Short and Tall Tales: Moose County Legends Collected by James Mackintosh Qwilleran

( 9 )

Overview

Fictional columnist James Qwilleran has finally completed his book showcasing the stories related to him by residents of Moose County-that famous region four hundred miles north of everywhere. With an introduction by Lilian Jackson Braun, this delightful volume reveals the offbeat "history" of Moose County-in never-before-published stories. It's a treat for old and new fans alike.

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Short and Tall Tales: Moose County Legends Collected by James Mackintosh Qwilleran

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Overview

Fictional columnist James Qwilleran has finally completed his book showcasing the stories related to him by residents of Moose County-that famous region four hundred miles north of everywhere. With an introduction by Lilian Jackson Braun, this delightful volume reveals the offbeat "history" of Moose County-in never-before-published stories. It's a treat for old and new fans alike.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Lilian Jackson Braun readers have been eagerly anticipating James Mackintosh Qwilleran's collection of tales ever since the protagonist of the bestselling The Cat Who… series announced (in 1997's The Cat Who Tailed a Thief) that he planned to write a book showcasing the many strange and wonderful legends of Moose County.

We've seen samples of these tales throughout the series, and now the fruits of "Qwill's" efforts have been collected in a charming volume. These 27 eclectic stories -- recounting strange happenings, mysterious occurrences, good works, chicanery, ghostly visitations, crooks, and heroes -- share some classic anecdotes (each introduced by Qwilleran and told with varying degrees of embellishment) from Moose County history. Readers may miss tales of Qwill's own feline companions, Koko and Yum Yum (understandably absent from this volume since, like Qwill, the cats are not natives of Moose County), but all cat lovers may rest assured that Qwill has not failed to pay tribute to the role of cats in local history.

We asked Lilian Jackson Braun to talk about her The Cat Who… mysteries, James Qwilleran's perspective on Moose County history, and this delightful collection of Short and Tall Tales. Find out what she had to say in our exclusive author essay.

Publishers Weekly
Fans of Lilian Jackson Braun's Cat Who... series won't want to miss Short and Tall Tales: Moose County Legends Collected by James Mackintosh Qwilleran. In the voice of Qwill, her beloved fictional journalist, Braun presents 27 amusing yarns, from "The True(?) History of Squunk Water" to "Those Pushy Moose County Blueberries."
Library Journal
Braun here presents stories about the denizens of Moose County, presumably collected by the journalist hero of her numerous mysteries. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780515136357
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/25/2003
  • Series: Cat Who... Series , #2
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 436,247
  • Product dimensions: 4.36 (w) x 6.78 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

Lilian Jackson Braun

Lilian Jackson Braun is the author of twenty-four previous Cat Who . . . novels and the upcoming The Cat Who Brought Down the House.

Biography

The history of Lilian Jackson Braun is perhaps as exciting and mysterious as her novels. Between 1966 and 1968, she published three novels to critical acclaim: The Cat Who Could Read Backwards, The Cat Who Ate Danish Modern and The Cat Who Turned On and Off. In 1966, The New York Times labeled Braun, "the new detective of the year." Then, for reasons unknown, the rising mystery author disappeared from the publishing scene.

It wasn't until 1986 that the Berkley Publishing Group reintroduced Braun to the public with the publication of an original paperback, The Cat Who Saw Red. Within two years, Berkeley released four new novels in paperback and reprinted the three mysteries from the sixties. G.P. Putnam's Sons has since published seventeen Cat Who... novels, among them The Cat Who Went Up The Creek, The Cat Who Smelled a Rat, The Cat Who Robbed The Bank, The Cat Who Saw Stars, The Cat Who Tailed a Thief, The Cat Who Blew the Whistle, The Cat Who Said Cheese, The Cat Who Came to Breakfast, The Cat Who Went Into The Closet, The Cat Who Wasn't There, The Cat Who Moved The Mountain, The Cat Who Knew a Cardinal, The Cat Who Lived High, The Cat who Talked to Ghosts, The Cat Who Went Underground, The Cat Who Sniffed Glue, The Cat Who Saw Stars, and The Cat Who Sang For the Birds.

