Shoplifting From American Apparel [NOOK Book]

Overview

Set mostly in Manhattan—although also featuring Atlantic City, Brooklyn, GMail Chat, and Gainsville, Florida—this autobiographical novella, spanning two years in the life of a young writer with a cultish following, has been described by the author as “A shoplifting book about vague relationships,” “2 parts shoplifting arrest, 5 parts vague relationship issues,” and “An ultimately life-affirming book about how the unidirectional nature of time ...
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Shoplifting From American Apparel

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Overview

Set mostly in Manhattan—although also featuring Atlantic City, Brooklyn, GMail Chat, and Gainsville, Florida—this autobiographical novella, spanning two years in the life of a young writer with a cultish following, has been described by the author as “A shoplifting book about vague relationships,” “2 parts shoplifting arrest, 5 parts vague relationship issues,” and “An ultimately life-affirming book about how the unidirectional nature of time renders everything beautiful and sad.”
 
From VIP rooms in hip New York City clubs to central booking in Chinatown, from New York University’s Bobst Library to a bus in someone’s backyard in a college-town in Florida, from Bret Easton Ellis to Lorrie Moore, and from Moby to Ghost Mice, it explores class, culture, and the arts in all their American forms through the funny, journalistic, and existentially-minded narrative of someone trying to both “not be a bad person” and “find some kind of happiness or something,” while he is driven by his failures and successes at managing his art, morals, finances, relationships, loneliness, confusion, boredom, future, and depression.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781612190280
  • Publisher: Melville House Publishing
  • Publication date: 12/29/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 567,854
  • File size: 204 KB

Meet the Author

Tao Lin
Tao Lin was born in 1983, and raised in Orlando, Florida. In 2007 Melville House published his first two works of fiction, the short story collection Bed, and the novel Eeeee Eee Eeee, simultaneously. Lin quickly became an underground sensation with a huge cult following. In 2008, Lin published his poetry collection, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. It has been assigned as a text book in several college level psychology courses.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(3)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

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Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 2, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    It's a new world for fiction

    Just this morning NPR broadcaster Lynn Neary opined that ebooks and online mobile reading will make writers and readers of traditional books less central to the important intellectual challenges being debated today. Since most ebooks are simply a repackaging of "traditional" books, I question that assertion, but it did make me take another look at Tao Lin's Shoplifting from American Apparel. It occured to me that the style, which hasn't a strong narrative thread but is bits of thought, hints, strings of conversations, emails, phone calls, all force us to imagine, devise a "point", and visualize, perhaps in ways that we have not with more heavily burdened fiction. Traditional storytellers create a world, peopled with characters, padded with description and narrative and plot, and may take our autonomy and creativeness from us. Tao Lin has chosen threads for us to follow, and merely indicates a direction. This particular book has a friendly, hapless main character, Sam, who has his heart in the right place, but who seems to circle the "point" rather aimlessly.
    However confused and sophomoric our picaresque hero may be, we find ourselves signing up to follow his tweets.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 17, 2011

    crapola

    another installment of crap and brain-sneeze from the newest overrated hipster from brooklyn. time to move on...

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2014

    Susan

    Sits, twirling her pencil. (Sex party room is on res20)

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 8 Customer Reviews

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