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Shin Gi Tai: Karate Training for Body, Mind, and Spirit
     

Shin Gi Tai: Karate Training for Body, Mind, and Spirit

4.0 1
by Michael Clarke
 

Winner - 2012 International Book AwardFinalist - 2012 Book of the Year Award by ForeWord MagazineHonorable Mention - 2013 Eric Hoffer AwardWithin these pages, you will discover traditional karate; along the way, perhaps many of your own beliefs about karate will be confronted.
You might have a body capable of mastering karate’s physical techniques,

Overview

Winner - 2012 International Book AwardFinalist - 2012 Book of the Year Award by ForeWord MagazineHonorable Mention - 2013 Eric Hoffer AwardWithin these pages, you will discover traditional karate; along the way, perhaps many of your own beliefs about karate will be confronted.
You might have a body capable of mastering karate’s physical techniques,
but do you have a mind with a level of awareness that is able to grasp the true spirit of karate?
For adults only. Regardless of how many people you can defeat in combat, the deeper aim of karate has always been to conquer your own ego, and by doing so, you increase the likelihood of avoiding conflict. When you can control your ego, you have a chance to establish peace in your life: this is the tradition of budo karate.
Shin Gi Tai has a literal translation:
mind–technique–body.
A karate-ka’s mind (shin) must be developed ahead of his technique (gi)
if he is to discover a sense of balance within his body (tai). While the mental and physical aspects of karate are daunting and causes many to stop training, if you can just endure the early years, say - the first decade - then there is opportunity for real and lasting benefits.
Budo is a concept more often discussed than put into practice, and yet, as part of traditional karate training, it has the capacity to dramatically change lives for the better, but only if you are prepared to move past the obvious and strive to understand the philosophy and the morality of budo.
Your life is yours, your karate is yours, accept ownership of both and reap countless rewards.

Editorial Reviews

Dr. Damon Young
"The spirit of karate is alive and well in Shin Gi Tai"
Stan Schmidt
"Aim high and train hard, go to the source of your karate, and seek its essence."
John Porta
"Michael Clarke re-introduces the traditional approach to karate training in a way that can be well understood."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594392177
Publisher:
Ymaa Publication Center
Publication date:
10/16/2011
Pages:
296
Product dimensions:
7.20(w) x 9.20(h) x 0.80(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Michael Clarke, Kyoshi 7th dan, Okinawan Goju-ryu, has trained in karate since 1974. He has written over three hundred articles for international martial arts magazines and authored four books. A young 'street fighter' in England who became a disciplined student of budo in Okinawa, Clarke enthusiastically teaches traditional Goju-ryu Karate in his dojo in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia.

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Shin GI Tai: Karate Training for Body, Mind, and Spirit 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
BertEdens More than 1 year ago
I received this book from its publisher YMAA for the purposes of reviewing the book. As a fairly short-time martial artist, about 14 years as of this writing, I was excited about learning from someone like Master Michael Clarke, who has been practicing for several decades. The book promises to educate you on the body, mind and spirit of karate, knowing in Japanese as Shin Gi Tai.  While I believe the book definitely touches on each of these areas, it seemed like those concepts were secondary to a history of karate, and specifically Goju Ryu, which the author practices. The origin of karate in Okinawa certainly is important to the mindset of a career karateka, but it almost felt like it was overdone.  The only thing I really have a quibble with is the author's position that a dojo cannot be teaching true budo, or the martial way, if they are a commercial or sport dojo. While I know there are certainly McDojos out there who are looking only to make a buck without going any deeper than developing self-confidence through belt promotion and competition success, I believe it's a fallacy to portray those karate clubs as incapable of teaching anything deeper. I certainly understand the author runs a very traditional dojo, and I respect him for that, as not everyone will look for that as a student or as an instructor, but I don't believe it has to be as black and white as the author purports.  All that said, I did really enjoy the book, especially as a martial arts historian myself, albeit leaning more toward Korean arts. But knowing the arts are all intertwined and have similar origins, the history of one is important to the history of them all. I would definitely recommend this book for anyone wanting to learn more about the history of Okinawa and karate in general, especially the more traditional aspects of the art.