Shooter [NOOK Book]

Overview

Cameron: "Deep inside, you know that whoever gets up in your face gets there because he knows you′re nothing, and he knows that you know it too."

Carla: "What I′m trying to do is to get by -- not even get over, just get by."

Leonard: "I have bought a gaw-juss weapon. It lies beneath my bed like a secret lover, quiet, powerful, waiting to ...

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Shooter

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Overview

Cameron: "Deep inside, you know that whoever gets up in your face gets there because he knows you′re nothing, and he knows that you know it too."

Carla: "What I′m trying to do is to get by -- not even get over, just get by."

Leonard: "I have bought a gaw-juss weapon. It lies beneath my bed like a secret lover, quiet, powerful, waiting to work my magic."

Statement of Fact: 17-year-old white male found dead in the aftermath of a shooting incident at Madison High School in Harrison County.

Conclusion: Death by self-inflicted wound.

Ages 12+

Written in the form of interviews, reports, and journal entries, the story of three troubled teenagers ends in a tragic school shooting.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
"In this chilling cautionary tale, Myers revisits the themes of his Monster and Scorpions in a slightly more detached structure, but the outcome is every bit as moving," wrote PW in a starred review. Ages 14-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
KLIATT
To quote the review of the hardcover in KLIATT, May 2004: The acclaimed author of Monster and many other books for YAs turns his attention to a school shooting in this disturbing look at how such a terrible event can come to pass. The novel, a collage of sorts, begins with an interview with Cameron, a 17-year-old African American student whose role in the shooting is not immediately clear. What does emerge is a portrait of an outsider, a bright but lonely boy who is befriended by Len, a white boy full of hate and anger. Len teaches Cameron to shoot and involves him in vandalizing a church. Both boys are bullied at school by jocks, but the authorities overlook it. Through more interviews, school, police, and newspaper reports, and finally Len's handwritten journal, we piece together the tragedy and the roles of each player, and understand how it came to pass. As in Todd Strasser's Give a Boy a Gun, Myers' use of multiple viewpoints to tell the story of a school shooting gives it an impact beyond that supplied by just one perspective. Issues of racism, bullying, family dynamics, and the nature of friendship all play a role as Cameron, an articulate teenager, struggles to make sense of his participation. A sobering look at how such tragedies develop, and the kind of personalities involved. KLIATT Codes: JS—Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2004, HarperTempest, Amistad, 223p., Ages 12 to 18.
—Paula Rohrlick
VOYA
Psychologists, an FBI investigator, and a county sheriff interview seventeen-year-old seniors Cameron Porter and Carla Evans for a threat analysis report regarding the high school shooting that resulted in multiple injuries, murder, and the suicide of their friend, Leonardo Gray. Reports and newspaper clips add perspective—or demonstrate the lack of it. Piece by piece, a façade is torn away and the truth comes to life—a painful, horrifying, chilling truth. The events portrayed on that tragic April day are simply a culmination of the stark, gripping reality that was the life of the shooting catalyst, Leonardo Gray. Through journal entries that comprise the last half of the book (printed in a typeface to resemble Leonardo's "own" scrawled printing), Len discloses his brilliant, confused, sad, and disturbed self, drawn into the spell of guns via the influence of his father, who abuses his mother. He craves revenge against a hotshot jock who bullies him. He wants love and friendship but misses the mark in his relationships. He is drawn to literature, especially the Bible, but twists words and undermines teachings. He cries out in an exceptionally poetic and sensitive voice in contrast to the whisper of scurrying rats in his head that lead him to choose death in an attempt to "create the real me." This novel is a powerful, intriguing, and imaginative fictional exposé of a teen crying out for emotional and mental relief. It draws the reader in with its unique format, reminiscent of Myers's Monster (HarperCollins, 1999/VOYA August 1999), and its unfortunately recognizable setting of high school violence, leaving a wake of unsettling emotions. Fans of Todd Strasser's thought-provokingGive a Boy a Gun (Simon & Schuster, 2000/VOYA October 2000) will clamor for this book. VOYA Codes 5Q 4P J S (Hard to imagine it being any better written; Broad general YA appeal; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2004, HarperCollins, 240p., and PLB Ages 12 to 18.
—Diane Tuccillo
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-Six months after a deadly shooting at a suburban high school, educators and psychological and criminal experts compile their interviews and analyses to assess any ongoing threat in the school environment. Through these documents, Myers skillfully tells the story of the shooting, its precipitating causes, and the aftermath for the shooter's closest friends. As in Robert Cormier's The Rag and Bone Shop (Delacorte, 2001), readers are made aware of the realistic and insidious biases different interrogators bring to their investigations. Seventeen-year-old Cameron Porter, the deceased shooter's closest friend, expresses himself one way when being debriefed by a psychologist and necessarily comes across differently when questioned by an FBI agent. Readers also are shown how such diverse types of inquiry are committed to paper with subtle but telling differences, as one interviewer asks that the transcriber retain Porter's pauses while the other directs the transcriber specifically to omit them. Other characters include the boys' one female friend, and, ultimately, Len, the shooter himself, through the clearly disturbed pages of his diary in the months leading up to the "incident." Myers uses no narrative frame other than the documents themselves and excels in providing clear and distinct voices through these interviews, notes, and reports; only the newspaper items lack a genuine ring. In addition to young adults who will find this story intensely readable as well as intense, adults working with teens should read and discuss the questions and implications that the tale reveals.-Francisca Goldsmith, Berkeley Public Library, CA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
When a shooting occurs at Madison High with two students killed and six injured, investigators try to get to the heart of the tragedy in hopes of preventing further occurrences. Absent or abusive parents, bullies at school, students feeling like powerless outsiders, access to guns, and a troubled student who's a "ticking bomb" waiting to go off seem to form the deadly combination, but is this after-the-fact analysis likely to help prevent future shootings? Told through transcripts of interviews, official reports, newspaper articles, Miranda warnings, and a handwritten journal, the story has the feel of an official report and about as much drama. The hodgepodge of documents and the dense print create a heaviness to the work, and readers may not have the patience to sift for the nuggets of insight the reports contain. Though the volume is not as effective in its innovative format as Myers's Monster (1999), the subject matter, as current as today's headlines, will attract readers. (Fiction. YA)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061975073
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/6/2009
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 238,786
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years
  • File size: 596 KB

