The Shop on Blossom Street (Blossom Street Series #1)

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Overview

There's a little yarn store in Seattle.

It's owned by Lydia Hoffman, and it represents her dream of a new life free from cancer. A life that offers a chance at love…

Lydia teaches knitting to beginners, and the first class is "How to Make a Baby Blanket." Three women join. Jacqueline Donovan wants to knit something for her grandchild as a gesture of reconciliation with her daughter-in-law. Carol Girard feels that the baby blanket is a message ...

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2005 Mass-market paperback First edition. New. No dust jacket as issued. Mass market (rack) paperback. Glued binding. 416 p. Audience: General/trade. this is in brand new unused ... pristine condition perfect Read more Show Less

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Overview

There's a little yarn store in Seattle.

It's owned by Lydia Hoffman, and it represents her dream of a new life free from cancer. A life that offers a chance at love…

Lydia teaches knitting to beginners, and the first class is "How to Make a Baby Blanket." Three women join. Jacqueline Donovan wants to knit something for her grandchild as a gesture of reconciliation with her daughter-in-law. Carol Girard feels that the baby blanket is a message of hope as she makes a final attempt to conceive. And Alix Townsend is knitting her blanket for a court-ordered community service project.

These four very different women, brought together by an age-old craft, make unexpected discoveries—about themselves and each other. Discoveries that lead to friendship and more…

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
A Seattle knitting store brings together four very different women in this earnest tale about friendship and love. Lydia Hoffman, a two-time cancer survivor, opens the shop A Good Yarn as a symbol of the new life she plans to lead. She starts a weekly knitting class, hoping to improve business and make friends in the area. The initial class project is a baby blanket, and Macomber (Changing Habits), a knitter herself who offers tips about the craft and pithy observations from knitting professionals throughout the novel, includes the knitting pattern at the start of the book. Well-heeled Jacqueline Donovan, who chooses to ignore her empty marriage, disguises her disdain for her pregnant daughter-in-law by knitting a baby blanket. Carol Girard joins the group as an affirmation of her hopes to finally have a successful in vitro pregnancy. Alix Townsend, a high school dropout with an absentee father and a mother incarcerated for forging checks, uses the class to satisfy a court-ordered community service sentence for a drug-possession conviction for which her roommate is really responsible. Unfortunately, Macomber doesn't get much below the surface of her characters, and, although they all have interesting back stories, the arc of each individual happy ending is too predictable. The only surprise involves Alix's hapless, overweight roommate, Laurel, and even this smacks of plot-driven manipulation. Macomber is an adept storyteller overall, however, and many will be entertained by this well-paced story about four women finding happiness and fulfillment through their growing friendships. Agent, Irene Goodman. (May) Forecast: The religious overtones of Macomber's novel may throw some readers, but the author should attract her usual sizeable readership and pick up some fans of Chiaverini's Elm Creek Quilts series. Author tour. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
"Macomber is an adept storyteller.... Many will be entertained by this well-paced story about four women finding happiness and fulfillment through their growing friendship." -Publishers Weekly

"Four women brought together by their interest in knitting makes for an interesting read by bestselling novelist Debbie Macomber. . . . The Shop on Blossom Street shows the author's understanding of the heart of a woman." -The Sunday Oklahoman

"Macomber is a master storyteller; any one of these characters could have been a stereotype in less talented hands. Instead, these women and their stories are completely absorbing." -RT Book Reviews

"Debbie Macomber tells women's stories in a way no one else does." -BookPage

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780778321606
  • Publisher: Mira
  • Publication date: 5/28/2005
  • Series: Blossom Street Series , #1
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 6.62 (w) x 10.88 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Debbie Macomber

Debbie Macomber, with more than 100 million copies of her books sold worldwide, is one of today's most popular authors. The #1 New York Times bestselling author is best known for her ability to create compelling characters and bring their stories to life in her books. Debbie is a regular resident on numerous bestseller lists, including the New York Times (70 times and counting), USA TODAY (currently 67 times) and Publishers Weekly (47 times). Visit her at www.DebbieMacomber.com.

