Shape Up!: Fun with Triangles and Other Polygons

Overview

Uses cheese slices, pretzel sticks, a slice of bread, graph paper, a pencil, and more to introduce various polygons, flat shapes with varying numbers of straight sides.

Uses cheese slices, pretzel sticks, a slice of bread, graph paper, a pencil, and more to introduce various polygons, flat shapes with varying numbers of straight sides.

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Overview

Uses cheese slices, pretzel sticks, a slice of bread, graph paper, a pencil, and more to introduce various polygons, flat shapes with varying numbers of straight sides.

Uses cheese slices, pretzel sticks, a slice of bread, graph paper, a pencil, and more to introduce various polygons, flat shapes with varying numbers of straight sides.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Judy Katsh
Subtitled "Fun with Triangles and other Polygons," this book introduces budding geometry students to flat, closed shapes known as polygons. In clear language, Adler defines and describes the shapes and their variations. He includes basic information as well as vocabulary and concepts not usually found in a form suitable for young children. He relates each shape to the other polygons and suggests a nice edible do-it-yourself illustration for each shape as well. The text is clear and involving. The illustrations are equally clear and involving; and knock-your-eyes out bold, too! There's a wisecracking cartoon kid who accompanies readers throughout and makes silliness and math seem to go together like pretzels and salt. It's a tremendous learning package that will be as pleasing to math teachers as it is to the kids who will probably discover this book on their own.
School Library Journal
Gr 2-5-Pretzels, cheese slices, and bread, as well as paper and pencil are used here to teach math concepts. Adler's simple, to-the-point explanations and Tobin's bright, colorful cartoon drawings work well together to bring basic geometry to primary-grade students. The different print sizes and bright colors create a bold visual effect. The book concludes with a one-page list that defines the shapes and angles examined. Although the use of food products to illustrate these concepts is common at the preschool and primary level, many adults have reservations about this practice. Nevertheless, this is a bouncy, hands-on introduction.-Eunice Weech, M. L. King Elementary School, Urbana, IL
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780823416387
  • Publisher: Holiday House, Inc.
  • Publication date: 9/28/2000
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 218,207
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 560L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 9.27 (w) x 9.50 (h) x 0.14 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 5, 2010

    Great with kids

    I used this book in a first grade classroom to help the students understand the concept of a polygon. The polygon activity in the book was a fun hands on activity for the students to do in the classroom which allowed them to not only undestand the attributes of different polygons but allowed them to play with food as well. The students enjoyed making the shapes and eating the bread throughout the activity.

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