Meet the Author

Five-time Coretta Scott King Award winner Walter Dean Myers was the acclaimed author of a wide variety of nonfiction and fiction for young people. His nonfiction includes We Are America: A Tribute from the Heart; Now Is Your Time!: The African-American Struggle for Freedom; I've Seen the Promised Land: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; Ida B. Wells: Let the Truth Be Told; Malcolm X: A Fire Burning Brightly; and Patrol: An American Soldier in Vietnam, a Jane Addams Children's Book Award winner. His illustrious list of young adult novels includes Darius & Twig; All the Right Stuff; Lockdown; Dope Sick; Autobiography of My Dead Brother; the New York Times bestseller Monster, which was the first winner of the Michael L. Printz Award; and many more. He was the 2012-2013 National Ambassador for Young People's Literature and an inaugural NYC Literary Honoree.

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Read an Excerpt

Shooter

Harrison County School Safety Committee
Threat Analysis Report

Submitted by:

Dr. Jonathan Margolies
Superintendent, Harrison County Board of Education

Dr. Richard Ewings
Senior County Psychologist

Special Agent Victoria Lash
F.B.I. Threat Assessment Analyst

Dr. Franklyn Bonner
Spectrum Group

Sheriff William Beach Mosley
Harrison County Criminal Bureau

Mission Statement


The Harrison County School Safety Committee, headed by Dr. Jonathan Margolies, is to investigate public school safety using interviews and all available records, with particular emphasis on the tragic events of last April; and to analyze and assess all pos-sible threats and dangers within the County's school community; and to report to the Governor of this State any findings consistent with imminent or possible threats to:

  • Any student or group of students
  • Any educator or administrator
  • Any other person
  • Any structure or building


It is understood by the members of the Safety Committee that the generated report will not carry a prima facie legal obligation but that it might be used in some legal capacity, and that all inter-viewees must be informed of their Miranda rights.

Madison High School Incident Analysis Report I -- Interview with Cameron Porter
Submitted by Dr. Richard Ewings,
Senior County Psychologist



Cameron Porter is a seventeen-year-old African American youth who attended Madison High School in HarrisonCounty. His grades ran in the high eighties and there is no indication, in his school records, of difficulty in social adjustment. He lives in a two-parent household and is the only child. The parental income is quite high, and there is no indication of deprivation.

Cameron has been advised that the interviews will not be privileged and that they can be subpoenaed for any subsequent legal action, but that the primary aim of the interviews is for analytical purposes. He has agreed to be interviewed in an effort to cooperate with the Analysis team and has signed a waiver to that effect.

He appeared at my office punctually, accompanied by his mother, who then left for another appointment. Cameron is a good-looking young man, neatly dressed, of medium to dark complexion. He seems reasonably comfortable and no more nervous than would be expected under the circumstances. A letter informing Cameron of his Miranda rights was drafted, signed by him, and put on file.

The initial taped interview began at 10:30 on the morning of October 24. This was six months after the incident at the high school.

Notes to transcriber:

  • Please return all tapes to my office as soon as possible.
  • Please indicate significant pauses or other voicings in the unedited draft of this report.


