Sharpe's Prey (Sharpe Series #5)

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Overview

The year is 1807 and Richard Sharpe's career in the British army seems to have come to a dead end. Following a victory in Sharpe's Trafalgar, he is loveless and destitute, relegated to the menial task of quartermaster.

He plans to leave the army, when the Honorable John Lavisser persuades him to join him on a secret mission to Copenhagen. Sharpe's mission—to deliver a bribe—is right up his alley, but when he arrives in Denmark he finds that his errand is much more serious. ...

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Sharpe's Prey (Sharpe Series #5)

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Overview

The year is 1807 and Richard Sharpe's career in the British army seems to have come to a dead end. Following a victory in Sharpe's Trafalgar, he is loveless and destitute, relegated to the menial task of quartermaster.

He plans to leave the army, when the Honorable John Lavisser persuades him to join him on a secret mission to Copenhagen. Sharpe's mission—to deliver a bribe—is right up his alley, but when he arrives in Denmark he finds that his errand is much more serious. French agaents are everywhere and in the thick of enemy spies and fierce battle action, Richard Sharpe must once again prove his courage and determination.

About the Author:
Bernard Cornwell is the author of the acclaimed and bestselling Richard Sharpe series; The Nathaniel Starbuck Chronicles, set during the American Civil War; Stonehenge 2000 B.C.: A Novel, and, most recently, The Archer's Tale. He lives with his wife in Cape Cod, MA.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The traditional military adventure yarn remains alive and well in the capable hands of Cornwell, as his up-from-the-ranks hero, Richard Sharpe, though stuck in the lowly role of regimental quartermaster, finds himself in the thick of the 1807 British campaign to destroy the Danish navy anchored in Copenhagen before the French can seize the ships and pose another invasion threat. As ever, the story starts fast, here with the murder of an English army officer in London by Captain John Lavisser a traitor working for the French and as vile a villain as any Sharpe has faced and scarcely lets up until Sharpe's final confrontation with Lavisser during the British bombardment of Copenhagen. Along with the swashbuckling action, Sharpe finds romance with the widowed daughter of Britain's top Danish agent, Astrid Skovgaard, who helps him get over the loss of Grace, the aristocratic young woman he met in his last outing, Sharpe's Trafalgar, but who died in childbirth. Much of the suspense hinges on whether Sharpe will quit the army and remain in Denmark, or persuade Astrid to return with him to England. Unlike Patrick O'Brian, Cornwell doesn't dwell on the details of early 19th-century life, writing in plain prose that neither evokes nor obviously violates period. This is the 18th installment in the Sharpe series (which now covers the years from 1799 to 1821, with a few small gaps). It's anyone's guess how many more are still to come, but Cornwell fans will welcome each and every one. (Jan. 1) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The redoubtably prolific Cornwell, who has rounded out his revisionist Arthurian Warlord trilogy, filed four volumes in his Starbuck Civil War series, and now has 18 novels in his Richard Sharpe British Army series, plus other incidental novels about Stonehenge, etc., takes his hero Sharpe on the Expedition to Copenhagen of 1807. Sharpe, in the hip-hop fashion of Cornwell's chronology, has already fought in the Waterloo Campaign in 1815 (Sharpe's Waterloo), sailed to the New World in 1821 (Sharpe's Devil) and most recently observed Nelson at Trafalgar (Sharpe's Trafalgar, 2001) in 1805. Now, God's teeth, how can it be, Sharpe not only is without woman but also without coin. Although he wants most to sell his battlefield commission for £450, he's told battlefield commissions can't be sold. Thus he must accept a post as quartermaster-and in addition is roped by the Honorable John Lavisser to carry a secret bribe to Denmark. But all is not well in Denmark, not with the French lusting to take over the Danish fleet. There is something splendid about Sharpe's rugged leadership of British troops against the massed musketry of the Danes but not in the crippled children and widespread death of Danish civilians as the British bombard Copenhagen and set it afire. Rousing. At last count, 12 Sharpe novels had been filmed by PBS.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402518645
  • Publisher: Recorded Books, LLC
  • Publication date: 1/1/2002
  • Series: Sharpe Series , #5
  • Format: Cassette
  • Edition description: Unabridged

