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She Works/He Works / Edition 1

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Overview


Readable and challenging, this four-year study of three hundred middle-class and working-class couples debunks the myth of the overwrought working mother with her insensitive husband and neglected children. Drawing on extensive cross-disciplinary research, Rosalind Barnett and Caryl Rivers argue that "collaborative couples," busy as they are, thrive in their diverse roles, and inspire competence and confidence in their children.
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Editorial Reviews

New York Review of Books

Rivers and Barnett's four-year study gives an upbeat picture of the advantages for families of women working. Despite the more complicated logistics, they find that mothers with careers are happier, with more cheerful and competent children, and fathers more engaged in family life.
— Diane Johnson

Boston Globe

A wonderful antidote to all the books peddling guilt to the two-worker family. It's good common sense for the 1990's—bound to make you feel better.
— Ellen Goodman

Journal of Economic Literature
[She Works/He Works] identifies the stressful as well as the rewarding aspects of the lives of full-time-employed two-earner couples, based on a study conducted in two communities in the greater Boston area. [It] contends that members of the new two-working-parent American family are thriving--often living happier, healthier, and more well-rounded lives than members of the family of the 1950s.
Contemporary Psychology

Armed with data from their own research, the Adult Lives Project, a well-sampled, longitudinal study of 300 dual-earner couples in two communities in Massachusetts...and many other significant studies, Barnett and Rivers dispel many popularized assumptions about the difficulties faced by employed wives and mothers. For example, a wide-spread assumption exists that employment is bad for women's physical health and mental heath...Barnett and Rivers point out that, in fact...employed women are not showing increasing heart symptoms,...have lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol levels...[and, among married women] show better mental health than those who are not employed. This book [is] persuasive, as well as a delightful read. I want to buy a dozen copies to share with [my colleagues] who have worried with me about whether they will be able to have both a career and a family life. If Barnett and Rivers are right, they will.
— Janet Shibley Hyde

New York Review of Books - Diane Johnson
Rivers and Barnett's four-year study gives an upbeat picture of the advantages for families of women working. Despite the more complicated logistics, they find that mothers with careers are happier, with more cheerful and competent children, and fathers more engaged in family life.
Boston Globe - Ellen Goodman
A wonderful antidote to all the books peddling guilt to the two-worker family. It's good common sense for the 1990's--bound to make you feel better.
Contemporary Psychology - Janet Shibley Hyde
Armed with data from their own research, the Adult Lives Project, a well-sampled, longitudinal study of 300 dual-earner couples in two communities in Massachusetts...and many other significant studies, Barnett and Rivers dispel many popularized assumptions about the difficulties faced by employed wives and mothers. For example, a wide-spread assumption exists that employment is bad for women's physical health and mental heath...Barnett and Rivers point out that, in fact...employed women are not showing increasing heart symptoms,...have lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol levels...[and, among married women] show better mental health than those who are not employed. This book [is] persuasive, as well as a delightful read. I want to buy a dozen copies to share with [my colleagues] who have worried with me about whether they will be able to have both a career and a family life. If Barnett and Rivers are right, they will.
Boston Globe
A wonderful antidote to all the books peddling guilt to the two-worker family. It's good common sense for the 1990's--bound to make you feel better.
— Ellen Goodman
New York Review of Books
Rivers and Barnett's four-year study gives an upbeat picture of the advantages for families of women working. Despite the more complicated logistics, they find that mothers with careers are happier, with more cheerful and competent children, and fathers more engaged in family life.
— Diane Johnson
Contemporary Psychology
Armed with data from their own research, the Adult Lives Project, a well-sampled, longitudinal study of 300 dual-earner couples in two communities in Massachusetts...and many other significant studies, Barnett and Rivers dispel many popularized assumptions about the difficulties faced by employed wives and mothers. For example, a wide-spread assumption exists that employment is bad for women's physical health and mental heath...Barnett and Rivers point out that, in fact...employed women are not showing increasing heart symptoms,...have lower blood pressure and lower cholesterol levels...[and, among married women] show better mental health than those who are not employed. This book [is] persuasive, as well as a delightful read. I want to buy a dozen copies to share with [my colleagues] who have worried with me about whether they will be able to have both a career and a family life. If Barnett and Rivers are right, they will.
— Janet Shibley Hyde
Diane johnson
Rivers' and Barnett's four-year study gives an upbeat picture of the advantages for families of women working. Despite the more complicated logistics, they find that mothers with careers are happier, with more cheerful and competent children, and fathers more engaged in family life. -- New York Review of Books
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674805958
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 1/1/1998
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 276
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.62 (d)

Meet the Author

Rosalind C. Barnett is Senior Scholar in Residence at the Murray Research Center at Radcliffe College.

Caryl Rivers is Professor of Journalism at Boston University.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments

Preface

1. Ozzie and Harriet Are Dead

2. The New Nostalgia

3. The Myth of the Miserable Working Woman

4. The Collaborative Couple

5. Twenty-First-Century Man

6. The New Fatherhood

7. Working It Out: Sally and Fred

8. Working Moms Are Good Moms

9. The New Motherhood

10. Working It Out: Steve and Connie

11. Changing the Corporate Culture

12. Attention Working Women

13. Working It Out: Ellen and Marvin

14. The Second Shift: Who's Really On It?

15. Making Marriage Work

16. Working It Out: Tom and Jen

17. Side By Side

18. The Road Ahead

Notes

Index

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