Dr. Richard Ewings

Richard Ewings: Good morning.

Cameron Porter: Good morning.

RE: Do you mind if I call you Cameron?

CP: Fine.

RE: Cameron, can we begin by you telling me something about yourself? Where do you live? Who do you live with? That sort of thing?

CP: Sure. I live over on Jewett Avenue. I live with my mom, Elizabeth, and my father.

RE: Can you give me your father's name and tell me what sort of work your parents do?

CP: My father's name is Norman. He does quality control for Dyna-Rod Industries. They manufacture heavy equipment, and they lease it to building contractors. What he does is travel around and check out how the leasing end of their business works. My mother works for an office-supply company.

RE: What would heavy equipment consist of?

CP: Cranes, derricks, specialized vehicles.

RE: How would you describe how you get along with your parents?

CP: Okay. Just normal I guess.

RE: Do you go out with them much? Are there family conversations, say, around the dinner table?

CP: My father travels a lot. He's away about a week and a half every month. Maybe more, I don't know. We sort of -- I wouldn't say that we talk a lot. I wouldn't say that we don't talk a lot, either. We go out -- we used to go out to eat once a month. Arturo's. You know where that is?

RE: About a mile off 95, isn't it?

CP: Down from the mall.

RE: Right. That's a nice place. Good Italian food. Do you enjoy eating there?

CP: It's okay. No big deal. They like it.

RE: What kinds of things do you talk about at Arturo's? Actually, what kinds of things do you enjoy talking about with your parents?

CP: I guess we don't really talk that much. When we do talk -- usually it's about something -- maybe about their jobs or something. They talk about their jobs a lot. They're trying to -- they have these goals they work on. You know, what they want to accomplish every year, that sort of thing.

RE: What do you think of their goals?

CP: Their goals? They're okay. They have things they want to do. Financial security -- that sort of thing. They're, like, doing the right things.

RE: When you say they're doing the right things, do you mean that you think they're doing the right things?

CP: Yeah. Yes, I guess so.

RE: How would you describe your relationship with your parents? Can you tell me how you think you get along with them, perhaps if there were different things you would have liked to have done with them than you were doing?

CP: They asked me that at the county office.

RE: And what did you say?

Shooter. Copyright © by Walter Myers. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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First Chapter

Shooter

Harrison County School Safety Committee
Threat Analysis Report

Submitted by:

Dr. Jonathan Margolies
Superintendent, Harrison County Board of Education

Dr. Richard Ewings
Senior County Psychologist

Special Agent Victoria Lash
F.B.I. Threat Assessment Analyst

Dr. Franklyn Bonner
Spectrum Group

Sheriff William Beach Mosley
Harrison County Criminal Bureau

Mission Statement


The Harrison County School Safety Committee, headed by Dr. Jonathan Margolies, is to investigate public school safety using interviews and all available records, with particular emphasis on the tragic events of last April; and to analyze and assess all pos-sible threats and dangers within the County's school community; and to report to the Governor of this State any findings consistent with imminent or possible threats to:

  • Any student or group of students
  • Any educator or administrator
  • Any other person
  • Any structure or building


It is understood by the members of the Safety Committee that the generated report will not carry a prima facie legal obligation but that it might be used in some legal capacity, and that all inter-viewees must be informed of their Miranda rights.

Madison High School Incident Analysis Report I -- Interview with Cameron Porter
Submitted by Dr. Richard Ewings,
Senior County Psychologist



Cameron Porter is a seventeen-year-old African American youth who attended Madison High School in Harrison County. His grades ran in the high eighties and there is no indication, in his school records, of difficulty in social adjustment. He lives in a two-parent household and is the only child. The parental income is quite high, and there is no indication of deprivation.

Cameron has been advised that the interviews will not be privileged and that they can be subpoenaed for any subsequent legal action, but that the primary aim of the interviews is for analytical purposes. He has agreed to be interviewed in an effort to cooperate with the Analysis team and has signed a waiver to that effect.

He appeared at my office punctually, accompanied by his mother, who then left for another appointment. Cameron is a good-looking young man, neatly dressed, of medium to dark complexion. He seems reasonably comfortable and no more nervous than would be expected under the circumstances. A letter informing Cameron of his Miranda rights was drafted, signed by him, and put on file.

The initial taped interview began at 10:30 on the morning of October 24. This was six months after the incident at the high school.

Notes to transcriber:

  • Please return all tapes to my office as soon as possible.
  • Please indicate significant pauses or other voicings in the unedited draft of this report.


Dr. Richard Ewings

Richard Ewings: Good morning.

Cameron Porter: Good morning.

Do you mind if I call you Cameron?

Fine.

Cameron, can we begin by you telling me something about yourself? Where do you live? Who do you live with? That sort of thing?