Even though Braun claims that her cats have never done anything extraordinary, her fictional cats, Koko and Yum Yum, solve crimes and delight fans in book after book. Braun says the reason for her success is that "people are simply tired of all the blood. I write what is called the classic mystery." She says that while "not all mystery fans like cats, all cat-fanciers seem to like mysteries. That makes for a large audience, since 26% of all American households own 53.9 million cats between them."

Braun was the "Good Living" editor of The Detroit Free Press for 29 years.

Author biography courtesy of Penguin Group (USA).

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    1. Hometown:
      North Carolina
    1. Date of Birth:
      November 30, 1915
    2. Place of Birth:
      Massachusetts
    1. Date of Death:
      June 4, 2011
    2. Place of Death:
      South Carolina

Read an Excerpt

Short and Tall Tales

Moose County Legends Collected by James Mackintosh Qwilleran
By Lilian Jackson Braun

Thorndike Press

Copyright © 2003 Lilian Jackson Braun
All right reserved.

ISBN: 0786256443

Excerpt

The Legend of the Rubbish Heap

A Chronicle of Two Pioneer Families

In the mid-nineteenth century, when Moose County was beginning to boom, it was a Gold Rush without the gold. There were veins of coal to be mined, forests to be lumbered, granite to be quarried, land to be developed, fortunes to be made. It would become the richest county in the state.

In 1859 two penniless youths from Germany arrived by schooner, by way of Canada. On setting foot on the foreign soil, they looked this way and that to get their bearings, and both saw it at the same time! A piece of paper money in a rubbish heap! Without stopping to inquire its value, they tore it in half to signify their partnership. It would be share and share alike from then on. Their names were Otto Wilhelm Limburger and Karl Gustav Klingenschoen. They were fifteen years old.

Labor was needed. They hired on as carpenters, worked long hours, obeyed orders, learned everything they could, used their wits, watched for opportunities, took chances, borrowed wisely, cheated a little, and finally launched a venture of their own.

By the time they were in their thirties, Otto and Karl dominated the food and shelterindustry. They owned all the rooming houses, eating places, and travelers' inns along the shoreline. Only then did they marry: Otto, a God-fearing woman named Gretchen; Karl, a fun-loving woman nicknamed Minnie. At the double wedding the friends pledged to name their children after each other. They hoped for boys, but girls could be named Karla and Wilhelmina. Thus the two families became even more entwined...until rumors about Karl's wife started drifting back from the waterfront. When Karl denied the slander, Otto trusted him.

But there was more! One day Karl approached his partner with an idea for expanding their empire. They would add saloons, dance halls, and female entertainment of various kinds. Otto was outraged! The two men argued. They traded insults. They even traded a few blows and, with noses bleeding, tore up the fragments of currency that had been in their pockets since the miracle of the rubbish heap.

Karl proceeded on his own and did extremely well, financially. To prove it, he built a fine fieldstone mansion in Pickax City, across from the courthouse. In retaliation Otto imported masons and woodworkers from Europe to build a brick palace in the town of Black Creek. How the community reacted to the two architectural wonders should be mentioned. The elite of the county vied for invitations to sip tea and view Otto's black walnut woodwork; Karl and Minnie sent out invitations to a party and no one came.

When it was known that the brick mansion would be the scene of a wedding, the best families could talk of nothing else. The bride was Otto's only daughter; he had arranged for her to marry a suitable young man from the Goodwinter family; the date was set. Who would be invited? Was it true that Otto had taken his daughter before a magistrate and legally changed her name from Karla to Elsa? It was true. Elsa's dower chest was filled with fine household linens and intimate wedding finery. Gifts were being delivered in the best carriages in town. Seamstresses were working overtime on costumes for the wedding guests. Gowns for the bridal party were being shipped from Germany. Suppose there was a storm at sea! Suppose they did not arrive in time!