Biography

Publishing did not come easy to self-described "creative speller" Debbie Macomber. When Macomber decided to follow her dreams of becoming a bestselling novelist, she had a lot of obstacles in her path. For starters, Macomber is dyslexic. On top of this, she had only a high school degree, four young children at home, and absolutely no connections in the publishing world. If there's one thing you can say about Debbie Macomber, however, it is that she does not give up. She rented a typewriter and started writing, determined to break into the world of romance fiction.

The years went on and the rejection letters piled up. Her family was living on a shoestring budget, and Debbie was beginning to think that her dreams of being a novelist might never be fulfilled. She began writing for magazines to earn some extra money, and she eventually saved up enough to attend a romance writer's conference with three hundred other aspiring novelists. The organizers of the conference picked ten manuscripts to review in a group critique session. Debbie was thrilled to learn that her manuscript would be one of the novels discussed.

Her excitement quickly faded when an editor from Harlequin tore her manuscript to pieces in front of the crowded room, evoking peals of laughter from the assembled writers. Afterwards, Macomber approached the editor and asked her what she could do to improve her novel. "Throw it away," the editor suggested.

Many writers would have given up right then and there, but not Macomber. The deeply religious Macomber took a lesson from Job and gathered strength from adversity. She returned home and mailed one last manuscript to Silhouette, a publisher of romance novels. "It cost $10 to mail it off," Macomber told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in 2000. "My husband was out of work at this time, in Alaska, trying to find a job. The children and I were living on his $250-a-week unemployment, and I can't tell you what $10 was to us at that time."

It turned out to be the best $10 Macomber ever spent. In 1984, Silhouette published her novel, Heartsong. (Incidentally, although Heartsong was Macomber's first sale, she actually published another book, Starlight, before Heartsong went to print.) Heartsong went on to become the first romance novel to ever be reviewed in Publishers Weekly, and Macomber was finally on her way.

Today, Macomber is one of the most widely read authors in America. A regular on the New York Times bestseller charts, she is best known for her Cedar Cove novels, a heartwarming story sequence set in a small town in Washington state, and for her Knitting Books series, featuring a group of women who patronize a Seattle yarn store. In addition, her backlist of early romances, including several contemporary Westerns, has been reissued with great success.

Macomber has made a successful transition from conventional romance to the somewhat more flexible genre known as "women's fiction." "I was at a point in my life where I found it difficult to identify with a 25-year-old heroine," Macomber said in an interview with ContemporaryRomanceWriters.com. "I found that I wanted to write more about the friendships women share with each other." To judge from her avid, ever-increasing fan base, Debbie's readers heartily approve.

Good To Know

Some outtakes from our interview with Macomber:

"I'm dyslexic, although they didn't have a word for it when I was in grade school. The teachers said I had 'word blindness.' I've always been a creative speller and never achieved good grades in school. I graduated from high school but didn't have the opportunity to attend college, so I did what young women my age did at the time -- I married. I was a teenager, and Wayne and I (now married nearly 37 years) had four children in five years."

"I'm a yarnaholic. That means I have more yarn stashed away than any one person could possibly use in three or four lifetimes. There's something inspiring about yarn that makes me feel I could never have enough. Often I'll go into my yarn room (yes, room!) and just hold skeins of yarn and dream about projects. It's a comforting thing to do."

"My office walls are covered with autographs of famous writers -- it's what my children call my ‘dead author wall.' I have signatures from Mark Twain, Earnest Hemingway, Jack London, Harriett Beecher Stowe, Pearl Buck, Charles Dickens, Rudyard Kipling, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, to name a few."

"I'm morning person, and rip into the day with a half-mile swim (FYI: a half mile is a whole lot farther in the water than it is on land) at the local pool before I head into the office, arriving before eight. It takes me until nine or ten to read through all of the guest book entries from my web site and the mail before I go upstairs to the turret where I do my writing. Yes, I write in a turret -- is that romantic, or what? I started blogging last September and really enjoy sharing bits and pieces of my life with my readers. Once I'm home for the day, I cook dinner, trying out new recipes. Along with cooking, I also enjoy eating, especially when the meal is accompanied by a glass of good wine. Wayne and I take particular pleasure in sampling eastern Washington State wines (since we were both born and raised in that part of the state).