Sure. I live over on Jewett Avenue. I live with my mom, Elizabeth, and my father.

Can you give me your father's name and tell me what sort of work your parents do?

My father's name is Norman. He does quality control for Dyna-Rod Industries. They manufacture heavy equipment, and they lease it to building contractors. What he does is travel around and check out how the leasing end of their business works. My mother works for an office-supply company.

What would heavy equipment consist of?

Cranes, derricks, specialized vehicles.

How would you describe how you get along with your parents?

Okay. Just normal I guess.

Do you go out with them much? Are there family conversations, say, around the dinner table?

My father travels a lot. He's away about a week and a half every month. Maybe more, I don't know. We sort of -- I wouldn't say that we talk a lot. I wouldn't say that we don't talk a lot, either. We go out -- we used to go out to eat once a month. Arturo's. You know where that is?

About a mile off 95, isn't it?

Down from the mall.

Right. That's a nice place. Good Italian food. Do you enjoy eating there?

It's okay. No big deal. They like it.

What kinds of things do you talk about at Arturo's? Actually, what kinds of things do you enjoy talking about with your parents?

I guess we don't really talk that much. When we do talk -- usually it's about something -- maybe about their jobs or something. They talk about their jobs a lot. They're trying to -- they have these goals they work on. You know, what they want to accomplish every year, that sort of thing.

What do you think of their goals?

Their goals? They're okay. They have things they want to do. Financial security -- that sort of thing. They're, like, doing the right things.

When you say they're doing the right things, do you mean that you think they're doing the right things?

Yeah. Yes, I guess so.

How would you describe your relationship with your parents? Can you tell me how you think you get along with them, perhaps if there were different things you would have liked to have done with them than you were doing?

They asked me that at the county office.

And what did you say?

Shooter. Copyright © by Walter Myers. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Reading Group Guide

Shooter
By Walter Dean Myers

About the Book:

Seventeen-year-old Cameron Porter is interviewed by the president of the County Board of Education, a county psychologist, an FBI Threat Assessment analyst, a Threat Assessment specialist, and the county sheriff as to his involvement in a shooting in which a student was killed and others were injured. Cameron, a shy, intelligent African American young man, was with the sniper, Len, an angry, slightly built Anglo teen. The book is comprised of Cameron's interview transcripts and Len's handwritten journal entries leading up to the shooting. Cameron and Len clearly have different ways of responding to the bullying at school and to stress at home. Cameron's wealthy, career-driven father has high expectations and pushes Cameron to become more aggressive. Len's abusive father takes out his problems at work on his family. In response, Cameron becomes even quieter, and Len gets even angrier. Len fights back, taking Cameron along for the ride, starting out by defacing a church and target practicing in the woods. Then he lures Cameron and their friend, Carla, to the high school with paint cans in hand. But they soon discover that Len is armed with guns rather than brushes. This isn't going to be a graffiti spree; it's going to be a shooting spree.

Awards for Walter Dean Myers's work:

Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults ALA Award for outstanding contribution to young adult literature See back page for awards listed by title.

Discussion Questions:

  1. The psychologist asks Cameron what type of music he listens to, and Cameron says he isn't "into any Fourth Reich number" (p. 11). Do you think that the music people listen to affects how others react to them?
  2. At the shooting range, there is a target with Martin Luther King Jr. holding a gun, which immediately gets shot down. Upset, Cameron tells his father about it and is told to stay focused and not "go off on some civil-rights kick" (p. 20). How would you have responded to the situation at the range and/or with Cameron's father?
  3. After vandalizing the church, Len goes to the parish house and reports that he has "heard noises from the church, that maybe one of the prophets was calling out for help" (p. 28). Later, when the police call to ask what he has heard, Len gives himself up. Does Len want to get caught?
  4. Cameron refers to the jocks, their girlfriends, and the teachers as having power. For example, the guy behind you, who keeps kicking your chair but makes you afraid to do anything about it, has power over you (p. 34). Do you agree with Cameron's assessment of the power holders in a typical high school?
  5. Len is self-conscious about his body. Wearing black emphasizes his thinness, but he does it to show that he has "gone dark" and does not want to get along with people (p. 45). Is his behavior a self-defense mechanism? Is he declaring himself an outsider before anyone else can? Have you ever done something similar?
  6. While being interviewed by the FBI agent, Cameron refers to the shooting as "the incident." The incredulous agent asks, "You're referring to murder as an 'incident' " (p. 58)? Why do people replace harsh terms such as "murder" and "dead" with neutral terms such as "incident" and "passed away"?
  7. Carla is described as having streaks of blue in her hair and ears pierced in several spots, and wearing heavy makeup and multicolored lipstick. Do you agree with the interviewer that "her physical presentation is one of 'rebellion' " (p. 88)?
  8. In history class the students write essays imagining themselves as a historical figure. Len writes in his journal that he is "Quasimodo turned inside out with my lips too red and legs too short and my hump slung across my back" (p. 157). Why does Len pick Quasimodo? Whom would you pick for Cameron and Carla?
  9. Len writes that he "got into it with Drab Brad, the beastie buoy in the sea of strife" (p. 158). Are there other examples of Len's sarcastic wordplay in his journal?
  10. Frustrated with his father's aggression toward him, Cameron agrees to join Len in vandalizing the school. Len is ecstatic but still worried. He writes, "Can I trust them to go all the way? Can I take them?" (p. 222) To whom does he refer? Where does Len want to take them?

