Ship by David Macaulay, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Ship

Ship

5.0 5
by David Macaulay
     
 

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Join a group of underwater archaeologists as they search for a long-lost caravel in the reefs of the Caribbean Sea. A combination of drawings, maps, and diagrams details the ship's recovery, and as clues to the past are pieced together, a story emerges."Fascinating in its dual perspective, Ship involves readers through Macaulay's original approach to an intriguing

Overview

Join a group of underwater archaeologists as they search for a long-lost caravel in the reefs of the Caribbean Sea. A combination of drawings, maps, and diagrams details the ship's recovery, and as clues to the past are pieced together, a story emerges."Fascinating in its dual perspective, Ship involves readers through Macaulay's original approach to an intriguing subject." -- Booklist, starred review

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In Ship , as in many of his earlier books, Macaulay tells more than one story and does so in more than one way. The book begins with a fictional archeological crew salvaging the remains of a caravel, a 500-year-old sailing ship, from the bottom of the ocean. The tale is related through Macaulay's vivid pencil drawings, through text accompanying the illustrations, and also through documents and letters in the artwork. Though almost no pictures or descriptions of actual caravels survive today, Macaulay shows how archeologists and historians have pieced together an idea of the likely look and construction of these ships. Then, halfway through the book, Macaulay begins another tale--the design, financing, contracting, construction and launch of that same fictional caravel in the year 1405. Subdued watercolors accompany the ``diary'' of the Spanish merchant who commissioned that ship. Though Macaulay barely portrays the actual voyage, he has nonetheless crafted an exciting story out of the details of marine archeology, historical sleuthing, and the ancient building and equipping of an ocean-going sailing ship. Though the text and book are brief, the depth of the coverage is surprising--Macaulay plays with the relationships between time and color, words and illustrations, and he varies visual perspectives to offer a rich reading experience. Ages 10-up. (Oct.)
Children's Literature - Beverly Kobrin
Mr. Macaulay's thoroughly researched fiction (see his acknowledgements) makes clear the interdependence of archaeologists and historians as it depicts the recovery of artifacts from and the sinking and construction of-in that order-the 16th-century caravel Magdelena.
School Library Journal
Gr 6 Up-Macaulay is a yarn spinner who utilizes both language and pictures to entertain as he informs. The story he tells here is how marine archaeologists go about finding a fictional caravel that sank in the Caribbean in the 16th century. Maria Sousa and her fellow divers search the reefs for signs of the wreck, and then uncover the contents and pieces of the ship itself. Additional intriguing insights are offered as historical records, primarily in the form of a journal found in Spanish archives, which pinpoints the vessel's building and mission. The history alone could be presented as a traditional detective story. But Macaulay creates a visual narrative that details the actual tools, processes, etc. He takes the action underwater into a blue-tinted world where the team lays down an archaeological grid and carefully digs and records their findings. The scenes on the surface and land are, by contrast, in black and white and show the steps in cleaning and preserving the sea-soaked artifacts. The 44-page journal describes the construction of the ship from keel-laying to sailing. Watercolor paintings in shades of browns and blues show the gradual evolution of the Magdalena in her shipyard womb. In these scenes, the artist creates a believable reality while making the shipwright's technology comprehensible. Macaulay's text is another example of his skill in shaping language aesthetically, to deliver the facts with a twinkle of humor and the pulse of adventure. He weds words and pictures in rich and rewarding ways.-Kenneth Marantz, Art Education Department, Ohio State University, Columbus
Carolyn Phelan
"They were the space shuttles of the fifteenth century--small wooden ships called caravels, built to reach, explore, and return from the unknown." "Ship" describes the present-day discovery and recovery of artifacts from a caravel that sank in the Caribbean some 500 years ago, and, based on information from the find, the narrative goes back in time to the building of that ship in a Seville shipyard in 1504. Although the particular ship, called the "Magdalena," is fictional, the book is based on historians' and archaeologists' research and recovery techniques. Pencil drawings, in blue and gray on white paper, show the action at the underwater site as well as documents, maps, diagrams, and letters, which add authenticity. The discovery of the" Magdalena "begins a story that unfolds with quiet drama as the research team finds traces of a ship, seeks government permission to explore and retrieve artifacts, learns that treasure hunters have visited the site, organizes an underwater archaeological dig, removes artifacts, identifies and preserves them, and makes a precise diagram of the site; they then receive a copy of a diary discovered in a Spanish archival library. The second half of the book reproduces the diary, in which a sixteenth-century merchant records in words and pictures the building of the caravel, from his choice of timbers in the forest to his reflections as the boat prepares to set sail. Appearing on cream-colored pages, the diary is illustrated with watercolor paintings, mainly in sepia and blue. Fascinating in its dual perspective, "Ship" involves readers through Macaulay's original approach to an intriguing subject.
From the Publisher

"Fascinating in its dual perspective, Ship involves readers through Macaulay's original approach to an intriguing subject." Booklist, ALA, Starred Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395524398
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
10/28/1993
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
7.75(w) x 12.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
10 - 12 Years

Meet the Author


David Macaulay is an award-winning author and illustrator whose books have sold millions of copies in the United States alone, and his work has been translated into a dozen languages. Macaulay has garnered numerous awards including the Caldecott Medal and Honor Awards, the Boston Globe–Horn Book Award, the Christopher Award, an American Institute of Architects Medal, and the Washington Post–Children’s Book Guild Nonfiction Award. In 2006, he was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, given “to encourage people of outstanding talent to pursue their own creative, intellectual, and professional inclinations.” Superb design, magnificent illustrations, and clearly presented information distinguish all of his books. David Macaulay lives with his family in Vermont.

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Ship 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Rubs you pu.ssy"
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Qwerty
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
July 18th
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"July seventeenth, two thousand thirteen a.d. at exactly one fourty seven p.m. eastern time."