Then, on the very eve of the nuptials, Otto's daughter eloped with the youngest son of Karl Klingenschoen!

Shock, embarrassment, sheer horror, and the maddening suspicion that Karl and Minnie had promoted the defection-all these emotions combined to affect Otto's mind.

As for the young couple, there were rumors that they had gone to San Francisco. When the news came, a few years later, that the young couple had lost their lives in the earthquake, Elsa's father had no idea who they were.

Karl and Minnie lived out their lives in the most splendid house in Pickax, ignored by everyone of social standing. Karl never knew that his immense fortune was wiped out, following the financial crash of 1929.

Toward the end of the century, Otto's sole descendant was an eccentric who sat on the porch of the brick palace and threw stones at dogs.

Karl's sole descendant was Fanny Klingenschoen, who recovered her grandfather's wealth ten times over.

Eventually the saga of the two families took a curious twist. The Klingenschoen Foundation has purchased two properties from the Limburger estate: the mansion in Black Creek and the hotel in Pickax. The former has become the Nutcracker Inn; the latter is now the Mackintosh Inn. The "legend of the rubbish heap" has come full circle.



Continues...


Excerpted from Short and Tall Tales by Lilian Jackson Braun Copyright © 2003 by Lilian Jackson Braun. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 1
1 The Legend of the Rubbish Heap 3
2 Secret of the Blacksmith's Wife 9
3 Housecalls on Horseback 15
4 Hilda the Clipper 21
5 Milo the Potato Farmer 27
6 The Little Old Man in the Woods 33
7 My Great-Grandmother's Coal Mine 39
8 The True (?) History of Squunk Water 45
9 Whooping It Up with the Loggers 49
10 "The Princess" and the Pirates 55
11 Wildcattin' with an Old Hog 59
12 The Scratching Under the Door 65
13 The Dimsdale Jinx 69
14 The Mystery of Dank Hollow 75
15 Tale of Two Tombstones 81
16 The Pork-and-Beans Incident at Boggy Bottom 87
17 At Last, a Hospital in the Wilderness 93
18 Emmaline and the Spiral Staircase 99
19 The Curious Fate of the Jenny Lee 103
20 A Scary Experience on a Covered Bridge 109
21 A Cat Tale: Holy Terror and the Bishop 113
22 Those Pushy Moose County Blueberries 117
23 The Curse on the Apple Orchard 123
24 Matilda, a Family Heroine 129
25 How Pleasant Street Got Its Name 133
26 The Noble Sons of the Noose 137
27 Phineas Ford's Fabulous Collection 141
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First Chapter

The Legend of the Rubbish Heap
A Chronicle of Two Pioneer Families

In the mid-nineteenth century, when Moose County was beginning to boom, it was a Gold Rush without the gold. There were veins of coal to be mined, forests to be lumbered, granite to be quarried, land to be developed, fortunes to be made. It would become the richest county in the state.

In 1859 two penniless youths from Germany arrived by schooner, by way of Canada. On setting foot on the foreign soil, they looked this way and that to get their bearings, and both saw it at the same time! A piece of paper money in a rubbish heap! Without stopping to inquire its value, they tore it in half to signify their partnership. It would be share and share alike from then on. Their names were Otto Wilhelm Limburger and Karl Gustav Klingenschoen. They were fifteen years old.

Labor was needed. They hired on as carpenters, worked long hours, obeyed orders, learned everything they could, used their wits, watched for opportunities, took chances, borrowed wisely, cheated a little, and finally launched a venture of their own.

