Shenandoah Summer: The 1864 Valley Campaign

Shenandoah Summer: The 1864 Valley Campaign

4.0 1
by Scott C. Patchan
     
 

ISBN-10: 0803218869

ISBN-13: 9780803218864

Pub. Date: 04/01/2009

Publisher: UNP - Bison Books


Jubal A. Early’s disastrous battles in the Shenandoah Valley ultimately resulted in his ignominious dismissal. But Early’s lesser-known summer campaign of 1864, between his raid on Washington and Phil Sheridan’s renowned fall campaign, had a significant impact on the political and military landscape of the time. By focusing on military tactics…  See more details below

Overview


Jubal A. Early’s disastrous battles in the Shenandoah Valley ultimately resulted in his ignominious dismissal. But Early’s lesser-known summer campaign of 1864, between his raid on Washington and Phil Sheridan’s renowned fall campaign, had a significant impact on the political and military landscape of the time. By focusing on military tactics and battle history in uncovering the facts and events of these little-understood battles, Scott C. Patchan offers a new perspective on Early’s contributions to the Confederate war effort—and to Union battle plans and politicking.
 
Patchan details the previously unexplored battles at Rutherford’s Farm and Kernstown (a pinnacle of Confederate operations in the Shenandoah Valley) and examines the campaign’s influence on President Lincoln’s reelection efforts. He also provides insights into the personalities, careers, and roles in Shenandoah of Confederate general John C. Breckinridge, Union general George Crook, and Union colonel James A. Mulligan, with his “fighting Irish” brigade from Chicago. Finally, Patchan reconsiders the ever-colorful and controversial Early himself, whose importance in the Confederate military pantheon this book at last makes clear.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803218864
Publisher:
UNP - Bison Books
Publication date:
04/01/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
408
Sales rank:
956,437
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations ix

List of Maps ix

Acknowledgments xi

Introduction 1

1 The Most Successful Expedition: Retreat from Washington, July 11-12, 1864 8

2 Who Has the Management: Union Pursuit, July 11-15, 1864 27

3 But Little is Expected from Our Pursuit: Loudoun Valley to the Blue Ridge, July 16-17, 1864 42

4 Whipped Most Awfully: The Battle of Cool Spring, July 18, 1864 60

5 The Panic Was Over: The Battle of Cool Spring, July 18, 1864 83

6 Rock Them Like All Creation: Berry's Ferry and Kabletown, July 19, 1864 105

7 A Miracle of Execution: The Battle of Rutherford's Farm, July 20, 1864 127

8 The Object of the Expedition Accomplished: Wright Leaves the Valley, July 19-22, 1864 152

9 A Cavalry Scare: Prelude to Kernstown, July 23, 1864 170

10 Attack the Enemy at Once: The Second Battle of Kernstown, July 23-24, 1864 182

11 A Perfect Stampede: The Second Battle of Kernstown, July 24, 1864 205

12 Bull Run Was Nothing in Comparison: Retreat to the Potomac, July 24-27, 1864 229

13 Defeat Was a Matter of Course: The Second Battle of Kernstown Analysis 258

14 Burn the Entire Town: McCausland's Chambersburg Raid, July 28-August 4, 1864 271

15 Like a Fiery Meteor: The Battle of Moorefield, August 1864 291

16 L'Envoi: Conclusion 311

Appendix A Mrs. Marian Mulligan 321

Appendix B Shenandoah Valley Campaign: July 1864 Order of Battle 329

Notes 337

Bibliography 369

Index 385

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Shenandoah Summer: The 1864 Valley Campaign 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
dccaughey More than 1 year ago
In Shenandoah Summer, author Scott Patchan provides the definitive examination of the Civil war actions in the Shenandoah Valley during the summer of 1864. While few works on the war to date provide even a chapter on the campaign, Mr. Patchan reveals a wealth of information and detail that is a delight to read. Despite the title, I will admit that I purchased the book assuming that it would discuss Sheridan's campaign in the Valley. In this I was very pleasantly surprised. Instead of Sheridan's campaign, I was treated to a thorough examination of a campaign that I had previously known very little about. The majority of this book concerns the actions between Early's raid on Washington and Sheridan's Valley campaign of the fall. Instead of reading of the success of Sheridan's campaign, the reader learns the reasons why Sheridan's campaign had to take place. Patchan skillfully blends the results of meticulous research with a vivid, readable writing style. His exhaustive research through previously unpublished works produces the detail readers hope for in this sort of book but all too seldom receive. His descriptions of individual actions and combat at the regimental level bring the action to life for the reader. Despite the detail of his narrative, Patchan does a remarkable job of keeping the reader aware of the larger context within which the campaign takes place. Concurrent campaigns and elections had serious ramifications for actions in the Valley that summer. The difference in approach from the high commands on both sides I found particularly interesting. On the Confederate side, Lee seemed to support early as much as he could. On the Federal side, however, the "help" seemed to be in the form of pressure to make something happen instead of providing resources and assistance. Early's series of defeats in the Valley ultimately led to his dismissal, but Mr. Patchan depicts Early as a wily, opportunistic adversary who takes advantage of forces greatly outnumbering his own. He also objectively lays out the major difficulties facing his Union opponents, most notably division of responsibility and unity of command. As is often the case with campaign studies, it would help if this book had a few more maps. A map of the retreat from Washington in particular would make the narration more understandable. There are a number of excellent maps and diagrams in the work, however, which greatly help readers follow the various maneuvering and battles of the campaign. Clearly Mr. Patchan has walked this ground and has an appreciation for terrain. Overall, I found this book enjoyable and very enlightening on a previously obscure topic. Thorough research and clear prose make this a work any student of the Civil War will appreciate.