About the Author

Walter Dean Myers is the author of over seventy books for young people. During his writing career of over thirty years, he has received virtually every accolade his profession offers, including the Michael L. Printz Award for Monster, a Newbery Honor for Scorpions, numerous Coretta Scott King citations, and the American Library Association's Margaret A. Edwards Award for his lifetime contribution to the field of children's literature.

Born in West Virginia and raised by foster parents in Harlem, New York, where many of his books are set, Mr. Myers now lives with his family in Jersey City, New Jersey. Walter Dean Myers says of his work, "Ultimately, what I want to do with my writing is to make connections -- to touch the lives of my characters and, through them, those of my readers."

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 50 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(16)

4 Star

(20)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(4)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    $hooter

    I am 16 years old and I'm a sophomore at Holt. I recently finished reading Shooter by Walter Dean Myers. I read this book as a free reading book for English class, and a few of my other friends in the class read the book also. I chose to read Shooter because the cover of the book got my attention because it had a bullet hole on it and also because I've read a few other Walter Dean Myers books before and they were good overall.

    In the book, Cameron, the main character, is friends with Len and Carla. The three of them are basically outcasts and don't really fit in with many other people. They like shooting guns for fun. It's exciting to them. They all go to this range sometimes and shoot together. Len and Cameron get pushed around at school a lot. Len is the type of guy that doesn't take crap from people, but Cameron just lets things go on and doesn't do anything.

    When the three of them all encounter problems in their life at home and at school, they rely on each other for support. Len becomes very radical in his efforts to stop violence in the world and he starts acting very dark. Throughout the book, Cameron and Carla are interviewed about their lives and how they got caught up in more problems with Len. As the book goes on, things really start heating up and things go haywire. Events take place that are detrimental to the three of their lives.

    A key theme in the book is friendship because when things in Cameron, Len, and Carla's lives go wrong, they turn to their friends. I guess this book is a good in bringing up who your real friends are.

    If you enjoy reading other Walter Dean Myers books, you will enjoy reading Shooter because it will keep you guessing what happens next and make you keep turning the pages.

    Overall, I would rate this book a 3 out of 5 starts. It's got a very good plot, but after a while the book gets a little old because the majority of the book is talking and interviews of what already took place. Even though they book is a little boring at parts, it was still a great book that anyone can enjoy.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2008

    weird, but good

    This book was very weird in a way because you got to go into the mind of the murderer himself. Just knowing what was going threw his head makes you shiver in your seat. I would recommend this book. Very interesting.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2008

    WOOOOOOOOH!!

    'Shooter' is an amazing book. The interviews really gave me an idea about what was going on in their head. Len is a strange character, but I'm sure many teenagers can relate to him in some sort of way. I really liked how Meyers let you know about almost every little detail, and made it seem like you were in the school with the kids that day. The book overwhelmed me with emotion, and I felt the sorrow and hurt the friends and family all felt after the incident.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2008

    This outlandish book is like none you have/will ever read in your life

    Cameron Goode, Timber Creek High School, Class of 2008 This dynamic story is of Cameron Porter, and his analyzed character after the suicide/mass homicide committed by his best friend. This story leaps onward into the mind of a teenager, who orchestrated a school shooting, and into the mentality of his best friend, who as bloodcurdling as it may be has an identical thought process. This is a riveting book I recommend for anybody over the age of 16 or anybody who would be able to grasp the complexities, or the significance of the story¿s conclusion. This is a must read for anybody interested in the field of psychology, or anybody who is intrigued by the human mind.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    A Dark Thriller

    I am a sophomore at Holt High School and I read the book Shooter as a free-read in my English class. This book was recommended to me by my school librarian as she said I was likely to enjoy it, and I most definitely did.

