She Loved Baseball: The Effa Manley Story [NOOK Book]

Overview

Effa always loved baseball. As a young woman, she would go to Yankee Stadium just to see Babe Ruth's mighty swing. But she never dreamed she would someday own a baseball team. Or be the first-and only-woman ever inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
From her childhood in Philadelphia to her groundbreaking role as business manager and owner of the Newark Eagles, Effa Manley always fought for what was right. And she always swung for the ...
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Overview

Effa always loved baseball. As a young woman, she would go to Yankee Stadium just to see Babe Ruth's mighty swing. But she never dreamed she would someday own a baseball team. Or be the first-and only-woman ever inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
From her childhood in Philadelphia to her groundbreaking role as business manager and owner of the Newark Eagles, Effa Manley always fought for what was right. And she always swung for the fences.
From author Audrey Vernick and illustrator Don Tate comes the remarkable story of an all-star of a woman.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Effa Manley became aware of racial prejudice at a young age, when she was criticized by a school principal for playing with "those Negroes," who were in fact her darker-skinned siblings. Moving to New York City as an adult, she organized the "Citizen's League for Fair Play," demanding businesses hire black employees. With her husband, she started the Brooklyn Eagles, part of the Negro National League, "handling almost all the team's business," and later working to insure that the players were never forgotten. Tate's energetic illustrations harmonize well with Vernick's fresh and engaging text. History favors the individuals in the spotlight: here's an entertaining portrait of a woman who made significant strides behind the scenes. Ages 5–10. (Nov.)
Booklist
“Vernick adds appeal to this straightforward biography with repetitive phrases that emphasize Manley’s activist spirit, while Tate’s slightly stylized acrylic paintings convey both the historical setting and the timeless excitement in the ballpark.”
Children's Literature - Sylvia Firth
Effa Manley deserves her plaque in the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Her remarkable life is presented here in clear, interesting prose that is accompanied by colorful paintings that genuinely depict the people and places of the early to late twentieth century. After graduating from high school in Philadelphia, Manley moved to New York City. Here she began to develop a love for baseball at Yankee Stadium as she watched Babe Ruth play. During the 1932 World Series, Effa met another baseball fan, Abe Manley. Soon they were in love and were married in 1935. That same year Abe aided in setting up the Negro National League. Together they established the Brooklyn Eagles to compete in the league, with Manley serving as the team's business manager. Over the years, the other team owners came to respect Manley for her knowledge of the game and her excellence as a manager. One highlight for her was winning the Negro League Championship in 1946. Difficulties over contract payments to the teams when the Negro players began to break into the big leagues led Manley to speak to the press. Soon compensation was paid to the teams, but as more and more players left, the Negro League eventually folded. A social activist, Manley worked in the civil rights movement and wrote numerous letters to the National Baseball Hall of Fame resulting in the induction of African American players. In 2006 Effa Manley became the first woman to be elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Add this wonderful book to the collection for use by baseball fans, black history classes and biography assignments. Reviewer: Sylvia Firth
School Library Journal
Gr 2–4—Vernick's sprightly text and Tate's vibrant illustrations combine in an appreciative tribute to the first woman to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Manley blazed a trail on two fronts: she fought racial injustice throughout her life; and as coowner of the Newark Eagles, a Negro League team, she succeeded in a male-dominated field. Growing up in the early 1900s, the biracial Manley often ran into discrimination and heard, "That's just the way things are." However, she organized boycotts and stood up for her rights and the rights of her players. Even after black ballplayers gained admission to the major leagues, Manley advocated on their behalf until the Hall of Fame began to induct and recognize "her players." This appreciative biography gently limns the spirited individual behind these accomplishments. At the ballpark, Manley chose to sit in the stands "where the seats vibrated from foot-stomping excitement," and when the score was close, she peeked between her white-gloved fingers. Both author and illustrator are on top of their games as they bring this inspiring story to life.—Marilyn Taniguchi, Beverly Hills Public Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews

"That's just the way things are," was a philosophy Effa Manley could not accept, even though, as a light-skinned black, she could have taken advantage of it. Whenever she encountered injustice, she fought tirelessly to find a solution. She and her husband founded the Eagles baseball team in the Negro Leagues, and she became a solid, innovative businesswoman who nurtured the players on and off the field. When many Negro League players finally got an opportunity to join the Major Leagues, she fought to negotiate fair terms for the transference of the players' contracts. Later in life, she campaigned for the inclusion of Negro League players in the Baseball Hall of Fame. Vernick employs a matter-of-fact tone and highly descriptive, accessible language that not only provides a great deal of information but also captures both the essence of the era and Manley's compassion and strength of character. Tate's muscular illustrations illuminate and breathe life into the events. He skillfully emphasizes emotions, giving every character a distinct personality and demeanor. Effa became the first woman inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame; readers will cheer. (Picture book/biography. 6-10)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062184801
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 11/15/2011
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: NOOK Kids
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 1,280,761
  • Age range: 5 - 10 Years
  • File size: 20 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Audrey Vernick

Audrey Vernick is the author of several books for children, including Is Your Buffalo Ready For Kindergarten? and She Loved Baseball. The Effa Manley Story as well as Bark Tim: A True Story of Friendship, cowritten with her sister Ellen Glassman Gidaro. Audrey lives with her family in Ocean, New Jersey.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2013

    An excellent children's book about Effa Manley, the only woman e

    An excellent children's book about Effa Manley, the only woman ever to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 25, 2012

    It's a kids book

    It was not what I was looking for, but it wasn't a bad book - it is a children's book.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

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