The Sheik

The Sheik

4.1 21
by E. M. Hull
     
 

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The novel on which the famous silent movie starring Rudolf Valentino was based. The plot is set in motion as Lady Conway disapproves of Diana's planning a desert trip with just her Arab guides to accompany her. Diana gets kidnapped by the Sheik, Ahmed Ben Hassan. Finally allowed to ride in the desert alone, she plans an escape. However, the Sheik recaptures her. And

Overview

The novel on which the famous silent movie starring Rudolf Valentino was based. The plot is set in motion as Lady Conway disapproves of Diana's planning a desert trip with just her Arab guides to accompany her. Diana gets kidnapped by the Sheik, Ahmed Ben Hassan. Finally allowed to ride in the desert alone, she plans an escape. However, the Sheik recaptures her. And so the story unfolds.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
Most remembered as the source for the famous Valentino movie (of the same name), The Sheik kicks off a new series from the Univ. of Pennsylvania. They intend to reprint genre novels from the distant past, and have begun with this unabashed romance, first published in 1919, and here offered without an explanatory introduction or afterword, which it most definitely needs. How else to justify a book of such silly melodrama, full of enough "orientalist" racism to make Edward Said go ga-ga, and enough misogynist pathology to drive Susan Brownmiller to distraction. The plot is simple enough: a beautiful young Englishwoman—wealthy, adventurous, and unmoved by men—is captured in the Algerian desert by a handsome and muscular sheik who not only tames her and rapes her, but inspires her to love him without reserve. The purple passages abound; the plot mires in the sand dunes. But what is this Middle Eastern soap opera beyond a historically curious piece of schlock? An anticipation of the Stockholm Syndrome, perhaps? Or simply more fodder for those students of anything and everything: the so-called cultural-studies crowd.
From the Publisher
"This was the first real romance novel I ever read and it changed my life."—Jayne Ann Krentz

"The Sheik . . . continues to be an outstanding and highly recommended romance novel for a whole new generation of readers."—Bookwatch

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781514251805
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
06/06/2015
Pages:
126
Sales rank:
618,426
Product dimensions:
5.80(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author

E. M. Hull was the pseudonym of Edith Maude Winstanley Hull, née Henderson (b. 16 August 1880 - d. 11 February 1947) was a British writer of eight romance novels from 1919 to 1939, best known for being the author of the novel The Sheik which became an international best seller in 1921. This novel is credited with starting the hugely popular "desert-romance" genre. Hull followed The Sheik with subsequent novels The Shadow of the East, The Desert Healer, and The Sons of the Sheik.

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The Sheik 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Unending boredom
LadyRavenRAVE1 More than 1 year ago
Not bad for a romance novel written and release in 1919. Kept my interest and even if the Sheik was a bit harsh at time Diana was still a very strong woman. I really enjoyed this book some people may not like how Diana was treated but it is a book of fiction I have seen worst on TV and in other Books.
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Jacqueline Nareski More than 1 year ago
Without getting into sex scenes, the story is amazing and leaves everything to your imagination. Fantastic!
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Carie More than 1 year ago
It is a love story. No sex scenes but the struggle the captive had with understanding why she falls in love is enough to look past the no sex scenes. The captor is also struggling with coming to terms with love. Again a good short love story....
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manonfetch More than 1 year ago
The magnificence of this love story is the Sheik's growth from rapist and cruel captor to remorseful, adoring mate. Diana's courage and spirit change him, steal his heart, and open his eyes to the monster he has become. Her will is crushed by the Sheik; she is terrified of him, and with good reason. She watches him whip a man almost to death the first week she is his prisoner, and break a horse so brutally that he leaves it foaming and bloody. Still, she remains courageous. Every night he rapes her; every morning she pulls together the shredded remnants of her sanity and self respect and faces the day. She escapes into the desert with no water, no food, no compass, only her wit and her horse and her determination. Her horse leads her right back to the Sheik and she runs until he shoots her horse from under her. At this point the Stockholm Syndrome and PTSD she is suffering completely overwhelm her, and she succumbs to Trauma Bonding which she mistakes for love. Have gotten her back, the Sheik now treats her kindly. It is probable that finding her running in the desert, desperate to escape him, brings to his heart and mind the story of his abused Spanish mother, who also desperately ran from her husband, facing death in the desert rather than stay with her abuser. In his kindness, Diana's Trauma Bonding turns to real love. So great is her spirit that the Sheik begins to admire her, and trusts her with a gun to protect herself when she is out riding. He has never trusted a woman like this, and it shows the depth of his burgeoning feelings for her, feelings he does not yet recognize. And when Ahmed's rival Omar sends men to capture her, she fights the men and they have to knock her out. When she awakens in Omar's tent, she makes his servants obey her by sheer strength of will. When Omar murders a woman and dumps the body at her feet, she hides her terror by laughing and lighting a cigarette. And at the end, when Ahmed has finally realized that he loves her and that he has been a monster, a beast, a brute, a rapist and an all-around bad guy, he determines that the only thing he can do to make it up to her is to get the hell out of her life. Even here Diana's strength shows - she looks honestly at the life she will lead without Ahmed and realizes that she has nothing to live for. Like her father before her, she chooses death rather than a hollow, empty life without love. It is her attempted suicide that makes the Sheik realized the depth of her feelings, and that she truly will be happier with him then without him. In this final moment, Diana does in fact conquer her conqueror - he gives up his will of sending her away 'for her own good' and bows to her will to stay. In the follow up to this book, The Sons of the Sheik, we read that Ahmed, though he remains the implacable alpha male, and is full of self-loathing at what he has done to Diana and spends the rest of his life as her adoring mate.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book will mystify you and remain with you for days after you have finished it.You will actualy feel like you had a desert adventure of your own. You will want to read it over and over again.