The Shooting Star

The Shooting Star

4.0 2
by Hergé
     
 

The classic graphic novel. A meteorite collides with Earth! Tintin is part of the expedition to the Arctic Ocean to locate the fallen star. But they aren't the only ones hungry to make the new discovery-someone is trying to sabotage Tintin and his team!

Overview

The classic graphic novel. A meteorite collides with Earth! Tintin is part of the expedition to the Arctic Ocean to locate the fallen star. But they aren't the only ones hungry to make the new discovery-someone is trying to sabotage Tintin and his team!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780316358514
Publisher:
Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
05/30/1978
Series:
Adventures of Tintin: Original Classic Series
Pages:
62
Sales rank:
238,428
Product dimensions:
8.12(w) x 11.50(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
8 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Hergé, one of the most famous Belgians in the world, was a comics writer and artist. The internationally successful Adventures of Tintin are his most well-known and beloved works. They have been translated into 38 different languages and have inspired such legends as Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein. He wrote and illustrated for The Adventures of Tintin until his death in 1983.

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Shooting Star 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This story, as a whole, is rather lacklustre-it takes a while to get going, and even once these hurdles are overcome, lacks the flow and poetry associated with Herge. I think this is the only place where the master falls into the stereotype trap-his portrayal of the greasy financier Bohlwinkel who, although a parody of his line of work, could be misinterpreted as a nasty bit of anti-Semitism. The Captain, now an indispensible part of the team, doesn't appear until relatively late in the proceedings and is still very much underway (although his barrage of abuse at the phony ship company is priceless). The transition between dreams and reality is blurred to say the least, and plain weird at times (such as the mad prophet materialising in Tintin's lounge). There are some good comic moments, and the sequence with the scientists staggering out of the dining room is masterly, but the project overall seems to lack the spark and heart of a vintage Tintin.