Shangri-La: The Return to the World of Lost Horizon

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In the remote unexplored highlands of Tibet there is a secret place called Shangri-La. Shadowed by mountain peaks and untouched by time, Shangri-La is a hidden utopia, open only to the most worthy of humankind. The curious and the bold all come searching for paradise, but only a few find it. Shangri-La is the chilling story of one such seeker. It is spring, 1966, and the atrocities of the Chinese Cultural Revolution have reached Tibet. General Zhang, of the invading People's Liberation Army, is a fortune hunter ...
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1996-05-01 Hardcover First Edition New First Edition, First printing (complete # line) for you collectors. Hardcover with dust jacket, no markings to dust jacket or book, no ... price clippings to dust jacket, and no remainder marks. Book ships to you wrapped in bubble-wrap and then boxed with FREE Delivery Confirmation. Read more Show Less

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Overview

In the remote unexplored highlands of Tibet there is a secret place called Shangri-La. Shadowed by mountain peaks and untouched by time, Shangri-La is a hidden utopia, open only to the most worthy of humankind. The curious and the bold all come searching for paradise, but only a few find it. Shangri-La is the chilling story of one such seeker. It is spring, 1966, and the atrocities of the Chinese Cultural Revolution have reached Tibet. General Zhang, of the invading People's Liberation Army, is a fortune hunter with plunder on his mind. Nothing is safe from him, especially Tibet's sacred treasures. His path of destruction and desecration leads him ever closer to the very heart of Tibet: Shangri-La. Only one person can stop General Zhang: Hugh Conway, guardian of Shangri-La. As Zhang slowly decodes the riddles that shroud this earthly paradise, Conway must find a way to halt the general's determined progress, even if it means leaving his protected valley and sacrificing himself. Conway's unlikely ally is Zhang's daughter, a young officer in the Chinese army, who must choose between loyalty and love.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Much has changed in Tibet since James Hilton used it 63 years ago as the inspiration for Lost Horizon, his classic novel about Shangri-la, a spiritual paradise hidden in the Himalayas. Where monks once walked, Chinese troops now march; where temples once stood, rubble lies. In an unfortunate triumph of polemic over art, this sequel to Hilton's yarn hammers home these sad facts and a multitude more, at the expense of good writing. The novel's very structure indicates Cooney and Altieri's (Deception, 1994) disregard of storytelling principles: it's told in a confusion of time frames, first in the present of the late 1960s, then as a flashforward, then back to the present, then as a further flashback, then in the present once again. Hugh Conway, the British diplomat who in Hilton's original became high lama of Shangri-la, must reenter the world in order to foil a Chinese general who, in the midst of plundering Tibet, gets wind of the fabled land whose inhabitants can live for centuries. During his descent, Conway falls in love with a young Chinese woman. Risking sudden aging, he lingers with her, telling her how, after leaving Shangri-la three decades earlier for the brief exile that concluded the Hilton tale, he made his tortuous way back to his beloved oasis in the snows. It's only in Conway's flashbacked story that the authors touch the magic and excitement of the original. Otherwise, this is a well-meaning but ham-fisted sequel to a novel that needed none. (May)
Library Journal
This sequel to James Hilton's famous novel (1933)-which was made into an even more famous film (1937)-answers a time-honored question: Did Hugh Conway find his way back to Shangri-La?
Roland Green
Arguments over the ethics of writing sequels to the works of deceased authors will continue until coffee break on the Day of Judgment, but this sequel to James Hilton's "Lost Horizon" is a solid work in its own right. Hugh Conway, who jumped ship while amnesiac at the end of the original book, recovered his memory and returned to Shangri-La, we learn, to become the High Lama. That was just as well, because in 1966 a Chinese General Zhang, with a pro-Tibetan daughter and a son fanatically involved in the Red Guard, seeks out Shangri-La for its rich supply of highly salable Tibetan art. Conway has to leave Shangri-La, risking normal aging (as moviegoers as well as Hilton's readers will recall), to confound the general's plans, but he also falls in love with the general's daughter. Cooney and Altieri tell this tale exceedingly well; so doing, they remain faithful to Hilton's concepts and even his style, prove themselves knowledgeable about China and Tibet, and provide a thoroughly good read.
Kirkus Reviews
Cooney and Altieri, coauthors of two novels of historical China, The Court of the Lion (1989) and Deception (1993), attempt a sequel to the long-ago Lost Horizon.

James Hilton's 1933 classic meant a great deal to a world struggling with worldwide depression and the rise of the Third Reich, because it portrayed a cultured, secret land without want, where everyone lived in harmony, no one grew old, and love might very well prove eternal. The reader was left with Hilton's Hugh Conway wandering the globe, trying to return to his paradise—a lovely metaphor, and one best untampered with, perhaps. In this follow-up, Conway did return and lived many happy and contemplative, if loveless, years. But as the 1960s arrive, Shangri-La is in peril: Chairman Mao's Cultural Revolution is overtaking Tibet, purging it of all things holy. In command is General Zhang, a villainous but clever man who begins following a sort of map to Shangri-La that's been laid down in ancient temples to guide the worthy pilgrim. Conway must enter the outside world again to throw Zhang off the trail, which he does by providing false clues that lead to a place of sorcery and delusion. Conway may stay only ten days in the outside world without aging, but in that time he falls in love with a young girl, Zhang's daughter, Ma Li. Ma Li recalls the entire story from the vantage point of a saner time, 2007, before she embarks on her own, late-life quest for Shangri-La and her lost lover.

A bit forced at times, and slow to meet Hilton's formidable challenge. But Zhang's unwitting evil quest rivals The Hobbit in its power and agony, and Conway's recollection of how he returned to Shangri-La is splendidly realized. As good as sequels get.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780688128722
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/28/1996
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 5.92 (w) x 8.57 (h) x 1.11 (d)

Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2013

    "Shangri-La: The Return to the World of Lost Horizon"

    "Shangri-La: The Return to the World of Lost Horizon" is an outstanding sequel to James Hilton's memorable novel as well as the classic 1937 film version. Cooney and Altieri have seamlessly integrated both Hilton's literary vision and Ronald Colman's cinematic portrayal of the protagonist, Conway, into a heroic, real-life figure who risks everything in order to preserve and protect Shangri-La from the powers of darkness and evil. The elements of love and romance amidst the historic backdrop make for a compelling adventure tale that leaves the reader filled with hope and inspiration while satisfactorily answering the question about what happened to Conway after his sojourn in "the valley of the Blue Moon."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2002

    Wait for a better sequel to Lost Horizon

    If you've never read the original Lost Horizon by James Hilton, don't pick this one up. The writers may be well experienced in the issues of Tibet and China, they fail to deliver the same impact Lost Horizon brought to us. It lacks huge components of description and character building and tries to drag the reader along a would-be interesting plot line. The original story is more poetic and inventive, whereas this story tries show you how evil one nation (China) has treated another innocent one (Tibet). Instead of a story it's a biased ethics lesson. Re-read Lost Horizon and enjoy true artistic beauty.

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