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A Short History of the World
     

A Short History of the World

3.1 7
by H. G. Wells, Michael Sherborne (Editor), Norman Stone (Introduction)
 

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Of the more than one hundred books that H. G. Wells published in his lifetime, this is one of the most ambitious. Spanning the origins of the Earth to the outcome of World War I, A Short History of the World is an engrossing account of the evolution of life and the development of the human race. Wells brings his monumental learning and penetrating historical

Overview

Of the more than one hundred books that H. G. Wells published in his lifetime, this is one of the most ambitious. Spanning the origins of the Earth to the outcome of World War I, A Short History of the World is an engrossing account of the evolution of life and the development of the human race. Wells brings his monumental learning and penetrating historical insight to bear on the Neolithic era, the rise of Judaism, the Golden Age of Athens, the life of Christ, the rise of Islam, the discovery of America, the Industrial Revolution, and a host of other subjects. Breathtaking in scope, this thought-provoking masterwork remains one of the most readable and rewarding of its kind.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780141441825
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/31/2007
Series:
Penguin Classics Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
400
Sales rank:
866,374
Product dimensions:
5.04(w) x 7.74(h) x 0.89(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

Meet the Author

H.G. Wells was a professional writer and journalist, who published more than a hundred books, including novels, histories, essays and programmes for world regeneration. Wells's prophetic imagination was first displayed in pioneering works of science fiction, but later he became an apostle of socialism, science and progress. His controversial views on sexual equality and the shape of a truly developed nation remain directly relevant to our world today. He was, in Bertrand Russell's words, 'an important liberator of thought and action'.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
September 21, 1866
Date of Death:
August 13, 1946
Place of Birth:
Bromley, Kent, England
Place of Death:
London, England
Education:
Normal School of Science, London, England

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A Short History of the World 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The Greatest Story Ever Told! Along with The Outline of History, this Short History of the World is the best and most underrated book by H. G. Wells, the master of science fiction, much better than all his scientific romances combined since it is actually a true story. It tells the epic adventure of the history of the world, life, and mankind according to the sciences of astronomy, biology, geology, anthropology, and world history. This is the modern worldview expounded by Wells in the early twentieth century. The book spans from the origins of the solar system to the outbreak of World War 1, with footnotes covering later history like World War 2 and the Space Race. Before the Big Bang theory, Wells speculates that the universe has existed for billions of years or has existed for an infinite amount of time. After dealing with the origin and evolution of our planet, the story covers the origin of life in the first seas and the evolution of life towards dry land, the sky, and beyond. The geological ages covered include the Ages of Fish, Amphibians, Reptiles, Mammals and Birds, Apes and Submen, and finally Mankind. Despite the subsequent progressive ages, the Paleolithic Age, the Neolithic Age, the Industrial Age, and the various imperial ages of the Persians, Greeks, Romans, Mongols, Arabs, and later Europeans, the many wars detailed in the book and the Darwinian struggle for existence prove that history is more nature red in tooth and claw and more about the march of armies than the march of progress and enlightenment. The book likewise covers the history of religion, including paganism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism, giving interesting biographies of the major founders of these great but outworn faiths. Despite the sufferings and tragedies of world history, life moves on and slowly progresses, perpetually dying as the old generation and being reborn as the new generation, and the range of life widens until the modern era when life has left our little planet and started to explore the wider universe. Thus, humanity finds itself on the path either to self-imposed destruction by modern global warfare or to further social and biological evolution in the formation of a world state and the colonization of space. It appears despite the sheer length of this epic story, we are merely at the twilight of the dawn and future history will be far longer and greater than all the history already recorded, if we don’t blow ourselves up first of course. I’d recommend this book as a good swift prelude before one reads the larger and better Outline of History, also by Wells, and the modern version of Mr. Wells’ History, Big History by David Christian. This story is clearly the greatest story ever told!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Unecspected
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Completely boring. DO NOT READ!!! REPEAT:DO NOT READ!!!! I literally would have given it zero stars. Its too....... just not my type of reading. But seriously, i wouldnt buy this book if it was required for class. Dont even think about reading it. Not once, and dont even go to twice.