop one is drawn to each time s/he cracks open the book. As with the compelling series begun with The White Rhino Hotel, the setting and characters have transported the reader to a place where there is a thirst for more storytelling. We now care about the young Count Karlov and Ms. Jesse James and are concerned about the possible survival of Commissar Polyak and the anticipated financial manipulations of Mr. Hak Lee. Readers will not merely expect Shanghai Station to be the beginning of another great series but demand it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2005

    Keeps your eyes open wide

    This book is fantastic. I read it for a book report, and I loved it. The plotline is excellent, and there are alot of details. Escaping from Russia leaving his life behind, Alexander Karlov finds himself in Shanghai! He and his father, Count Karlov establish the Salle D' Armes. I will leave the end for you to find out!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2005

    Great

    Very well put together, and surprisingly good. The beginning starts off a bit choppy, but gradually everything comes together and makes the book feel solid.

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