Shark or Dolphin?

Shark or Dolphin?

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by Melissa Stewart
     
 

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How can you tell a shark from a dolphin? What is the difference? Find all the tips and hints you need to tell these two animals apart!

Trained as both a scientist and journalist, Melissa Stewart is the award-winning author of more than 100 books for young readers. While gathering information for her books, Melissa has explored tropical forests in Costa Rica, gone

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Overview

How can you tell a shark from a dolphin? What is the difference? Find all the tips and hints you need to tell these two animals apart!

Trained as both a scientist and journalist, Melissa Stewart is the award-winning author of more than 100 books for young readers. While gathering information for her books, Melissa has explored tropical forests in Costa Rica, gone on safari in Kenya and Tanzania, and swum with sea lions in the Galápagos Islands.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Judy Crowder
You're at your favorite beach and you see, far out in the waves, a fin sticking up through the water, then a pointy nose. Is it a shark or a dolphin? This book, part of the "Which Animal is Which?" series, helps young readers to know the difference between these seemingly similar ocean dwellers. Beginning with five important words to know—fish, oxygen, mammal, predator, prey—the book presents a page spread with a shark and a dolphin. The clear photo illustrations show two animals with a lot of similarities as well as differences. Which one is a fish? Fish (sharks), have gills, always live in water and are the same temperature as the water they swim in. Mammals (dolphins), on the other hand, have lungs and always remain the same temperature. And get a look at their tails: shark tails are vertical and help with rapid swimming while flukes, on a dolphin, are horizontal. Then there is skin vs. scales, hunting behavior—smell vs. sound—baby names (pup vs. calf) and so on. Beyond the obvious, the book does a great job of encouraging the reader to figure out how each animal's differences are also advantages to each particular ocean dweller. Finally there are the quirky facts: killer whales aren't really whales, but dolphins, and whale sharks—really sharks—can be as big as two school busses but eat tiny ocean critters. This is a good introduction to two of young readers' popular animals. The book includes a list of books, web sites and index. Reviewer: Judy Crowder
School Library Journal
Gr 2�3—Though not particularly helpful for quick identification—"Most butterflies fly during the day," while "Most moths fly at night," is a characteristic distinction—these dual profiles of common creatures should give budding naturalists an increased understanding of how scientists use appearance and behavior to classify sometimes-similar living things, along with introducing important terms like "cephalothorax" and "chrysalis." Spreads feature sharply detailed paired photographs of identified specimens seen from the same angle and at roughly equal size (i.e., not always to scale), with accompanying explanatory statements. The highlighted differences are then recapped on a single spread, and every book closes with a salient and potentially surprising new fact about each type of animal. Consider these books to lay groundwork for nature expeditions and for later studies of taxonomy.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781598452396
Publisher:
Enslow Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date:
07/01/2011
Series:
Which Animal Is Which?
Pages:
24
Sales rank:
1,121,917
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.25(d)
Lexile:
AD440L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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