Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 1; Symphony No. 9; Liadov: Baba Yaga; Musical Snuff Box

Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 1; Symphony No. 9; Liadov: Baba Yaga; Musical Snuff Box

5.0 1
by Seattle Symphony Orchestra
     
 
As is frequently the case with Shostakovich, the "First Cello Concerto" and "Ninth Symphonies" heard on this Artek album provide sharp contrast. On the one hand, there's the despondent, oppressive, even aggressive "Cello Concerto." This differs greatly from the almost jovial, cheeky frivolity found in much of the "Ninth Symphony." No

Overview

As is frequently the case with Shostakovich, the "First Cello Concerto" and "Ninth Symphonies" heard on this Artek album provide sharp contrast. On the one hand, there's the despondent, oppressive, even aggressive "Cello Concerto." This differs greatly from the almost jovial, cheeky frivolity found in much of the "Ninth Symphony." No fewer, however, are the technical and musical requirements needed in both works to ensure successful performances. The Seattle Symphony, conducted by Gerard Schwarz, and cellist Lynn Harrell provide technically brilliant performances of both works, which bring contrast to the fore. Schwarz draws these distinctions from his orchestra by emphasizing the high sounds of the violins, piccolos, and E flat clarinets, with the thundering, penetrating depth of the double basses and low brass. This extra weight placed on the outer voices helps illuminate the energy and emotional impact of Shostakovich's writing. Harrell's playing is also replete with contrast: angular and aggressive bowing in the first movement opening up against the almost glass-like stillness of the second movement. Harrell's powerful tone rises easily above the robust orchestration, yielding a first-rate performance of this taxing concerto. The disc concludes with five short works of Anatol Lyadov, a highly successful Russian composer a generation earlier than Shostakovich who has regrettably become largely overlooked. Schwarz brings these picturesque miniatures to life with the same playfulness and dedication as found in the Shostakovich.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/26/2011
Label:
Artek
UPC:
0661853005620
catalogNumber:
56
Rank:
125782

Tracks

  1. About Olden Times (Pro Slarinu), ballade for orchestra in D major, Op. 21b  - Anatol Lyadov  - Lynn Harrell  - Gerard Schwarz  -  Seattle Symphony Orchestra
  2. Enchanted Lake, for orchestra, Op. 62  - Anatol Lyadov  - Lynn Harrell  - Gerard Schwarz  -  Seattle Symphony Orchestra
  3. Kikimora for orchestra, Op. 63  - Anatol Lyadov  - Lynn Harrell  - Gerard Schwarz  -  Seattle Symphony Orchestra
  4. Musical Snuffbox, for piano (or orchestra), Op. 32  - Anatol Lyadov  - Lynn Harrell  - Gerard Schwarz  -  Seattle Symphony Orchestra
  5. Baba-Yaga, for orchestra, Op. 56  - Anatol Lyadov  - Lynn Harrell  - Gerard Schwarz  -  Seattle Symphony Orchestra
  6. Symphony No. 9 in E flat major, Op. 70  - Dmitry Shostakovich  - Lynn Harrell  - Gerard Schwarz  -  Seattle Symphony Orchestra
  7. Cello Concerto No. 1 in E flat major, Op. 107  - Dmitry Shostakovich  - John Cerminaro  - Lynn Harrell  - Gerard Schwarz  -  Seattle Symphony Orchestra

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Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 1; Symphony No. 9; Liadov: Baba Yaga; Musical Snuff Box 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
KlingonOpera More than 1 year ago
The listener expects this recording to be strong from the get-go, given that it features Lynn Harrell (cello), Gerard Schwarz, and the Seattle Symphony. And it delivers. The first piece is Shostakovich¿s Cello Concerto No. 1, and Lynn Harrell¿s playing is evocative and seems just right ¿ it matches the calling of the horns with just the right amount of active energy, but also maintains a level of longing warmth that is definitely there to be found at the core of this piece (it is particularly evident in the 2nd movement). The 4th movement has all of the driven Shostakovich energy, with the orchestra providing strong accompaniment to Mr. Harrell¿s cello. The second piece on the program is Shostakovich¿s Symphony No. 9, Op. 70. It is tender and unsettling and isolated and a number of other things ¿ which is exactly how it is supposed to be. The moderato movement is filled with a quiet sense of pathos that grows into yet another section of longing warmth. It is breathtaking how smoothly the Seattle Symphony manages this transition under Mr. Schwarz¿s direction. The horn solo in the 3rd and 4th movements is just dynamite. The 5th movement is so well done that ¿ well ¿ if you¿re a Shostakovich fan you just have to hear it. It¿s fantastic. The five Liadov pieces are relatively short, but with a distinctive Russian sense about them (of course). The Musical Snuff Box is playful and fun, but the jewel of the set is Kikimora ¿ operatic in nature, with a gorgeous English Horn solo. The Ballade is also wonderful and flowing and alive, and it is easy to understand why Liadov¿s music is among some of the most respected. It is a shame that his music is not heard more often, at least here in the West. All said and done, if you enjoy Shostakovich¿s music it is definitely worth adding this disc to your collection. If you are simply curious, the performances herein are a good eye-opener to what this composer and Liadov have to offer.