Sherlock Holmes: The Breath of God [NOOK Book]

Overview

When several leading society figures begin acting out of character, Holmes is enlisted on an investigation that will see him team up with famed ghost hunter Thomas Carnacki, and the famous occultist Aleister Crowley.

 As London fills up with mindless zombies, possessed by the spirits in the air, Holmes must descend beneath the city via the new underground ...
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Sherlock Holmes: The Breath of God

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Overview

When several leading society figures begin acting out of character, Holmes is enlisted on an investigation that will see him team up with famed ghost hunter Thomas Carnacki, and the famous occultist Aleister Crowley.

 As London fills up with mindless zombies, possessed by the spirits in the air, Holmes must descend beneath the city via the new underground train network to combat the source. 

A brand-new original novel, detailing a thrilling new case for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's timeless creation.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Sherlock Holmes joins an all-star team of psychic investigators in Adams's intriguing if uneven pastiche. One of them, Algernon Blackwood's Dr. John Silence, comes to Baker Street after his experiences on a case of demonic possession. Via the body of a young girl, a demonic entity gave Silence three names: Hilary De Montfort, the Laird of Boleskine, and Sherlock Holmes. De Montfort is found dead the very morning of Silence's visit to 221B, his corpse savagely battered, as if it had been dropped from a great height. The Laird of Boleskine turns out to be real-life occultist Aleister Crowley. While Holmes is skeptical of Silence's view that a supernatural force known as the Breath of God killed De Montfort, the detective involves himself in the mystery. For good measure, Adams (Restoration) throws William Hope Hodgson's Carnacki into the mix as well as a character from M.R. James's tale "Casting the Runes." Holmes's hyper-rationalism never gels with the decidedly otherworldly plot line, though Adams does a better-than-average job in portraying him and Watson.
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From the Publisher
"Highly recommended." -Dread Central

"Engrossing." -Anything Horror

"Holmes’ dialogue is razor sharp." - Never Not A Nerd

"An adventure worth taking." - The Trades

"[A] fusion of supernatural and weird fiction." - Spooky Reads

"Crisp wit, high adventure, knowing nods to literary fans, and a well plotted mystery." - The Daily Rotation

“Sherlock Holmes: The Breath Of God” is great fun. Let me assure you if you like Sherlock Holmes then you are going to really enjoy this.” – Vic’s Media Room    

Praise for Guy Adams:

"This is the kind of book that 'Best of Lists' were made for." - Graeme's Fantasy Book Review

"A fearless, hurtling hell of a debut." - Christopher Fowler

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780857686008
  • Publisher: Titan
  • Publication date: 9/20/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 142,414
  • File size: 331 KB

Meet the Author

Guy Adams trained and worked as an actor for twelve years before becoming a full-time writer. He is the co-author of The Case Notes of Sherlock Holmes, has written several tie-ins to the TV series Life on Mars. His most recent novel is Restoration, the follow-up to the much-praised horror novel, The World House.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2
( 17 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(9)

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 17 of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 23, 2012

    The Hardy Boys Meet Ghostbusters

    Not for true Sherlock fans. A Holmes book in name only . . . he barely makes an appearance and has nothing to do with the actual plot. The writer tries to mimic something between King and Koontz and fails at both. Predictable; had to force myself to finish it. "The House of Silk" was much better.

    14 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2012

    Dreadful Stuff

    A simply dreadful novel with good writing and no plot. Dreadful mind-numbing mush.

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 8, 2012

    Sherlock Holmes meets Aliester Crowley and Thomas carnacki

    This novel is full of late Nineteenth Century practitioners of magic along with a number of events that seem to defy scientific explanation. In spite of these elements, it remains a case well-suited to investigation by the techniques of the world’s first consulting detective. Holmes and Watson are solicited by one Doctor Silence, a medical practitioner who specializes in ‘psychic’ maladies. He relates a tale of his recent experiences that links Sherlock Holmes’ name with those of a new cadaver whose cause of death is undetermined and with Aleister Crowley, a member of “The Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn.” Other events of questionable nature thrust themselves upon Holmes and Watson, all seemingly without reason and with no apparent connections. Langdale Pike confirms several pieces of information that connect the corpse to Crowley and “The Golden Dawn,” so Holmes and Watson begin the trip with Dr. Silence to Crowley’s ‘manor’ outside Inverness. On the train to Scotland, Watson and Dr. Silence encounter a supernatural visitation that ends in the death of a bystander. As part of that conflict, they also meet Thomas Carnacki, a supernatural detective of some growing fame. Holmes is spared this experience, but is later introduced to Carnacki who fills him in on what that investigator has met to set him on the same trail to find Crowley. Holmes decides to leave the group before they get to Inverness. From this point on, the plot becomes complicated. Once at Inverness, Crowley claims that a splinter group of the Golden Dawn are planning to use an ancient magical weapon to cause chaos that will frighten society into the more traditional position of fearing the arcane arts and the powers at their command. Several lines of events are detailed and examined for pointers to the miscreants and their place of power. At least five distinct methods of individual supernatural attack are described in some detail along with defenses and counters used by the detectives. Events follow thick and fast and evidence for supernatural assaults mounts every day. Crowley’s manor is besieged and the defense is complex and exhausting. For example, Dr. Watson alternates with Carnacki in firing silver bullets to destroy invading demon figures and Crowley and Dr. Silence exhaust themselves psychically in defending against the nightly onslaughts by shadowy figures from Beyond. In the following day, Sherlock returns from his independent investigations to join the council of war. Finally, a location is pinpointed in the newly constructed portion of the London Underground System and the entire crew head back to London to ‘cleanse’ the system. Once the whole group are in place to begin the process, Holmes calls for a halt and begins to explain who has been doing what to whom. The explanation is necessarily long and complex, but it does point out who was responsible for which murders and how the magical effects were produced. The details are a bit ‘sketchy’ but the processes are identified along with the perpetrators. Taken as a whole, the book is fast paced, very interesting and very well written. The author seems to be aware of “The Illusion of Holmes” as I have called the methods used by Doyle to present Sherlock Holmes to his readers, and they are used well. For this reason, the book has much of the flavor of the Canon, even though the subject matter lies in an area Doyle would never have attempted with Holmes. Strict students of th