Meet the Author

Bernard Cornwell is the author of the acclaimed New York Times bestsellers 1356 and Agincourt; the bestselling Saxon Tales, which include The Last Kingdom, The Pale Horseman, Lords of the North, Sword Song, The Burning Land, and most recently Death of Kings; and the Richard Sharpe novels, among many others. He lives with his wife on Cape Cod and in Charleston, South Carolina.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Captain Henry Willsen of His Majesty's Dirty Half Hundred, more formally the 50th Regiment of West Kent, parried his opponent's saber. He did it hurriedly. His right hand was low so that his saber's blade was raised in the position known to the fencing masters as the quarte basse and the knowledgeable spectators thought the parry was feeble. A surprised murmur sounded, for Willsen was good. Very good. He had been attacking, but it was apparent he had been slow to see his taller opponent's counter and now he was in disorganized retreat. The taller man pressed, swatting the quarte basse aside and lunging so that Willsen skittered backward, his slippers squeaking with a staccato judder on the wooden floor which was liberally scattered with French chalk. The very sound of the slippers on the chalked wood denoted panic. The sabers clashed harshly again, the taller man stamped forward, his blade flickering, clanging, reaching, and Willsen was countering in apparent desperation until, so fast that those watching could scarce follow his blade's quick movement, he stepped to one side and riposted at his opponent's cheek. There seemed little power in the riposte, for its force all came from Willsen's wrist rather than from his full arm, but the saber's edge still struck the taller man with such might that he lost his balance. He swayed, right arm flailing, and Willsen gently touched his weapon's point to his opponent's chest so that he toppled to the floor.

"Enough!" the Master-at-Arms called.

"God's teeth." The fallen man swept his blade at Willsen's ankles in a fit of pique. The blow was easily blocked and Willsen just walkedaway.

I said enough, my lord!" the Master-at-Arms shouted angrily.

"How the devil did you do that, Willsen?" Lord Marsden pulled off the padded leather helmet with its wire visor that had protected his face. I had you on your damned ass!"

Willsen, who had planned the whole passage of the fight from the moment he made a deliberately soft quarte basse, bowed. "Perhaps I was just fortunate, my lord?"

"Don't patronize me, man," Lord Marsden snapped as he climbed to his feet. "What was it?"

"Your disengagement from the sixte was slow, my lord."

"The devil it was," Lord Marsden growled. fie was proud of his ability with foil or saber, yet he knew Willsen had bested him easily by feigning a squeaking retreat. His lordship scowled, then realized he was being ungracious and so, tucking the saber under his arm, held out a hand. "You're quick, Willsen, damned quick."

The handful of spectators applauded the show of sportsmanship. They were in Horace Jackson's Hall of Arms, an establishment on London's Jermyn Street where wealthy men could learn the arts of pugilism, fencing and pistol shooting. The hall was a high bare room lined with racks of swords and sabers, smelling of tobacco and liniment, and decorated with prints of prize fighters, mastiffs and racehorses. The only women in the. place served drinks and food, or else worked in the small rooms above the hall where the beds were soft and the prices high.

Willsen pulled off his helmet and ran a hand through his long fair hair. He bowed to his beaten opponent, then carried both sabers to the weapon rack at the side of the hall where a tall, very thin and extraordinarily handsome captain in the red coat and blue facings of the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards was waiting. The guardsman, a stranger to Willsen, tossed away a half-smoked cigar as Willsen approached, "You fooled him," the Captain said cheerfully.

Willsen frowned at the stranger's impertinence, but he answered politely enough. Willsen, after all, was an employee in Horace Jackson's Hall and the Guards Captain, judging by the elegant cut of his expensive uniform, was a patron. The sort of patron, moreover, who could not wait to prove himself against the celebrated Henry Willsen. "I fooled him?" Willsen asked. "How?"

"The quarte basse," the guardsman said, "you made it soft, am I right?"

