The Sheik

( 26 )

Overview

"Are you coming in to watch the dancing, Lady Conway?"
"I most decidedly am not. I thoroughly disapprove of the expedition of which this dance is the inauguration. I consider that even by contemplating such a tour alone into the desert with no chaperon or attendant of her own sex, with only native camel drivers and servants, Diana Mayo is behaving with a recklessness and impropriety that is calculated to cast a slur not only on her own reputation, but also on the prestige of her country. I blush to think of it. ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (2) from $6.97   
  • New (2) from $6.97   
The Sheik

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$3.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

"Are you coming in to watch the dancing, Lady Conway?"
"I most decidedly am not. I thoroughly disapprove of the expedition of which this dance is the inauguration. I consider that even by contemplating such a tour alone into the desert with no chaperon or attendant of her own sex, with only native camel drivers and servants, Diana Mayo is behaving with a recklessness and impropriety that is calculated to cast a slur not only on her own reputation, but also on the prestige of her country. I blush to think of it. We English cannot be too careful of our behavior abroad. No opportunity is slight enough for our continental neighbours to cast stones, and this opportunity is very far from being slight. It is the maddest piece of unprincipled folly I have ever heard of."
"Oh, come, Lady Conway! It's not quite so bad as all that. It is certainly unconventional and-er-probably not quite wise, but remember Miss Mayo's unusual upbringing--"
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781499339581
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Publishing
  • Publication date: 5/12/2014
  • Pages: 118
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 26 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(11)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(5)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 9, 2011

    Beautiful story

    Without getting into sex scenes, the story is amazing and leaves everything to your imagination. Fantastic!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 19, 2011

    Recommend it

    It is a love story. No sex scenes but the struggle the captive had with understanding why she falls in love is enough to look past the no sex scenes. The captor is also struggling with coming to terms with love. Again a good short love story....

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 13, 2011

    The Sheik-redemption from rapist to adoring mate

    The magnificence of this love story is the Sheik's growth from rapist and cruel captor to remorseful, adoring mate.
    Diana's courage and spirit change him, steal his heart, and open his eyes to the monster he has become. Her will is crushed by the Sheik; she is terrified of him, and with good reason. She watches him whip a man almost to death the first week she is his prisoner, and break a horse so brutally that he leaves it foaming and bloody.
    Still, she remains courageous. Every night he rapes her; every morning she pulls together the shredded remnants of her sanity and self respect and faces the day. She escapes into the desert with no water, no food, no compass, only her wit and her horse and her determination. Her horse leads her right back to the Sheik and she runs until he shoots her horse from under her. At this point the Stockholm Syndrome and PTSD she is suffering completely overwhelm her, and she succumbs to Trauma Bonding which she mistakes for love.

    Have gotten her back, the Sheik now treats her kindly. It is probable that finding her running in the desert, desperate to escape him, brings to his heart and mind the story of his abused Spanish mother, who also desperately ran from her husband, facing death in the desert rather than stay with her abuser. In his kindness, Diana's Trauma Bonding turns to real love.
    So great is her spirit that the Sheik begins to admire her, and trusts her with a gun to protect herself when she is out riding. He has never trusted a woman like this, and it shows the depth of his burgeoning feelings for her, feelings he does not yet recognize.

    And when Ahmed's rival Omar sends men to capture her, she fights the men and they have to knock her out. When she awakens in Omar's tent, she makes his servants obey her by sheer strength of will. When Omar murders a woman and dumps the body at her feet, she hides her terror by laughing and lighting a cigarette.
    And at the end, when Ahmed has finally realized that he loves her and that he has been a monster, a beast, a brute, a rapist and an all-around bad guy, he determines that the only thing he can do to make it up to her is to get the hell out of her life. Even here Diana's strength shows - she looks honestly at the life she will lead without Ahmed and realizes that she has nothing to live for. Like her father before her, she chooses death rather than a hollow, empty life without love.
    It is her attempted suicide that makes the Sheik realized the depth of her feelings, and that she truly will be happier with him then without him. In this final moment, Diana does in fact conquer her conqueror - he gives up his will of sending her away 'for her own good' and bows to her will to stay.
    In the follow up to this book, The Sons of the Sheik, we read that Ahmed, though he remains the implacable alpha male, and is full of self-loathing at what he has done to Diana and spends the rest of his life as her adoring mate.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 13, 2011

    The Sheik-redemption from rapist to adoring mate

    The magnificence of this love story is the Sheik's growth from rapist and cruel captor to remorseful, adoring mate.
    Diana's courage and spirit change him, steal his heart, and open his eyes to the monster he has become. Her will is crushed by the Sheik; she is terrified of him, and with good reason. She watches him whip a man almost to death the first week she is his prisoner, and break a horse so brutally that he leaves it foaming and bloody.
    Still, she remains courageous. Every night he rapes her; every morning she pulls together the shredded remnants of her sanity and self respect and faces the day. She escapes into the desert with no water, no food, no compass, only her wit and her horse and her determination. Her horse leads her right back to the Sheik and she runs until he shoots her horse from under her. At this point the Stockholm Syndrome and PTSD she is suffering completely overwhelm her, and she succumbs to Trauma Bonding which she mistakes for love.

    Have gotten her back, the Sheik now treats her kindly. It is probable that finding her running in the desert, desperate to escape him, brings to his heart and mind the story of his abused Spanish mother, who also desperately ran from her husband, facing death in the desert rather than stay with her abuser. In his kindness, Diana's Trauma Bonding turns to real love.
    So great is her spirit that the Sheik begins to admire her, and trusts her with a gun to protect herself when she is out riding. He has never trusted a woman like this, and it shows the depth of his burgeoning feelings for her, feelings he does not yet recognize.