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    1. Hometown:
      Port Orchard, Washington
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 22, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Yakima, Washington
    1. Education:
      Graduated from high school in 1966; attended community college
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

"The yarn forms the stitches, the knitting forges the friendships, the craft links the generations."

—Karen Alfke, "Unpattern" designer and knitting instructor

LYDIA HOFFMAN

The first time I saw the empty store on Blossom Street I thought of my father. It reminded me so much of the bicycle shop he had when I was a kid. Even the large display windows, shaded by a colorful striped awning, were the same. Outside my dad's shop, there were flower boxes full of red blossoms—impatiens—that spilled over beneath the large windows. That was Mom's contribution: impatiens in the spring and summer, chrysanthemums in the fall and shiny green mistletoe at Christmas. I plan to have flowers, too.

Dad's business grew steadily and he moved into increasingly larger premises, but I always loved his first store best.

I must have astounded the rental agent who was showing me the property. She'd barely unlocked the front door when I announced, "I'll take it."

She turned to face me, her expression blank as if she wasn't sure she'd heard me correctly. "Wouldn't you like to see the place? You do realize there's a small apartment above the shop that comes with it, don't you?"

"Yes, you mentioned that earlier." The apartment worked perfectly for me. My cat, Whiskers, and I were in need of a home.

"You would like to see the place before you sign the papers, wouldn't you?" she persisted.

I smiled and nodded. But it wasn't really necessary; instinctively I knew this was the ideal location for my yarn shop. And for me.

The one drawback was that this Seattle neighborhood was undergoing extensive renovations and, because of the construction mess, Blossom Street was closed at one end, with only local traffic allowed. The brick building across the street, which had once been a three-story bank, was being transformed into high-end condos. Several other buildings, including an old warehouse, were also in the process of becoming condos. The architect had somehow managed to maintain the traditional feel of the original places, and that delighted me. Construction would continue for months, but it did mean that my rent was reasonable, at least for now.

I knew the first six months would be difficult. They are for any small business. The constant construction might create more obstacles than there otherwise would have been; nevertheless, I loved the space. It was everything I wanted.

Early Friday morning, a week after viewing the property, I signed my name, Lydia Hoffman, to the two-year lease. I was handed the keys and a copy of the rental agreement. I moved into my new home that very day as excited as I can remember being about anything. I felt as if I was just starting my life and in more ways than I care to count, I actually was.

I opened A Good Yarn on the last Tuesday in April. I felt a sense of pride and anticipation as I stood in the middle of my store, surveying the colors that surrounded me. I could only imagine what my sister would say when she learned I'd gone through with this. I hadn't asked her advice because I already knew what Margaret's response would be. She isn't—to put it mildly—the encouraging type.

I'd found a carpenter who'd built some cubicles for me, three rows of them, painted a pristine white. Most of the yarn had arrived on Friday and I'd spent the weekend sorting it by weight and color and arranging it neatly in the cubicles. I'd bought a secondhand cash register, refin-ished the counter and set up racks of knitting supplies. I was ready for business.

This should have been a happy moment for me but instead, I found myself struggling to hold back tears. Dad would've been so pleased if he could have seen what I'd done. He'd been my support and my source of strength, my guiding light. I was so shocked when he died.

You see, I'd always assumed I would die before my father.

Most people find talk of death unsettling, but I've lived with the threat of it for so long, it doesn't have that effect on me.The possibility of death has been my reality forthe last fourteen years, and I'm as comfortable talking about it as I am the weather.

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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 627 )
Rating Distribution

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(234)

4 Star

(194)

3 Star

(127)

2 Star

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(40)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 630 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 21, 2010

    A feel good book!

    This was my weekly free book on my Nook a couple of weeks ago. It looked interesting but I wasn't familiar with the author but since it was free I downloaded it. After I started reading it I couldn't put it down. There are four main characters in the book and every chapter switches to a different character's perspective. Sometimes the chapter will end leaving you hanging and I couldn't wait to get to the next chapter from that characters perspective to see how it finished out. Even though I am not a knitter it was easy to relate to these women because they are all going through events in their lives that could happen to anyone. I am a 23 year old female and this book was right up my alley!

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 1, 2009

    Reading "The Shop on Blossom Street" will make anyone want to knit!