    8 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2012

    it was a different holmes

    It took quite a while for me to get in this book. It was an interesting take on maybe a younger version on holmes??? like i said it took a time for this book to get to the good stuff and boy when it got there I couldn't put it down! but once the conflict started to resolve it was quick, predictable and well the tradition who done it at the end. Holmes doesn't play a huge part in this book. Its a story told by watson about his experience not so much "their" experience. it was a good read .

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 26, 2012

    Poodle poop

    Lol

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2013

    Why is this book called Breath of God when it is about demons, z

    Why is this book called Breath of God when it is about demons, zombies, and psychic events? House of Silk was very good and Holmes was believable. This doesn't seem Holmes's style.

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  • Posted July 18, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Guy Adams in his book, "Sherlock Holmes: The Breath Of God&

    Guy Adams in his book, "Sherlock Holmes: The Breath Of God" a Book in the Encounters of Sherlock Holmes series published by Titan Books brings us a new adventure featuring Sherlock Holmes.




    From the Back Cover: The dead are rising




    The nineteenth century is about to draw to a close. In its place will come the twentieth, a century of change, a century of science, a century that will see the superstitions of the past swept away.




    There are some who are determined to see that never happens. A body is found crushed to death in the London snow. There are no footprints anywhere near it. It is almost as if the man was killed by the air itself. This is the first in a series of attacks that sees a handful of London's most prominent occultists murdered. While pursuing the case, Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson find themselves travelling to Scotland to meet with the one person they have been told can help: Aleister Crowley.




    As dark powers encircle them, Holmes' rationalist beliefs begin to be questioned. The unbelievable and unholy are on their trail as they gather a group of the most accomplished occult minds in the country: Doctor John Silence, the so-called "Psychic Doctor"; supernatural investigator Thomas Carnacki; runic expert and demonologist, Julian Karswell...




    But will they be enough? As the century draws to a close it seems London is ready to fall and the infernal abyss is growing wide enough to swallow us all.




    A brand-new original novel, detailing a thrilling new case for the acclaimed detective Sherlock Holmes.




    This is the first book in the series written by Guy Adams, however it is the second one that I have read. I say that because the second one is more true to Holmes than this one. While this Holmes tale rates up there as terrific I was disappointed because of the highly supernatural element to this story. Holmes and Watson team up with four supernatural investigators to combat the menace that is threatening London at the turn of the century. I am not familiar with the stories in which Silence, Carnacki and Karswell originated which means I probably missed out on some references that would have been obvious to people with such familiarity. I think I might have enjoyed this book more if Mr. Adams had given me more background on these characters. However the story goes along at a roller-coaster pace and this book is a page turning thriller. Don't let me deter you, "Sherlock Holmes: The Breath Of God" is great fun. Let me assure you if you like Sherlock Holmes then you are going to really enjoy this.




    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Titan Books. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 24, 2013

    I gave up on this one about 45 pages in because of the bad writi

    I gave up on this one about 45 pages in because of the bad writing and appalling grammatical errors. I found them so distracting that I couldn't think about finishing the book.

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  • Posted July 26, 2012

    A read for when you have nothing better to do.

    I read this book but was sorely disapointed. Not like Sir Arthur Conen Doyle at all.

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  • Posted July 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    This was a great story

    Sherlock has always been an interesting character and it was wonderful to read about another case solved

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2012

    Absolutely Not

    Demons + Mr. Sherlock Holmes? I don't think this should ever have been written. An insult to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's memory.

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    Posted July 26, 2012

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    Posted August 4, 2012

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    Posted June 26, 2012

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    Posted June 26, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2013

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    Posted June 26, 2012

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