    And when Ahmed's rival Omar sends men to capture her, she fights the men and they have to knock her out. When she awakens in Omar's tent, she makes his servants obey her by sheer strength of will. When Omar murders a woman and dumps the body at her feet, she hides her terror by laughing and lighting a cigarette.
    And at the end, when Ahmed has finally realized that he loves her and that he has been a monster, a beast, a brute, a rapist and an all-around bad guy, he determines that the only thing he can do to make it up to her is to get the hell out of her life. Even here Diana's strength shows - she looks honestly at the life she will lead without Ahmed and realizes that she has nothing to live for. Like her father before her, she chooses death rather than a hollow, empty life without love.
    It is her attempted suicide that makes the Sheik realized the depth of her feelings, and that she truly will be happier with him then without him. In this final moment, Diana does in fact conquer her conqueror - he gives up his will of sending her away 'for her own good' and bows to her will to stay.
    In the follow up to this book, The Sons of the Sheik, we read that Ahmed, though he remains the implacable alpha male, and is full of self-loathing at what he has done to Diana and spends the rest of his life as her adoring mate.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 13, 2011

    The Sheik-redemption from rapist to adoring mate

    The magnificence of this love story is the Sheik's growth from rapist and cruel captor to remorseful, adoring mate.
    Diana's courage and spirit change him, steal his heart, and open his eyes to the monster he has become. Her will is crushed by the Sheik; she is terrified of him, and with good reason. She watches him whip a man almost to death the first week she is his prisoner, and break a horse so brutally that he leaves it foaming and bloody.
    Still, she remains courageous. Every night he rapes her; every morning she pulls together the shredded remnants of her sanity and self respect and faces the day. She escapes into the desert with no water, no food, no compass, only her wit and her horse and her determination. Her horse leads her right back to the Sheik and she runs until he shoots her horse from under her. At this point the Stockholm Syndrome and PTSD she is suffering completely overwhelm her, and she succumbs to Trauma Bonding which she mistakes for love.

    Have gotten her back, the Sheik now treats her kindly. It is probable that finding her running in the desert, desperate to escape him, brings to his heart and mind the story of his abused Spanish mother, who also desperately ran from her husband, facing death in the desert rather than stay with her abuser. In his kindness, Diana's Trauma Bonding turns to real love.
    So great is her spirit that the Sheik begins to admire her, and trusts her with a gun to protect herself when she is out riding. He has never trusted a woman like this, and it shows the depth of his burgeoning feelings for her, feelings he does not yet recognize.

    And when Ahmed's rival Omar sends men to capture her, she fights the men and they have to knock her out. When she awakens in Omar's tent, she makes his servants obey her by sheer strength of will. When Omar murders a woman and dumps the body at her feet, she hides her terror by laughing and lighting a cigarette.
    And at the end, when Ahmed has finally realized that he loves her and that he has been a monster, a beast, a brute, a rapist and an all-around bad guy, he determines that the only thing he can do to make it up to her is to get the hell out of her life. Even here Diana's strength shows - she looks honestly at the life she will lead without Ahmed and realizes that she has nothing to live for. Like her father before her, she chooses death rather than a hollow, empty life without love.
    It is her attempted suicide that makes the Sheik realized the depth of her feelings, and that she truly will be happier with him then without him. In this final moment, Diana does in fact conquer her conqueror - he gives up his will of sending her away 'for her own good' and bows to her will to stay.
    In the follow up to this book, The Sons of the Sheik, we read that Ahmed, though he remains the implacable alpha male, and is full of self-loathing at what he has done to Diana and spends the rest of his life as her adoring mate.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 7, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    ;0)

    Not bad for a romance novel written and release in 1919. Kept my interest and even if the Sheik was a bit harsh at time Diana was still a very strong woman. I really enjoyed this book some people may not like how Diana was treated but it is a book of fiction I have seen worst on TV and in other Books.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 11, 2009

    Awsome

    i just happened to come across this book one day and i am so glad that i did! The copy that i have is an original from 1921 so it's practically falling apart, but that dosen't stop me from reading it and re-reading it. Although i was a little weirded out with that fact that he rapes her, you have to remember when the book was written. There are some tender moments and some exciting moments as well and all in all i found this to be great quick read, and hard to put down!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2001

    Great Clinger

    This book was a hard one to put down. Like all books, it has it's dull moment, but just holding on is well worth it. The book flows so nicely and you can actually find yourself falling into it and being right there in the desert with the Sheik. This book comes highly reccommended from me.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2001

    Relax feminists; it's just a book.

    Once you start, you won't be able to put this book down. The Kirkus review complains that this book needs an intro; here's all the intro you need: It was written in 1921. Period. Things were different back then, women were treated differently and inter-racial relationships were unthinkable. Yet the book explores these limits of the day with a rough and tumble heroine and an Arab heartthrob. Hull writes in an incredibly passionate way, detailing every juicy nugget that crosses the mind of the heroine. Many times I found myself thinking, 'Yeah, I'd probably go throught he exact same thought process...' The book communicates enough for the reader to know exactly what goes on when the Sheik grabs the girl, but nothing is explicit and your imagination fills in the blanks better than any blow by blow description could. I found myself blushing at every other page. Advice to feminists: it's just a book; hang your claws at the door, read the book late at night in bed, and then donate it to your local library. You'll never have to admit to your friends that you loved it, but you will carry the memory of it with you for the rest of your life.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2000

    A wonderful desert adventure!

    This book will mystify you and remain with you for days after you have finished it.You will actualy feel like you had a desert adventure of your own. You will want to read it over and over again.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 9, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 12, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 16, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)