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Shoo! Scat!
     

Shoo! Scat!

by Lois G. Grambling
 

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Professor Flugel has a problem. Every morning, he fills his bird feeder with birdseed and every morning Gray Squirrel scares away all of the birds and eats the birdseed himself. Every morning, Professor Flugel tries something new to keep Gray Squirrel from eating his birdseed. Spraying water at Gray Squirrel does not work. Neither does putting the bird feeder in the middle of an alligator infested pond or using a smooth metal pole so that Gray Squirrel cannot climb up to the bird feeder. Gray Squirrel continues to outsmart Professor Flugel and always leaves a kind note requesting more birdseed the next morning. Finally, Professor Flugel leaves a note for Gray Squirrel asking him to breakfast. Gray Squirrel kindly accepts and never steals the birdseed from Professor Flugel's bird feeder again. Richly illustrated in bright colors, the illustrations are fun and attractive, while the repetitive prose will appeal to young children and beginning readers. Professor Flugel's and Gray Squirrel's interactions are fun to watch, and the problem-solving skills that both characters illustrate will help children learn how to handle confrontations and frustrating situations. 2004, Marshall Cavendish, Ages 3 to 7.
—Danielle Williams
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-In this repetitive story about compromise, an Einsteinian-looking professor matches his dim wit with a squirrel with human eyes and a goofy grin. Proud of the bird feeder that he has designed and built, the man is upset when his furry adversary consumes all of the seeds and then holds up a sign making a request for breakfast the following day. The frustrated professor tries various methods to keep the persistent creature away from the bird feeder: a bazookalike water gun, a gator in a moat, and a difficult-to-climb pole. However, the animal responds by donning a raincoat, feeding the predator, and flying over to the feeder in a hot-air balloon, each time thwarting the professor's escalating aggression. The two finally find peace when the man serves the squirrel breakfast in his kitchen. Done in gouache, the colorful paintings have a folk-art quality. Although they are filled with action, they are nevertheless stiff. Children may find the antics somewhat humorous and pick up on the illustrator's prescient hints for the man's "brilliant" ideas but the cartoon characters are more cloying than clever.-John Sigwald, Unger Memorial Library, Plainview, TX Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780761451679
Publisher:
Cavendish, Marshall Corporation
Publication date:
09/15/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.20(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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