Shenandoah Watercolors

Overview

Author/farm wife Beth Trissel shares the joys and challenges of rural life on her family's small farm located in the scenic Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Journey with her through the seasons on the farm, owned by her family since the 1930's, and savor the richness of her cherished gardens and beloved valley. This journal is a poignant, often humorous, sometimes sad glimpse into a vanishing way of life for anyone who loves or yearns for the country and even those who don't. ...
See more details below
Paperback
$16.91
BN.com price
(Save 15%)$19.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (4) from $14.77   
  • New (3) from $14.77   
  • Used (1) from $21.36   
Sending request ...

Overview

Author/farm wife Beth Trissel shares the joys and challenges of rural life on her family's small farm located in the scenic Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Journey with her through the seasons on the farm, owned by her family since the 1930's, and savor the richness of her cherished gardens and beloved valley. This journal is a poignant, often humorous, sometimes sad glimpse into a vanishing way of life for anyone who loves or yearns for the country and even those who don't.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781470165130
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform
  • Publication date: 3/14/2012
  • Pages: 102
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.26 (d)

Meet the Author

Married to my high school sweetheart, I live on a farm in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia surrounded by my children, grandbabies, and assorted animals. An avid gardener, my love of herbs and heirloom plants figures into my writing. The rich history of Virginia is at the heart of my inspiration. In addition to American settings, I also write historical and time travel romances set in the British Isles.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 25, 2011

    A Fantastic Read!

    Even though I've lived in both cities and rural areas, I've always considered myself a city girl although that's probably a misnomer. Truthfully, I'm overwhelmed by city life and fast grow bored with life in the country. Whenever I'm living in the city, I yearn for a less complicated life; when living in the country, I yearn for all the stimuli a city provides. Which typically leaves me in the suburbs, but that's another story. I recently read Beth Trissel's Shenandoah Watercolors, a series of short essays which account a year's time on her family's rural farm in the Virginian Shenandoah Valley. Full of rich imagery and fantastic characters in the forms of people, house pets, and farm animals, Mrs. Trissel has cured me of one thing: the idea that living in a rural area is less complicated than living in the city. It's complicated all right: farm animals must be raised, sometimes by hand. Cows are ushered from areas they're determined to plunder, fences be damned. Pets wreak their particular brand of havoc in the house, carefully hoarded spoils overriding the aftermath of broken items and strewn garbage from unsealed trash bags. There's constant worry about flooding and droughts and broken-down equipment; no harvest means more debt and tight finances. Throughout all of this threads the familial and neighborly relationships - a sense of community seldom seen in city life. When trouble strikes - be it concern over a crop or the unexpected death of a much loved and anticipated, newly born grandchild - families and neighbors come together to help and nurture each other in any way they can. I was struck by Mrs. Trissel's summation: "The problem with cities is that people don't learn what really matters. Don't really feel or know the rhythms of the earth. When we are separated from that vital center place, we grow lost." While the grass always seems to be greener in someone else's pasture, I'm inclined to agree with her assessment. While I don't think farm life should be everyone's calling, I do feel that we can all learn much from stopping to smell the flowers and reconnecting with the part of ourselves that isn't connected to the conveniences of modern-day life. In our haste to have the latest high-tech toys, we tend to neglect the very things that keep us grounded in our humanity.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)