    This book has such a warm, charming feeling throughout. What a wonderful writing style to get the readers wrapped up in the characters and keeping the reader turning the pages, dying to see how each main character unfolds her life. It is wonderful to see how each woman gets to the Good Yarn store and the effect it has on her. Every reader can relate to the variety of knitters introduced in this book and how their lives become more enriched because of their new found friendships.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2010

    A good book for a rainy day

    I downloaded this book to my ebook collection on my nook because it was offered for free. I have never read any books by this author, so I thought I would give it a try. I was pleasantly surprised. It was easy to relate to the different characters and the book never really dragged along in any place. I really liked how all the characters ended up with a special bond in the end, but each had their own unique story. This book really kept me interested and made me want to read more. Apparently this book is the first of a series by this author. I will definitely be reading the rest of the series.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2008

    A Refreshing Read.....

    This was such a refreshing book. I am always amazed at how I can become so involved with Macomber's characters. The story focuses on the lives of 4 women who are COMPLETELY different but their lives become involved together. Wonderful!!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2008

    Good, engaging read

    This was my first Macomber book and I'm definately interested in reading more. I loved how different the characters were and how their lives all came together through adversity and a happy ending.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2008

    Pretty Good

    I thought the book and storyline was well written and flowed together well. It was a nice, sweet, typical read but I did enjoy it.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2010

    GREAT READ

    I found this book to be a fast, enjoyable and easy read. The author has a great way of describing the characters and I highly recommend this book. It was a free ebook (not a book I would have purchased) - but I am certainly going to now purchase more books by this author.

    CL

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2010

    Great light read

    I like happy endings. So, sometimes I give the more intense literature and non-fiction a rest and pick up a light read. This is a cute story that is very touching. It would be good for say a vacation or summer book. I have the e-book version but went to buy a paperback for my mother (who doesn't have a reader). I know she'll enjoy it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 2, 2009

    A Definite "Must Read"

    A friend recommended the Blossom series and I am so glad she did. I started with this book, the first in the series. The characters were fun, just very "normal" everyday people. It was hard to put this book down. I couldn't wait to start the next book in the series, "A Good Yarn".

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A Must Read for Knitters

    This has to be my most treasured book in my library. I have read and re-read it over 5 times. It is such a feel good book!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2008

    Wonderful Read!

    I absolutely loved this book. I have read about 10 of Debbie Macomber's books and I have not been disappointed yet. I love the characters and how their problems overlap and intertwine. A great read!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2006

    A Great Read!

    This was the first Debbie Macomber book I read. You really feel like you get to know the characters in this book. It's a book with a happy ending(don't we all that?)I enjoyed this book so much, I decided to read other books by Macomber!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 4, 2006

    EXCELLENT READ!!

    I adore Debbie Macomber. I have read plenty by her and truly found this book amazing!! The characters and their lives will keep you captivated. I didn't put it down until I was finished. It was sweet and totally enjoying!! I can't wait to read 'A Good Yarn'. This book is a must read!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2012

    Highly Recommended - You must check it out!!!

    At first I was hesitant about reading this book. I enjoy reading murder mystery novels. But this book was something different. I decided to read it because I used to love to Knit and I haven't done it in a long time, and I was hoping to get back into it again. This book will help you with that, but it would also help you to believe in romance, hope and friendship. If you have lost any hope....after reading this book you get the hope back and much more.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 22, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Thoroughly enjoyable read

    This is my second book in the Blossom Street series and I found it difficult to put down. Three women join the proprietor of a new yarn shop in Seattle for weekly knitting lessons. Each of the four have issues that they may not be aware will affect the group. As they spend more time together, lives are changed by the interactions of the group members. Sweet romance is a given. I'm on to the next book in the series!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 31, 2011

    highly recommended

    thoroughly enjoyable read. a comfort read for sure, cant wait to start the 2nd one, "a good yarn"

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 12, 2011

    Simply wonderful!

    This is the first book that i have read by this author and I am hooked! Cant wait to start the next one!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2014

    Enjoyable read

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 28, 2014

    To below from hannah the owner of this house

    I live here suck it

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2014

    003 BARNES AVE FOR SALE

    5 bed 2 bath good for large family
    67,068

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