Sheetzucacapoopoo 2: Max Goes to the Dogs

Sheetzucacapoopoo 2: Max Goes to the Dogs

by Joy Behar, Gene Barretta, Dave Silaber
     
 

In daytime-TV dynamo Joy Behar's follow-up to her New York Times bestseller Sheetzucacapoopoo: My Kind of Dog, Max is off to doggy day care. And while the lovable Shih tzu/cocker spaniel/poodle puppy is initially reluctant to leave the comfort of home for the rigors of obedience school, Max finds that school can be fun . . . especially when all

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Overview

In daytime-TV dynamo Joy Behar's follow-up to her New York Times bestseller Sheetzucacapoopoo: My Kind of Dog, Max is off to doggy day care. And while the lovable Shih tzu/cocker spaniel/poodle puppy is initially reluctant to leave the comfort of home for the rigors of obedience school, Max finds that school can be fun . . . especially when all dogs-big and small-learn to get along!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Norah Piehl
Comedienne and talk show host Joy Behar has written a second story about Max, a "part Shih Tzu, part cocker spaniel, and part poodle—a Sheetzucacapoopoo." In his latest adventure, Max, who has gotten in trouble at home once too often, heads to Doggy Day Care while his owner Evie is at school. At first, the spunky little dog is ignored or bullied by the other dogs and has a miserable time. He is particularly terrorized by a menacing big dog named Brutus. Before too long, though, the enterprising Max organizes the smaller dogs so that they can compete with the bigger dogs for food, toys, and the best napping spots. Max even defuses the resulting big dog/little dog tension and makes the day care a kinder, happier place, one where he is happier even than he is at home. There are no big surprises here, and the heavy-handed message—"We may be closer to the ground than you are, but that doesn't mean you can walk all over us"—detracts from the generally goofy tone. Gene Barretta's chaotic, colorful cartoon-style illustrations help contribute to the story's somewhat forced humor. Reviewer: Norah Piehl
Publishers Weekly

In this follow-up to 2006's SheetzuCacaPoopoo: My Kind of Dog, the mixed-breed, mischievous Max, who is driving his family crazy with his digging and barking, gets sent to doggy day care. Initially unhappy, Max tries his hand as a community organizer, uniting his fellow small dogs against the big bullies ("We deserve to eat at the same time as the big dogs, to nap in the sunny spots, and to get a crack at the ball," Max shouts from his soapbox, a stack of dog dishes). When the larger dogs push back, Max shows them how useful small dogs can be-scratching hard-to-reach itches, retrieving lost toys and serving as the occasional pillow ("I guess you're worth having around after all, little guy," says big dog Brutus). Though the story is slight, Behar's text has heart and charm-like hearing a story from a favorite if overexuberant aunt. Similarly, Barretta's characterizations can seem reminiscent of birthday party caricatures, but the artwork and story have plenty of energy. Ages 6-8. (Mar.)

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School Library Journal

PreS

Another celebrity author tries her hand at writing a children's book and produces a predictable, didactic, and overly cute story. Evie's pup is part Shih Tzu, part cocker spaniel, and part poodle, which makes him a SheetzuCacaPoopoo. Although the word itself may send preschoolers into giggle fits, the story starts out like many other tales of untrained pets that amuse themselves by wrecking the house. The family's solution is to send Max to Doggy Day Care while Evie is at school. On day one, he is bullied by Brutus. On day two, he organizes the small canines like himself to outsmart the bigger dogs. But on day three, Max convinces both sides to compromise and they play happily ever after. An assortment of Disney-type doggies illustrates this uninspired yarn. Kids who want a really animated story with lots of laughs should pick up Nick Bruel's Poor Puppy (Roaring Brook, 2007).-Martha Simpson, Stratford Library Association, CT

Kirkus Reviews
Setting a new standard for superficiality, this blander-than-bland follow-up to SheetzuCacaPoopoo: My Kind of Dog (2006) sends the perky mixed-breed (part Shih Tzu, part cocker spaniel, part poodle) protagonist to doggy day care, where he organizes the cowed little dogs and then tames the aggressive big dogs with sweet reason. Written in flat prose ("Sometimes he barked and disturbed the whole neighborhood"), Behar's predictable (not to mention psychologically unrealistic) text is paired to cutesy cartoon scenes centered on a shaggy little mutt whose anxiety about being in a new place is quickly transformed into smiling confidence as he goes nose-to-nose with a scowling bully and then at the end takes the lead in a triumphant doggy parade. Next to the exploits of other problem-solving pooches like Clifford or Susan Meddaugh's Martha, Max's new outing merits a quick burial in the backyard. (Picture book. 6-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780525420811
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
03/19/2009
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.34(w) x 10.18(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Joy Behar is an actor, writer, comedian, and current cohost of the Emmy Award-winning talk show The View. This is her second book for children. She lives in New York City.

Gene Barretta lives outside of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

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