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She Still Calls Me Daddy: Building a New Relationship with Your Daughter After You Walk Her Down the Aisle [NOOK Book]

Overview

A memorable guidebook for fathers to help them create a new adventure with their married daughters.


Standing at the altar giving their little girl away begins a new day and the need for a new way for fathers to relate to their daughters....

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She Still Calls Me Daddy: Building a New Relationship with Your Daughter After You Walk Her Down the Aisle

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Overview

A memorable guidebook for fathers to help them create a new adventure with their married daughters.


Standing at the altar giving their little girl away begins a new day and the need for a new way for fathers to relate to their daughters. Robert Wolgemuth, author of the best-selling She Calls Me Daddy, reminds fathers of the important role they still play while offering insight as to how it must change in the next chapter of their girls' lives. Topics cover seven relational issues:



  • Protection

  • Conversation

  • Affection

  • Discipline

  • Laughter

  • Faith

  • Conduct


Includes thoughts on an ongoing relationship as well as on becoming a granddaddy. Discussion questions provide a great opportunity for personal or group study.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781418577711
  • Publisher: Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
  • Publication date: 5/5/2009
  • Sold by: THOMAS NELSON
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 224
  • File size: 673 KB

Meet the Author

Dr. Robert Wolgemuth is a popular Bible teacher, speaker, and best-selling author. His nineteenbooks include She Calls Me Daddy, The Most Important Year, and the notes to Dad's Bible. Married to Bobbie for almost forty years, they have two grown daughters, two sons-in-law, and five grandchildren.
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Table of Contents

With Gratitude ix

Introduction: Welcome to the Rest of Your Life xiii

1 Saying Good-bye 1

2 New Normals for Everyone 19

3 Protection: Safeguarding Her Marriage 41

4 Conversation: Can You Hear Me Now? 61

5 Affection: Widening Your Embrace 79

6 Discipline: The Hard Work of Letting Go 101

7 Laughter: A Preacher, a Rabbi, and a Priest Went Fishing ... 117

8 Faith: Where the Real Power Lives 137

9 Conduct: It's Showtime for Dad 157

10 Her Mother and I Still Do 175

Conclusion: For Dads in Special Situations 189

Notes 199

About the Author 201

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 14, 2009

    Awesome Books for Parents

    She Still Calls Me Daddy by Robert Wolgemuth

    Robert writes about being a father and a parent to your child, specifically your daughter after she is a married woman. He goes through the different aspects of that relationship, from giving advice to her to how as her parent's, the father and mother should be setting a godly example for her and her husband.
    I LOVE THIS BOOK!!! I know this was written from a father's perspective to his daughter(s). I know this was written for fathers to read. But as a daughter who is married and has children of my own, it was a very informative and enlightening and inspirational book. Robert Wolgemuth brought in a very strong Biblical basis, while incorporating his own life experiences. I would definitely recommend this book to all parents out there with older children, little children, grandchildren. I would love to read his first book, "She Calls Me Daddy."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 10, 2009

    A Good Read for All Family Members

    She Still Calls Me Daddy by Robert Wolgemuth. She Still Calls Me Daddy is a follow up to Wolgemuth's first book She Calls Me Daddy in which he explores a father's roll in rearing his daughter. A self-proclaimed handyman, Wolgemuth uses the illustration of remodeling a home as to what goes on with the father/daughter relationship after the daughter's walk down the aisle.

    I found the book to be surprisingly funny (you can never know with a guys sense of humor) and enlightening. Being married 2 years now myself, I know that relationships change (along with boundaries) but in the end everyone is still the person you grew up loving. Wolgemuth identifies key areas in the relationship such as conversation, encouragement and laughter, to name a few, that undergo this remodeling process.

    I would definitely recommend this book to any Dad (this is the intended audience), daughter, or family member who is about to and/or has a daughter married. It isn't easy transition to make but as Wolgemuth says...."Is it a boy, girl? It's a Couple!"

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2009

    She Still Calls Me Daddy by Robert Wolgemuth

    I have always wanted to have a daughter, they are the "Apple" of their Daddy's eyes, and I can't wait until God blesses me with the chance to raise my own.

    I just finished reading my next book to be reviewed from Thomas Nelson Publishing. I chose Robert Wolgemuth's book She Still Calls Me Daddy by Robert Wolgemuth because the list of books from which I could choose was short: I had read many of the choices available.

    I'm always grateful for the opportunity to receive free books, but I wasn't expecting much from this one. Primarily because I don't have a daughter getting married. But I am, in a way, a counselor; so figured it would have something to offer.

    It did.

    This is a gem of a book. The author really lets you peer into his life and what it's been like for him to gain a son-in-law, while loosening his grip on a daughter. Wolgemuth is quick to share many of the ways he blew it.

    Lots of engaging anecdotes fill this book. Stories of how mom had to learn to love something else. She had to let go of her daughters and develop new hobbies and activities. Stories of dad and how he embarrassed his daughter by taking charge of the wedding rehearsal, or tried to take control of where a picture hung in his daughter's new home.

    The book is a guide of sorts for the process of launching our children into a world that includes spouses. Through story, Wolgemuth engages the reader as he shows how he made his way into new territory - being the dad of a grown, married woman who has made someone else her priority.

    I'm glad I chose this book. It was a fun easy read and I feel a little better prepared for the day I walk my daughter down the aisle.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 17, 2009

    An interesting and enlightening read from the daughter's point-of-view

    Being a single girl, thus a daughter, and with no prospects of being married any time soon, I am hardly the audience to whom this book was intended. Yet advice for a father whose daughter is about to walk down the aisle, or has already walked down the aisle, was intriguing.

