Shapes That Roll
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Shapes That Roll

by Karen Nagel, Steve Wilson
     
 


Some shapes roll . . . some don't. Some shapes stack . . . others won't. Some shapes lie down . . .while others stand tall. Circles, squares, and triangles, even ovals and diamonds, are endlessly and intriguingly entertaining in Steve Wilson's world. Karen Nagel's rhythmic text is brought to life by Wilson's troupe of uniquely-shaped characters.  See more details below

Overview


Some shapes roll . . . some don't. Some shapes stack . . . others won't. Some shapes lie down . . .while others stand tall. Circles, squares, and triangles, even ovals and diamonds, are endlessly and intriguingly entertaining in Steve Wilson's world. Karen Nagel's rhythmic text is brought to life by Wilson's troupe of uniquely-shaped characters.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
04/27/2015
Nagel's (Two Crazy Pigs) verse celebrates a variety of shapes to the accompaniment of Wilson's (Lines that Wiggle) crisp, colorful spreads. A circle, a square, and a triangle—each with arms, legs, and pleasant smiles—introduce the properties of simple shapes. In an early spread, the school bus—yellow circle rolls a circle ("Shapes that roll"), the lime-green square pushes futilely against a larger square ("Shapes that can't"), and the candy-pink triangle waves cheerfully near another triangle ("Shapes with sides that angle and slant"). But rather than just delineating shapes' geometric attributes, Nagel's goal appears to be getting kids to see shapes everywhere ("The whole wide world is made of shapes") and helping them consider what they might connote in different applications—a triangle could be part of a seesaw, a pine tree, or the tip of an iceberg. A thick layer of spot varnish applied over the starring shapes on each page intensifies the already bright colors, giving each shape the glossy sheen of tiddlywinks. It's as close to a play set as a book can be without moving parts, and little eyes and little fingers will be charmed. Ages 4—8. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Marcie Flinchum Atkins
This unique shape book begins by teaching shapes, but after the first page, the fun with shapes begins. With a rollicking rhyme, Nagel shows preschool readers the things that shapes can do like "slant, stack and roll." Each page shows new things that can be made with shapes. Shapes like the crescent, stars, heart, and arrows are not named in the primary text, but shown how they are important shapes we see in everyday life. At the end shapes that are mentioned in the text are labeled and invites readers to revisit the text to find the shapes. Three-dimensional shapes are also included and compared to the plane shapes. The illustrations are brightly colored. Each shape is easy to recognize and is raised off the page slightly. The shapes are glossy, standing out from the text and give readers a tactile experience. This book would be a good addition to any preschool or kindergarten shape book collection. Reviewer: Marcie Flinchum Atkins
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Three friendly guides—Triangle, Circle, and Square—point out attributes of other common shapes. Wilson's hip page design incorporates matte black and white with high-gloss hues as the fun-loving trio discovers stars and rectangles as well as the silhouettes of fruit and sports equipment. Nagel's playful rhymes are both spontaneous and purposeful; they work seamlessly with the graphics, directing readers about the page. "Shapes that glimmer up above [crescent moon]/Shapes that make you think of love [pink heart]." The candy-coated delivery will excite and engage children. Final pages encourage readers to look back and identify the shapes they have seen in action. The vivid, contemporary design is sure to appeal to a wide audience.—Lisa Glasscock, Columbine Public Library, Littleton, CO
Kirkus Reviews
An orange circle, a pink triangle and a green square introduce children to many different shapes in a visually appealing overview of the topic. Loosely rhyming text initially describes the many things that different shapes can do-they can be thrown (balls), shine (stars), freeze (glaciers)-and then moves on to give attributes of shapes (spheres are round, circles are flat). Each shape is brightly colored and laminated; they almost look like stickers. While there is a great deal of information here, there is perhaps not enough focus: Many large, general ideas about shapes that may be new to children are presented briefly with little in-depth explanation. Still, the rhyme is catchy, Wilson's bright colors on white or black backgrounds are attention grabbing and children will enjoy studying the forms. The last few pages give the geometric names of the shapes within the book so that children can presumably go back and identify them. An eye-catching, very general introduction to the world of shapes. (Picture book. 4-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781934706817
Publisher:
Blue Apple Books
Publication date:
09/16/2009
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 9.90(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Karen Nagel is a longtime children's-book editor. She lives in New Jersey with her family.

When Steve Wilson was a little kid, he found real Bigfoot tracks and crop circles. It's true! Since then, he has been drawing weird things like UFOs, mythological monsters, aliens, ghosts, animals, cars, superheroes, and boats. He lives in Toronto.

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