    Shooter was written by Walter Dean Myers. Myers tells the story of seventeen year-old Cameron Porter and his interactions with his best friends Leonard Gray and Carla Evans. The book consists of various interviews between Cameron and Carla and multiple detectives, doctors, and writers. In fact, each chapter of the book is a different interview. During these interviews, the investigators are trying to figure out what caused Leonard to commit a horrible crime. They find out a plethora of facts including his father owning a gun club, him going "black" (going black was the term given in the book for dressing in all black clothes and wearing dark make-up), and Leonard's isolation from the "real" of life. It is these factors that eventually drive Leonard to threatening to bring a gun to school and shooting his peers. It was up to Cameron and Carla to do something or to just sit by and let it happen. They were forced to decide between being good friends and doing what is right.

    The book Shooter provokes a variety of themes and questions to the reader. The main theme is the split between friendship and doing what is right. Other themes include isolation from "realness," friendship, and responsibilities. The book also brings up some real-life questions while reading. At various points throughout the book I would find myself asking, "What would I have done if I were Cameron, and I had to decide whether or not to betray my best friend?" It is interesting to put yourself into the plot and see what you would have done.

    Overall, I would give Walter Dean Myers' Shooter a 4 out of 5. The reason why it's not quite a 5 is because the entire plot is told in past tense so at times it is difficult to understand. Also, some of the interviews seem to be too lengthy and seem to drag on. It is for that reason that I would recommend this book to people who are in either high school or college. It is a somewhat challenging read if you can't stand long periods of reading so it would not be a good read for younger students. I would also recommend it to people who enjoy war novels or action books. This book reminds me of Fallen Angels, which was also written by Myers, so if you enjoyed that book, pick up Shooter.

    So, if you can get over the fact that the book takes a lot of concentration and long periods of reading to understand the plot, then start reading Shooter today; I would highly recommend this book for any intermediate to high level reader.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2008

    Great, then horrible

    This book started out strong, then became an extreme disappointment. It really showed how a book can tank at the end. The book was not the style it was said to be. Though there were moments in the beginging it ended up to be a sheer disappointment.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2008

    It was ok.

    This book in my mind was boring. I like how it's told through interviews but a lot of the stuff they talked about wasn't needed. There wasn't an obvious plot or anything so it seemed like they were rambling on.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2012

    Me

    I thought the book was really interesting but i thought it would have been better if it was told through either of the boys perspetive rather it being a whole bunch of people telling their side

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2012

    By the sound of the desription, some one commited suicide? I couldn't tell.

    I read the description, but then some one said it was MURDER. I love murder mysterys, but this iss confusing. And no, i cant just get the book. Five stars i guess.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 12, 2012

    Are you kidding me?

    This book was ridiculous. After reading it, i realize why there has not been any reviews since december. Most people were either too astonished by how horrible and slow this book was, or died of boredom before they could even finish it. Yes, Shooter, was a very powerful story, yes, it had a great plot, and yes, it had a wonderful introduction to the characters, but none of this makes up for how slow and boring this book was. I think most of the problem with this book is that it was written in an interview forum, when it should have been written in story form when the event happened. Anyways, i was not impressed at all and wish the author would have taken more time planning this book, once again i think this book could have had great potential, if only the author would take a little bit more time on it.i

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 30, 2011

    Shooter, A depressing book

    Dont read this book if your looking gor a bright moment ijn your life. I was forced to read it and it made me angry at how violent it was.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    shu shu shu shooter

    I'm 16 years old. I'm a sophomore at Holt High School. I recently just read the book Shooter by Walter Dean Myers. I read this book for my own reading book for English class and a few other of my classmates in the class read it also. This book looked good sitting on the shelf and caught my eye and that's the reason I chose it.
    The main character in the book is Cameron. His best friend Len gets into a lot of trouble and tries to stop violence. He also gets their other friend Carla involved in most of the things they do. Carla is the one that Len and Cameron fight over and/or like as more then a friend. The three of them don't fit in at their school or really anywhere and are outcast. All three of them stick together no matter what happens and they all have problems in their life and at school.
    Some of the themes in this book are showing who your true friends are, picking friends wisely, enjoying life and stopping the violence. All of these themes are all throughout the book.
    The whole book is interviews and questionings about what happens at the end of the book. If you like this book, you may like the TV show 60 Minutes. They both interview people about cases and mysteries that have happened. People that like putting things together and listening to cases and short stories would like this book. People that wouldn't like this book are people who like long stories and people who don't like books that don't tell a story.
    Overall I would give this book a 3 out of 5. The book is interesting and kind of cool to read. I just thought that the story could have been told with more details and a little longer.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    School Shooting

    I am a sophomore at Holt Public Schools, and I just finished reading the book Shooter by Walter Dean Myers. I picked up Shooter as an independent reading book in my school library. The cover of the book inspired me to read it, but also the title. Shooter sounds like an intense name and made me wonder what the book would be about.

    In the book, Cameron and Carla are being interviewed about a crime their friend has committed. It is up to them to tell the police what really happened that day at the school. Cameron and Carla are at the wrong place at the wrong time.

