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Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball
     

Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball

5.0 2
by Harvey Frommer
 

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Another peek at baseball's good old days—or, in this case, bad old days—by veteran sports-historian Harvey Frommer. Frommer paints Shoeless Joe as a baseball natural ("Joe Jackson hit the ball harder than any man ever to play baseball"—Ty Cobb), an illiterate hick (his table utensils consisted of knife and fingers), and an innocent man snared by the

Overview

Another peek at baseball's good old days—or, in this case, bad old days—by veteran sports-historian Harvey Frommer. Frommer paints Shoeless Joe as a baseball natural ("Joe Jackson hit the ball harder than any man ever to play baseball"—Ty Cobb), an illiterate hick (his table utensils consisted of knife and fingers), and an innocent man snared by the greatest scandal in baseball history.

Editorial Reviews

USA Today
"A fresh look at the Black Sox scandal."
Houston Post
"New insight into baseball's greatest disgrace."
Yankees Magazine
"A must read -should be the final word on the 1919 White Sox."
Sports Books File
"A definitive book about Joe Jackson."
Dallas Morning News
"Absolutely essential reading. Enlightening text. A vivid biography."
Larry King
"An extraordinary publication. Terrific read. What a book."
Village Voice
"Fresh perspectives. Deserves a place on your shelf right next to Eight men Out."
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Frommer's 30th book is a distinctly minor effort. It tells the tale of the illiterate South Carolina boy who had what Ty Cobb described as the most natural swing in baseball and who was banished from the game following the Black Sox scandal of 1919. But Frommer adds little to what is already known. He makes clear, as have other authors, that Joe Jackson was almost certainly not one of the Chicago players who conspired with gamblers to lose the World Series, although he was approached by those who had and did not report the contacts. Frommer does a fine job of pointing up the dissension between the cliques on the team and makes a plea for Jackson's admission to the Hall of Fame. The book includes a valuable appendix presenting Jackson's testimony before a Chicago grand jury, which reinforces the contention that the player was indeed a tragic victim. Photos not seen by PW. (July)
Utica Observer Dispatch
Get the book. It's a fascinating and fast read.
— Gene Carney
San Antonio Express News
...an interesting collection of data about the Black Sox scandal and the times that spawned it.
Baseball Weekly
A fresh look at the 1919 Black Sox scandal.
The Houston Post
...expertly re-creates the so-called ragtime era when players were miserably paid by their owners—none worse than White Sox owner Charles Comiskey—and gambling was common.
The Village Voice
Fresh perspectives. Everyone from Judge Landis to Alan Dershowitz is called in as a witness. Deserves a place on your shelf right next to Eight Men Out.
Utica Observer Dispatch - Gene Carney
Get the book. It's a fascinating and fast read.
The Dallas Morning News
A vivid biography of the greatest natural hitter ever, and a thoughtful, tightly reasoned plea for reconsideration of his ban from baseball.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780803218628
Publisher:
University of Nebraska Press
Publication date:
09/01/2008
Pages:
264
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.60(d)

Meet the Author

Harvey Frommer is the celebrated author of more than forty-two sports books, including Remembering Yankee Stadium, Remembering Fenway Park, and A Yankee Century. Frommer is a professor in the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program at Dartmouth College. He lives in Lyme, New Hampshire.

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Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The book centers on one of the greatest baseball players ever and goes further into events happening in and away from baseball during 1900-1920s. It doesn't focus on the trite clichés which are commonly affiliated with Joe Jackson and the other White Sox players but rather on who Joe Jackson truly was. A great book and a must read!
Guest More than 1 year ago
¿A tremendous account. . . I must refer anyone who has any interest in the Black Sox Scandal to Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball. There is a shiny gold sticker on the jacket of Frommer's book, by the way, announcing that it contains "Never before published -- Joe Jackson's complete Grand Jury Testimony." . . .The testimony is worth reading. Frommer quotes Joe Jackson: "I never said anything about it [the plot to throw the Series] until the night before the Series started. I went to see Mr Comiskey and begged him to take me out of the lineup .... If there was something going on I knew the bench was the safest place, but he wouldn't listen to me...." I would love to fill about ten pages with excerpts from Shoeless Joe and Ragtime Baseball, but will not. Get the book. It's a fascinating and fast read.