By the time they were in their thirties, Otto and Karl dominated the food and shelter industry. They owned all the rooming houses, eating places, and travelers' inns along the shoreline. Only then did they marry: Otto, a God-fearing woman named Gretchen; Karl, a fun-loving woman nicknamed Minnie. At the double wedding the friends pledged to name their children after each other. They hoped for boys, but girls could be named Karla and Wilhelmina. Thus the two families became even more entwined...until rumors about Karl's wife started drifting back from the waterfront. When Karl denied the slander, Otto trusted him.

But there was more! One day Karl approached his partner with an idea for expanding their empire. They would add saloons, dance halls, and female entertainment of various kinds. Otto was outraged! The two men argued. They traded insults. They even traded a few blows and, with noses bleeding, tore up the fragments of currency that had been in their pockets since the miracle of the rubbish heap.

Karl proceeded on his own and did extremely well, financially. To prove it, he built a fine fieldstone mansion in Pickax City, across from the courthouse. In retaliation Otto imported masons and woodworkers from Europe to build a brick palace in the town of Black Creek. How the community reacted to the two architectural wonders should be mentioned. The elite of the county vied for invitations to sip tea and view Otto's black walnut woodwork; Karl and Minnie sent out invitations to a party and no one came.

When it was known that the brick mansion would be the scene of a wedding, the best families could talk of nothing else. The bride was Otto's only daughter; he had arranged for her to marry a suitable young man from the Goodwinter family; the date was set. Who would be invited? Was it true that Otto had taken his daughter before a magistrate and legally changed her name from Karla to Elsa? It was true. Elsa's dower chest was filled with fine household linens and intimate wedding finery. Gifts were being delivered in the best carriages in town. Seamstresses were working overtime on costumes for the wedding guests. Gowns for the bridal party were being shipped from Germany. Suppose there was a storm at sea! Suppose they did not arrive in time!

Then, on the very eve of the nuptials, Otto's daughter eloped with the youngest son of Karl Klingenschoen!

Shock, embarrassment, sheer horror, and the maddening suspicion that Karl and Minnie had promoted the defection-all these emotions combined to affect Otto's mind.

As for the young couple, there were rumors that they had gone to San Francisco. When the news came, a few years later, that the young couple had lost their lives in the earthquake, Elsa's father had no idea who they were.

Karl and Minnie lived out their lives in the most splendid house in Pickax, ignored by everyone of social standing. Karl never knew that his immense fortune was wiped out, following the financial crash of 1929.

Toward the end of the century, Otto's sole descendant was an eccentric who sat on the porch of the brick palace and threw stones at dogs.

Karl's sole descendant was Fanny Klingenschoen, who recovered her grandfather's wealth ten times over.

Eventually the saga of the two families took a curious twist. The Klingenschoen Foundation has purchased two properties from the Limburger estate: the mansion in Black Creek and the hotel in Pickax. The former has become the Nutcracker Inn; the latter is now the Mackintosh Inn. The "legend of the rubbish heap" has come full circle.

--from Short and Tall Tales by Lillian Jackson Braun, Copyright © October 2002, Putnam Pub Group, a member of Penguin Putnam, Inc., used by permission.

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Interviews & Essays

Exclusive Author Essay
After a lifetime of not reading mysteries, imagine my surprise to realize that I've now written 25 of them, going on 26. I enjoy writing lighthearted fiction. I think cats can be quite comical, and so can ordinary, everyday people, and I love both. Put that together with a little played-down murder mystery, and "presto," you have The Cat Who.... series!

When my protagonist, Jim Qwilleran, moved to Moose County, 400 miles north of everywhere, his newspaper beat put him in touch with folks whose families had lived there for generations. They had stories to tell…and Qwill had a tape recorder. He'd always talked about "writing a book" about this or that, but he never got around to it…until he collected a few local legends. He said he would title it Short & Tall Tales. No one believed it would ever materialize; but he persisted. Does that mean there will be more tales and another collection? Actually, Qwill has another idea, for a series of true-life sketches about…. Sorry, I can't reveal any further details.