    Friendship is a main theme in Shooter. But, this book brings up the thought, who really are your true friends? And in the end, Cameron and Carla have a really tough decision.

    Cameron, the main character, is a friend of Len, and they both are friends with a girl named Carla. All three of them are what you could call outcasts of their school. Being friends, they all would go out to a gun range and shoot guns for fun.

    Len is a black kid who never really fit in with the jocks or popular people. So, he is bullied a lot of the time, but he doesn't like to take crap from other people. Len gets very angry and sometimes he does dangerous and illegal things. All of these add up to one final, life-changing event.

    Anyone that enjoys a mystery may be interested in reading Shooter. It always makes you want to know what happens to everyone in the book. You just want to keep reading until the end.

    Overall, I would rate this book a three out of a five. This is a good book, but after a while it kind of gets boring because the majority of the book is an interview. I think that it would be a whole lot better if it were a story of the time when the event happened. Reading an interview for a whole book just gets old, even though it tells you what happened, just not in an interesting way.

    Another book recommended to read is Fallen Angels, also by Walter Dean Myers. Both of these books are full of action.

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  • Posted December 7, 2008

    Shooter by: Callie Christopherson

    The tone of this book is depressing. This is a story in high school that something serious happens and they interview two students whose names are, Cameron and Carla. These interviews though were taken a year and half later than the incident did. This tragedy is discovered through the whole entire book. Keeps your nose in the book. Cameron was interviewed because it was one of his friends that got shot at Madison High school in Harrison County. Through the whole interview they find out that Cameron and Carla were a part of the school incident. This is a book about kids and students commiting crimes. This book is like a journal or diary. The way they read from letters or things from the diary makes it seem real life. This book teaches kids reading this book about gangs and how picking on other kids and what it can lead to. For this kid, it was death, others it¿s just humiliation. It makes you wonder why people bully other kids. Maybe it makes themselves feel better about themselves and boosts their confidence. Cameron was a really good student in school and his grades were in the high eighties. He lives with his mom and dad and he is the only child. The interview was a year and 6 months later. Shooter is a story that reveals the heartache of students that have to deal with tragedies at the school. It shows how dramatic how the bullying can lead to the worst and how it should teach everyone about this. Through the interviews we learn to understand more about the story and about what happened. This is a tragic story and makes me remember Leif Brittian who went to our school and who was mugged and shot and was a tragedy at our school. So when I read this book, it was kind of hard for me.

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  • Posted December 5, 2008

    Shooter - 7th

    It is easy to see how well Walter Dean Myers writes when you glance into this beautifully written novel. Unlike other people, directors and authors for example, this book is taken from a murderer's perspective, which makes it easy to see into the head of someone that is thinking of committing an act with such a violent result. Although there are no pictures in this book, Myers paints them perfectly using your head and imagination as his canvas. Step by step, this book becomes more and more suspenseful, and much like a movie, keeps you on the edge of whatever it is you are sitting on while tearing through this book page by page and chapter by chapter. The book is not just told through pages, but documents, notes, interviews, newspaper articles, etc. Len, the troubled student who may be on his way to something worth regretting, shares his times with his best friends, Carla and Cameron who are the only people keeping Len anywhere near the right track of life. Len being the unusual and vivid character throughout the book, is not the only one to share his life. Myers minipulates the book into telling secrets about Carla and Cameron as well. You soon find out that Len was not the only person going through troubles and problems.<BR/><BR/>The book shows towards the end what all Len was going through as Myers enters you into the pages of Len's journal. Stories continue to fill your imagination with pictures of Len's idea of life and how he felt about the world around him. This book will open your eyes in many ways, and make you feel as if you are running this race called life with Carla, Cameron, and Len. These problems that the characters are faced with feel like they have become your own problems. This book is very alive and brings you into a whole new world you never thought that you would want to enter. A student's criminal mind, caught up in a world that seems to hate him.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Review for Shooter- period 5

