Shielding the Flame: An Intimate Conversation with Merek Edelman, One of the Last Surviving Leaders of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising by Hanna Krall, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Shielding the Flame: An Intimate Conversation with Merek Edelman, One of the Last Surviving Leaders of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

Shielding the Flame: An Intimate Conversation with Merek Edelman, One of the Last Surviving Leaders of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

3.0 1
by Hanna Krall
     
 

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780030060021
Publisher:
Holt, Henry & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
08/28/1986
Edition description:
1st American ed
Pages:
124

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Shielding the Flame 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I understand that this review may be somewhat incoherent, thank you for bearing with me. This was a very touching and moving read. The book is much more than an account of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising from a survivor's perspective. The title truly lives up to its name because, as I was reading it, I felt as if I was truly getting to know the survivor on a personal level. I understood the regrets, justifications and other emotions she harbored, looking back on the event. My only issue with the book (and the reason I'm rating it at only three stars) is the way it is written. The book is not written like a narrative but is actually a translation of an interview. The original, polish author,  Hannah Krall, and the translator, Lawrence Weschler,  both acknowledge the seemingly unusual way the book is written. The book jumps from past (Edelman's narrative) to present (Krall's interview) on a dime usually without warning.   However it didn't  take long to get accustomed to the style of writing, and I'm only a high school sophomore. Since this is more of a personal reflection of a survivor rather than an analysis of the events, it is not an ideal source for someone who  is doing general research about the holocaust. For me, the message of this book is a profound insight on how we label people as "heros" and how often it is applied with a lack of context. Regardless, I was very touched by this book and I highly recommend it to anyone trying to gain a deeper  understanding of the Warsaw ghetto uprising as more than a simple chronology of events.