    Dr. Wolgemuth wrote She Still Calls Me Daddy as a follow-up to his previous bestseller She Calls Me Daddy as a guide for fathers whose relationship is inevitably changing with their beloved daughters. He wants to remind them that she no longer belongs to him, but now belongs to another man. He has raised and given away two daughters in marriage, and wants to share his knowledge.

    Wolgemuth relates the relationship between father and daughter to that of remodeling a house. Therefore, each chapter has a remodeler's checklist. It's a checklist of steps to take in letting your daughter go, how to navigate the changes occurring in the relationship, and how to accept your new son. And of course, the role of faith in your life.

    It's interesting to read from a daughter's point-of-view, and a book that I hope to one day share with my own father.

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  • Posted July 16, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Fantastic Read for Parents of the Bride!

    In She Still Calls Me Daddy, Robert Wolgemuth, gives practical advice on releasing your daughter to her husband while "rebuilding" your relationship with her. Wolgemuth shares practical rebuilding steps in seven areas of relationship:
    *Protection
    *Conversation
    *Affection
    *Discipline
    *Laughter
    *Faith
    *Conduct
    Wolgemuth's candid approach and great story telling effectively teach the lessons both mother and father need to learn in order to build a lasting relationship with their daughter and her husband as they embark on their new marriage adventure.

    As a pastor's wife and mother of four daughters and four sons, I see the enormous value in a book that helps parents through the difficult adjustment of giving your child away to be cared for by another. I will recommend this book to my husband as a resource in counseling as well as to my friends with children nearing marrying age. I appreciated Wolgemuth's ability to laugh at his own errors and use them as tools to teach and equip other parents going through the same adventure.

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  • Posted July 15, 2009

    Very Insightful Book...and I'm not even a Dad!!

    I thought this was a very insightful book, and I'm not even a Dad. I thought the author did a great job of dealing with a few different touchy areas of life when it comes to how a Father will handle his relationship with his daughter once she becomes a wife. Even though she will be married and the support she'll need will mostly be found through her husband, she is still her Daddy's daughter. Author Robert Wolgemuth suggests that using seven different steps, which consist of protection, conversation, affection, discipline, laughter, faith, and conduct do deal with this new woman. Even though I'm not a Father, I found it insightful to understand what would be going on in the mind of one when it comes to his Daughter. It's great because it gives the reader logical steps to follow and the author hits on the things that daughters want to tell their Father but don't know how, like how they still love their Dad, but at the same time, they are no longer a little girl, and they want his support in a different way, because when they do this, they are showing their daughter that he trust them and believes in what they're doing.

    Overall, great book. I would highly recommend it to anyone who wants to gain a deeper understanding of the Father/Daughter relationship.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 14, 2009

    Entertaining and useful

    She Still Calls Me Daddy - a book review
    Jul 14th, 2009 by Lucille Edit |


    I just finished reading my next book to be reviewed from Thomas Nelson Publishing. I chose Robert Wolgemuth's book She Still Calls Me Daddy because the list of books from which I could choose was short: I had already read and reviewed many of the choices available.

    I'm always grateful for the opportunity to receive free books, but I wasn't expecting much from this one. Primarily because I don't have a daughter getting married, and because I'm not a dad. But I am a counselor; so figured it would have something to offer.

    It did.

    This is a gem of a book. The author really lets you peer into his life and what it's been like for him to gain a son-in-law, while loosening his grip on a daughter. Wolgemuth is quick to share many of the ways he blew it.

    Lots of engaging anecdotes fill this book. Stories of how mom had to learn to love something else. She had to let go of her daughters and develop new hobbies and activities. Stories of dad and how he embarrassed his daughter by taking charge of the wedding rehearsal, or tried to take control of where a picture hung in his daughter's new home.

    The book is a guide of sorts for the process of launching our children into a world that includes spouses. Through story, Wolgemuth engages the reader as he shows how he made his way into new territory - being the dad of a grown, married woman who has made someone else her priority.

    I'm glad I chose this book. It was a fun easy read and I feel a little better prepared for the day my children marry.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    She Still Calls Me Daddy, by Robert Wolgemuth

    I requested this book from Thomas Nelson as part of the Book Review Bloggers program. I didn't expect "She Still Calls Me Daddy" would be very relevant to the family structure to which I'm now accustomed (basically, neither parent in the picture), but I thought I would give it a try.

    This book is about how fathers can develop a new but meaningful relationship with their married daughters - basically, how things change after your little girl's wedding. The author discusses topics such as how best to relate to one's son-in-law, where a daughter's priorities and loyalties should lie after marriage and what parents can do for their daughters (e.g. praying for her - good; buying furniture for her new house - not so good).

    In other words, this book is 200 pages of (mostly) common sense and Biblical examples. It might be helpful if people are genuinely unaware that it's not a good idea to go to one's parents with marital problems, or if fathers believe that their adult children should share their views on drinking.

    On the whole, though, the relationships it describes are so conservative that I can't see this book working for anyone who is not a devout Christian. For instance, in the author's family, children are encouraged to pray for their future spouses, and I couldn't really relate to this. Also, a woman takes her husband's last name after they marry, and since this amounts to discarding her daddy's, it's described as "throwing away her identity".

    And while it's pleasant to read of families being affectionate with each other, the author's relationship with his children seemed a little. enmeshed. For instance, he mentions that he and his daughters call or text each other every day, though one of his son-in-laws waited until after the wedding to tell his wife that he wasn't comfortable with her kissing her father on the lips. Maybe it's just that I grew up in a more reserved Asian family, though.

    In conclusion, this book was generally inoffensive and sometimes sensible, but I wouldn't recommend it to anyone unless I was certain that their family was similar to the author's.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 27, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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