    Almost two weeks ago I found this book in my own house. As my eyes scanned each row of books on my ratty bookshelf I came upon a book named Shooter. I guess this will do, I thought as I swiped off the pounds of dust accumulated over the amount of time I wouldn¿t want to know. I then read the back and was sure that it was good enough to be approved by my teacher, which it was. On the first day of our self-selected book project I sat down and began to read, and about a week later every word inside the hardback covers was read. Despite all the words in the dictionary, it only takes three to describe this novel; riveting, compelling,and fantastic. In the first ten pages of Shooter, the reader discovers that a tragic event has occurred. However, Walter Dean Myers feeds the reader information by teaspoon, making the story more suspenseful and compelling. Also, instead of using the normal, and boring, narrative writing he uses documents, interviews, transcripts, newspaper articles, and journal entries to put together the plot piece by piece. Even though Len, the mastermind behind the school shooting that occurs, is the main focus of the story, he isn¿t the one to tell it. Cameron Porter and Carla Evans are Len¿s only close friends and sanity from the world which he hid himself from. In numerous interviews they inform the professionals and also the reader about the events that led up to the shooting and about their close friend Len. But Myers makes them reveal a few problems of their own.Len to me was a very interesting yet corrupt character. However throughout the book I¿ve thought to much about his bad side and want to discuss what he really has to offer. After reading the book I was upset about his death because to me he showed great potential, all he needed was guidance. Towards the end of Shooter there is his journal. I was so impressed by his creativity and his deep, and sometimes insightful, thoughts about life and the world around us. Even though he is a fictional character, I wish he had another chance. With such a controversial topic I think Myers did a great job of getting his point across. He provides such good insight about incidents such as the one in the story, and that they can be stopped. Overall, all I can say that it was a great book. It has a strange and ominous mood but the complexities of the plot encourage you to read further. I now know why my teacher and sister insisted for me to read this novel, and I¿m so glad they did.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2007

    The most interesting book I've ever read.

    I chose this book for a book report. It ended up being more than that. I read through it in 2 days and I wanted more. It was like going on vacation. You go, you love it, and its over just like that but you want it to be your life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2007

    'Mysterious Shooter Needs to be Found'

    There is much action taking place right in the beginning of the book, Shooter. Cameron Porter, a kid who goes to an average high school and is like most normal students, is being interviewed by a psychologist about his friend, Leonard Gray. Cameron was telling this high professional about the personality, thoughts, and views of his friend Leonard. The only reason why Cameron is interviewed is that there was a serious shooting that went on at school. The police are wondering if Cameron or Leonard, who was dead with Brad Williams at the scene, was the shooter of this incident. However, there was another important person named, Carla Evans, who was a part of the shooting that happened at the school. She was also interviewed by a psychologist to discuss her relationship with Leonard and Cameron. Farther into the book, these two friends of Leonard describe what there life was like and what they thought about Leonard and their relationship with him. In order to find out who was the shooter that killed both Leonard and Brad in this mysterious crime case, you will have to read the book yourself. There were many things that I liked and disliked in the book, Shooter. There was a bunch of narrating that took place between the characters in the book. This was difficult to follow at some points, but it was enjoyable to have different views of each character in the novel. The author, Walter Dean Myers, used a variety of words that each certain character used as there form of language to speak with. This made the book flow smooth and simple in dialogue between the characters in the scene. Shooter, best relates to the show CSI on television because it has the same type of plot that the show follows. There was also some dislikes that occurred after I read the book. One dislike was the repetition of words or sentences in the book which made it dull and boring at some points. There was also some difficult words that I came across which made certain scenes confusing and difficult to understand. Even though there are some dislikes that I came across, I would still rate this book a four out of five for its excitement and its intenseness that the plot gives to the reader. This book includes some other details that a reader may want to know in order to comprehend and understand the book. If any reader loves to be mysterious and detective like, this is the book for you to read. In the book, the characters give the information that is asked by the psychologists and this gives you the information to lead up to the crime of the unknown shooter of the school. I would highly recommend this book to the readers who love and admire Walter Dean Myers. He put a lot of his emotional thought and feelings into his novels or stories that he writes. Overall, this book gets the reader thinking and wondering what is going to happen next in each different scene. This book is exciting and enjoyable to read, and is very easy to comprehend to if you love an action type of novel.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2007

    Shooter

    Shooter is about two teenagers, different race who go to the same high school. They are Lend and Cameron they don¿t even know why they hang-out together or what they like about each other. What I liked from the book was that Len and Cameron got interviewed by different reporters because of the shooting that occurred in their school. Len and Cameron behave badly by vandalizing a church and writing on the school walls. The message I received from Shooter is, ¿Think before you act, the consequences may be worse than what you think, and think for yourself not in other people¿s point of view.¿ This book is good for teenagers to read because it includes teenage problems like school shootings, school fights, and bullying. Shooter is interesting anyone can read it adults too because it will remind them of their teenage years. Readers watch out because the book skips back and forth also at some parts you will be confused in who is who or who did what between Len and Cameron. Shooter is fiction but the events in the story can be non-fiction.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 7, 2007

    Shooter- a good book

    I liked this book Shooter because it gave you the different points of view of each of the main characters. It kind of made you feel like if you were in the book, because you¿ll be reading and clearly understanding every word in the book. I think the main point Walter Dean Myers tried to get trough in this book is that accidents and events can cause changes in life. What I didn¿t like about this book was that at first it was kind of hard to adjust, but overall I thought this book was pretty cool. I recommend it to anyone who has ever been curious about school shootings or just a book to read when you are bored.

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