The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway

The Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway

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by Ernest Hemingway
     
 

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At the age of twenty-two, Ernest Hemingway wrote his first short story, "Up in Michigan." Seventeen years and forty-eight titles later, he was the undisputed master of the short-story form and the leading American man of letters. The Short Stories, introduced here with a revealing preface by the author, chronicles Hemingway's development as a writer, from his earliest…  See more details below

Overview

At the age of twenty-two, Ernest Hemingway wrote his first short story, "Up in Michigan." Seventeen years and forty-eight titles later, he was the undisputed master of the short-story form and the leading American man of letters. The Short Stories, introduced here with a revealing preface by the author, chronicles Hemingway's development as a writer, from his earliest attempts in the chapbook Three Stories and Ten Poems, published in Paris in 1923, to his more mature accomplishments in Winner Take Nothing. Originally published in 1938 along with The Fifth Column, this collection premiered "The Capital of the World" and "Old Man at the Bridge," which derive from Hemingway's experiences in Spain, as well as "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber" and "The Snows of Kilimanjaro," which figure among the finest of Hemingway's short fictions.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
They are a highly readable feast, these 172 articles written by Hemingway for the Toronto Star between early 1920 and late 1924. They range from amusing sketches of everyday life in Toronto to firsthand and sometimes quite lengthly reports on the social and political scene in postwar Europe. Whether the subjects are Lloyd George's visit to Canada, the behavior of women at prize-fights, Christmas in Paris, bullfighting in Pamplona, France's political woes, Mussolini's Fascists or Toronto's young Communists, the pieces invariably exhibit Hemingway's expertise at digging out the facts, his uncanny grasp of dialogue and his shining simplicity of style. They also contain a surprisingly strong element of humor. Here is Hemingway ironically knowing, skilled in his craft and very wide awake, a literary apprentice who hardly seems an apprentice. November 18
Library Journal
Hemingway undervalued his journal ism, insisting it was ``timely rather than permanent.'' But many of the 172 arti cles he wrote for the Toronto Star merit attention and admiration. On assign ment in post-war Europe, Hemingway observed and absorbed many of the subjects (war and love, courage and sham, cruelty and injustice) that were to shape his fiction. His prose style also began to assume its distinctive rhythms and diction. Several of these dispatches would reappear,shrewdly altered, as vi gnettes in In Our Time (the thrill of trout and tuna fishing; the conscious ness of bullfighting as more than sport``a very great tragedy''). In By - line: Ernest Hemingway (Scribner, 1967), William White included only 29 of these pieces. The full edition is most welcome. Arthur Waldhorn, English Dept., City Coll., CUNY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780684151557
Publisher:
Scribner
Publication date:
12/01/1977
Series:
Hudson River Editions Series
Pages:
512

Read an Excerpt

Preface

The first four stories are the last ones I have written. The others follow in the order in which they were originally published.

The first one I wrote was Up in Michigan, written in Paris in 1921. The last was Old Man at the Bridge cabled from Barcelona in April of 1938.

Beside The Fifth Column, I wrote The Killers, Today Is Friday, Ten Indians, part of The Sun Also Rises and the first third of To Have and Have Not in Madrid. It was always a good place for working. So was Paris, and so were Key West, Florida, in the cool months; the ranch, near Cooke City, Montana; Kansas City; Chicago; Toronto, and Havana, Cuba.

Some other places were not so good but maybe we were not so good when we were in them.

There are many kinds of stories in this book. I hope that you will find some that you like. Reading them over, the ones I liked the best, outside of those that have achieved some notoriety so that school teachers include them in story collections that their pupils have to buy in story courses, and you are always faintly embarrassed to read them and wonder whether you really wrote them or did you maybe hear them somewhere, are The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber, In Another Country, Hills Like White Elephants, A Way You'll Never Be, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, A Clean Well-Lighted Place, and a story called The Light of the World which nobody else ever liked. There are some others too. Because if you did not like them you would not publish them.

In going where you have to go, and doing what you have to do, and seeing what you have to see, you dull and blunt the instrument you write with. But I would rather have it bent and dull and know I had to put it on the grindstone again and hammer it into shape and put a whetstone to it, and know that I had something to write about, than to have it bright and shining and nothing to say, or smooth and well-oiled in the closet, but unused.

Now it is necessary to get to the grindstone again. I would like to live long enough to write three more novels and twenty-five more stories. I know some pretty good ones.


Ernest Hemingway

1938

"The Battler"; "Big Two-Hearted River: Part I"; "Big Two-Hearted River: Part II"; "Cat in the Rain"; "Cross-Country Snow"; "The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife"; "The End of Something"; "Indian Camp"; "Mr. and Mrs. Elliot"; "My Old Man"; "Out of Season";
"The Revolutionist"; "Soldier's Home"; "The Three-Day Blow";
"A Very Short Story"; copyright © 1925 Charles Scribner's Sons;
renewal copyright © 1953 Ernest Hemingway

"Banal Story"; "A Canary for One"; "Hills Like White Elephants"; "In Another Country"; "The Killers"; "Now I Lay Me"; "A Pursuit Race"; "A Simple Enquiry"; "Ten Indians"; "Today Is Friday"; "The Undefeated"; copyright © 1927 Charles Scribner's Sons; renewal copyright © 1955 Ernest Hemingway

"The Alpine Idyll" copyright © 1927 The Macaulay Company;
renewal copyright © 1955 Ernest Hemingway

"Che Ti Dice Patria?" and "Fifty Grand' copyright © 1927 Ernest Hemingway; renewal copyright © 1955

"On the Quai at Smyrna" and "Wine of Wyoming" copyright © 1930 Charles Scribner's Sons; renewal copyright © 1958 Ernest Hemingway

"A Natural History of the Dead" copyright © 1932, 1933 Charles Scribner's Sons; renewal copyright © 1960 Ernest Hemingway; © 1961 Mary Hemingway

"After the Storm" copyright © 1932 Ernest Hemingway; renewal copyright © 1960

"A Clean, Well-Lighted Place"; "A Day's Wait"; "Fathers and Sons"; "The Gambler, the Nun, and the Radio"; "Homage to Switzerland"; "The Light of the World"; "The Mother of a Queen"; "One Reader Writes"; "The Sea Change"; "A Way You'll Never Be" copyright © 1933 Charles Scribner's Sons;
renewal copyright © 1961 Mary Hemingway

"God Rest You Merry, Gentlemen" copyright © 1933 Ernest Hemingway; renewal copyright © 1961 Mary Hemingway

"The Capital of the World"; "The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber"; "The Snows of Kilimanjaro" copyright © 1936 Ernest Hemingway;
renewal copyright © 1964 Mary Hemingway

"Old Man at the Bridge" and "Up in Michigan" copyright © 1938 Ernest Hemingway; renewal copyright © 1966 Mary Hemingway

"Capital of the World" was first published under the title "The Horns of the Bull."

"The Gambler, the Nun, and the Radio" was first published under the title "Give Us A Prescription, Doctor."

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Meet the Author

Ernest Hemingway did more to influence the style of English prose than any other writer of his time. Publication of The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms immediately established him as one of the greatest literary lights of the 20th century. His classic novella The Old Man and the Sea won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953. Hemingway was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1954. He died in 1961.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
July 21, 1899
Date of Death:
July 2, 1961
Place of Birth:
Oak Park, Illinois
Place of Death:
Ketchum, Idaho

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