Meanwhile, Short and Tall Tales includes some true history and incidents based on actual happenings, but altered in the telling…some ghost stories that raise questions with no answers…three stories about cats (Punkin and Matilda were heroines; Holy Terror was, well, a holy terror)…and one genuine hoax that's good for a laugh.

It was readers who pushed this book to fruition; they kept asking me, "Will Qwill ever publish his tales?" Believe me, this was an easy book to create. The stories had already been printed in The Cat Who… novels. And, although credit is given to Qwilleran for these stories, I cannot tell a lie. They come from the same imagination that has been "making up stories" since the age of three. What is imagination but a distillation of things overheard on the bus, read in a travel brochure, remembered from family conversations, and dreamed after a late supper? Qwilleran himself -- and Koko and Yum Yum -- come from the same imagination, although they are all very real to me.

Readers wishing to write to me may write in care of Penguin Putnam Inc. 375 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10014. Lilian Jackson Braun

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Customer Reviews

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( 9 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2014

    Navysky

    Navysky watched her pad off, a little confused by her actions. "Okay," he murmured and picked up the small mouse, trailing after her.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2014

    Shellpool

    She shrugs, standing up. "No, I don't." She sighs, thinking. After a long moment she turns away. "I'm going back to camp...see you there.." She cals over her shoulder, before trotting off to camp.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2014

    Deja vu!!!

    If you've already read The Cat Who.... series, don't buy this book. All of these "accounts" were presented in the other books.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2003

    Such a Great Book - I hope there are more to come.

    I just wanted to say that I loved this book. It was so cute. As an avid Cat Who reader it was good to see all the little tid bits from Qwill's talks with the people from PickAxe to be put into print.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2003

    A must for Cat Who fans

    Short & Tall Tales, by Lilian Jackson Braun is subtitled Moose County Legends Collected by James Mackintosh Qwilleran, is just that. Qwill, as he is known in Moose County 400 miles north of everywhere, is a reporter for the local newspaper. Those of us who have read Lilian Jackson Braun¿s two dozen books in The Cat Who¿mystery series featuring Qwill and his two crime solving Siamese cats will probably find this short, quick reading, cute collection of 27 tales interesting. Others not having the experience will not find interest in this collection. Now we wait her 25th novel due out in February ¿03.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 25, 2002

    Qwill has finally finished his book!

    As most fans of Lilian Jackson Braun's "The Cat Who..." series will know, James Qwilleran has been collecting stories and legends that have been passed down for hundreds of years in Moose County. At last the book is finished! Although most, if not all, of the stories have been heard before in the books following "The Cat Who Tailed a thief" this is a MUST HAVE for true fans of Ms. Brauns books. Each short story has a brief narrative about the storyteller and some historical information supplied by Qwill. There is an INTRODUCTION by Lilian Jackson Braun to the book itself as well as introducing new readers to the "Collector" of these tales- James Qwilleran. It is a great addition to the ever-growing collection of work based on this award-winning series. Besides, the holidays are coming and this is a "Purrr-fect" gift for the "Cat Who..." fan in your life.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    A winner from James Mackintosh Quilleran

    Fans of The Cat Who... mystery series have something to celebrate. The protagonist of the novels, James Mackintosh Quilleran, has finally finished his work SHORT AND TALL TALES, a series of stories told to him by the residents of Moose county. At the beginning of each tale, Quill explains how each story came into his possession and who gave it to him. <P>Every reader will have a favorite or two but all the unique anecdotes in this book make a delightful holiday gift especially for series fans. Two of this reviewer¿s favorites are the ¿Secret Of The Blacksmith¿s Wife¿ (revealed to her grandson on her deathbed) and the ¿Tale Of Two Tombstones¿ (related by the stonecutter told to his grandson). <P>There are twenty-seven stories in this collection and anytime the reader feels blue, try this collection for a pick-me-up. <P>Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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