Willsen was impressed at the guardsman's acuity, but did not betray it. "Perhaps I was just fortunate?" he suggested. He was being modest, for he had the reputation of being the finest swordsman in the Dirty Half Hundred, probably in the whole army and maybe in the entire country, but he belittled his ability, just as he shrugged off those who reckoned he was the best pistol shot in Kent. A soldier, Willsen liked to say, should be a master of his arms and so he practiced assiduously and prayed that one day his skill would be useful in the service of his country. Until that time came he earned his captain's pay and, because that was not sufficient to support a wife, child and mess bill, he taught fencing and pistol-shooting in Horace Jackson's Hall of Arms. Jackson, an old pugilist with a mashed face, wanted Willsen to leave the army and join the establishment fulltime, but Willsen liked being a soldier. It gave him a position in British society. It might not be a high place, but it was honorable.

"There's no such thing as luck," the guardsman said, only now he spoke in Danish, "not when you're fighting."

Willsen had been turning away, but the change of language made him look back to the golden-haired Guards Captain. His first careless impression had been one of privileged youth, but he now saw that the guardsman was probably in his early thirties and had a cynical, knowing cast to his devil-may-care good looks. This was a man, Willsen thought, who would be at home in a palace or at a prizefight. A formidable man too, and one who was of peculiar importance to Willsen, who now offered the guardsman a half-bow. "You, sir," he said respectfully, "must be Major the Honorable John Lavisser...

Sharpe's Prey. Copyright © by Bernard Cornwell. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 35 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 35 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2002

    The Rifleman as a Spy

    When Bernard Cornwell wrote Sharpe¿s Rifles over two decades ago, it is obvious he did not intend to add novels before the peninsular campaign. Now there are four, with the most recent being Sharp¿s Prey, a story of the British 1807 bombardment of Copenhagen with Richard Sharp serving as a spy. The story starts off slowly, with an explanation of Sharpe¿s experiences between Sharpe¿s Trafalgar and the current novel, his financial difficulties, the horror of London in 1807, and the introduction of the prey. It is not until we get half way into the book that the traditional Sharp appears, the battleground Sharp, although for the most part the spy Sharp. There is even a love interest. Some of the supporting cast comes from Sharpe¿s Trafalgar, but most are unique to this effort¿and they are well drawn and interesting. Unfortunately, they must disappear, as the remaining history between Sharp¿s Prey and Sharpe¿s Rifles is Wellington in Portugal, most likely Cornwell¿s next Sharpe story. As always, Cornwell is a superb wordsmith. His descriptions of Copenhagen are real, and, from time to time, there are sentences that summarize a character¿that say all there is to say about the character in shorthand. My only complaint is Sharpe¿s nemesis is not as evil as others are in the series¿I can almost like and understand this one.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 1, 2012

    Highly recommend.

    You feel the battle going on around you.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2008

    superior sharpe

    A nice change of pace for our loveable rogue. We get to see him righting some wrongs from his past in old blighty. Then we see him facing a foe that he is in a moral quandry about fighting. He is more spy than soldier and faces off against a very worthy female adversary. A very nice history lesson about a subject that I had never heard of. All in all, a superior entry into the sharpe chronicles!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 8, 2004

    Clap

    Clap. Because Bernard Cornwell has made another addition to the esteemed Sharpe series that is sure to gain approval from the audience. Sharpe has returned to England and is in mourning over the death of Grace but is jerked out of it when General Baird (from Seringapatam) comes and requests his assistance in the guarding of a substantial bribe being sent to the Prince of Denmark in exchange for his navy which is pursued by France. Sharpe is charged with the protection of a Captain Lavisser who is escorting the money (43,000 guineas) to Denmark. When he learns that Lavisser is a traitor who wishes to take the money for himself Sharpe barely escapes with his life and finds himself ensnared in a deadly game of cat and mouse that leads him throughout the espionage and siege of Denmark and into the company of his comrades from Trafalgar. A great and entertaining read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 7, 2002

    THE BEST YET

    This was the gest book i've read yet by Bernard Cornwell and i've read all his books except stone henge. This was the best of the sharpes series i believe yet though i liked his starbuck series better. I really recommend this book

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