Sharing the Seasons: A Book of Poems
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Sharing the Seasons: A Book of Poems

by Lee Bennett Hopkins, David Diaz
     
 

Combining a diverse selection of classic quotations and forty-eight poems, twelve for each of the four seasons, with the energetic and colorful paintings of a Caldecott Medal winning illustratror, this is the definitive collection of poems about the seasons for children and adults. Spring births a polliwog that becomes a "full frog"; in summer, wildflowers

Overview

Combining a diverse selection of classic quotations and forty-eight poems, twelve for each of the four seasons, with the energetic and colorful paintings of a Caldecott Medal winning illustratror, this is the definitive collection of poems about the seasons for children and adults. Spring births a polliwog that becomes a "full frog"; in summer, wildflowers choreograph an extravaganza; autumn's apples are found in generations of people's pockets; and winter's snowfall makes inanimate objects more beautiful than we could ever imagine. In addition to master poets Carl Sandburg, Richard Brautigan, Joseph Bruhac, and Karla Kuskin, twnety-nine of the poems have been especially commissioned by a host of contemporary poets such as Rebecca Kai Dotlich, Joan Bransfield Graham, J. Patrick Lewis, and Marilyn Singer.

The exciting, bold palette of Caldecott Medallist David Diaz brings the seasons to life and asks us to look at the seasons all over again, for the first time.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“These splendid poems give readers of all ages a meaningful and rich glimpse of the gifts (and nuisances) that each seasons brings.” –Through the Looking Glass Children's Book Review
Children's Literature - Mary Quattlebaum
"Fiddleheads unfurl/their green frills" writes Elizabeth Upton in "Spring Sun," one of the first poems in this vibrant year-long paean to the natural world. Fresh imagery and ear-pleasing sounds, ranging from Upton's alliteration, previously noted, to tooting, crooning "Wildflowers," grace the 48 poems (12 for each season) of this fine collection. Editor Lee Bennett Hopkins mixes work by contemporary poets for children (Marilyn Singer, April Halprin Wayland, Rebecca Kai Dotlich) with that of masters such as Carl Sandburg to lively effect, all lushly enhanced by the mixed-media illustrations of Caldecott Medalist David Diaz. Perfect for read-aloud or solitary pleasure. Reviewer: Mary Quattlebaum
School Library Journal
Gr 3–6—Hopkins presents 48 poems, 12 for each season. Some are by well-known writers like Lillian M. Fisher, Rebecca Kai Dotlich, and Joseph Bruchac (with several by Hopkins himself) while others are by less-familiar poets. Most are about changes in weather and landscape, outdoor play, and holidays. For example, Fran Haraway's "The Fourth of July Parade" brings forth images of "Spangled gowns,/Friendly clowns,/Smiling folks,/Papered spokes,/Marching feet,/Endless heat." Some of the more playful verses will lend themselves well to creative writing activities. For instance, April Halprin Wayland's "Budding Scholars" begins, "Welcome, Flowers./Write your name on a name tag./Find a seat./Raise your leaf if you've taken a class here before." Diaz's mixed-media illustrations are distinctive and highly stylized, with effective use of rhythm, pattern, and beautiful glowing colors. They are aesthetically lovely but are a bit lacking in child appeal. Overall, as in most anthologies, the quality of the writing varies a bit, but many of the poems are well written and enjoyable.—Lauralyn Persson, Wilmette Public Library, IL
Publishers Weekly
This dynamic collection features 48 poems—12 for each of the seasons—mingling previously published poems by Carl Sandburg, Karla Kuskin, and others, with new works by several poets, including Hopkins. The diverse, accessible selections create a mosaic that stirs the senses. Diaz’s ethereal silhouettes of animals and people, which resemble layered, cut-paper shadows, are ornately inlaid with nature motifs. Neon hues of spring and summer give way to autumnal colors, then to a softened winter palette, with selections like “Season,” by Lillian M. Fisher: “First snow/ falling./ Wild geese/ calling./ Fields are/ bare./ Winter/ whispers/ everywhere.” Ages 8–up. (Mar.)
Kirkus Reviews
Cheery, upbeat and accessible-and lovely to boot. Veteran poet and anthologist Hopkins makes good choices among contemporary poets young readers might recognize-Rebecca Kai Dotlich, Marilyn Singer, April Halprin Wayland, to name a few-and a few older names, such as Carl Sandburg and William Shakespeare. The brief (none longer than two pages and some only a few lines) poems are grouped by season, and each gets a page of Diaz's astonishing illustrations. They pulse with color, leaping off the page. His signature use of pattern echoes Mexican pottery or silhouette, always in mouthwatering incandescent colors that shade into one another. "Winter tames man, woman and beast" says Shakespeare; Anonymous writes of finding a shady spot in "August Heat": "And sit- / And sit- / And sit- / And sit!" Prince Redcloud makes a shaped autumn poem called "After," and Elizabeth Upton, in "Summer Sun," speaks in the sun's voice: "I linger in the evening / so they can / skip, hop, race / play ball / eat Popsicles . . . " Good all year round. (Poetry. 7-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781416902102
Publisher:
Margaret K. McElderry Books
Publication date:
03/09/2010
Pages:
83
Sales rank:
1,133,850
Product dimensions:
9.60(w) x 10.60(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
8 - 11 Years

Meet the Author

LEE BENNETT HOPKINS is a distinguished poet, writer, and anthologist whose poetry collections include the highly acclaimed Hand in Hand: An American History Through Poetry, illustrated by Peter Fiore, and My America: A Poetry Atlas of the United States, and America at War, both illustrated by Stephen Alcorn. Mr. Hopkins’s numerous awards include the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion for “lasting contributions to children’s literature” and both the Christopher Award and a Golden Kite Honor for his verse novel Been to Yesterdays: Poems of a Life. He lives in Cape Coral, Florida.

DAVID DIAZ has been an illustrator and graphic designer for more than twenty-five years. His children’s book illustrations have earned him many honors and awards, including the Caldecott Medal for Smoky Night by Eve Bunting. He also illustrated the Newbery Medal winner, The Wanderer by Sharon Creech, The Gospel Cinderella by Joyce Carol Oates, Angel Face by Sarah Weeks, and Little Scarecrow’s Boy by Margaret Wise Brown, which was named a New York Times Best Illustrated Book. His bold, stylized work has appeared in editorials for national publications such as The New York Times, Washington Post, Business Week, and The Atlantic Monthly. He lives in Carlsbad, California, and more of his work can be seen at diazicon.com.

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