Should You Really Be a Lawyer?: The Guide to Smart Career Choices Before, During and After Law School
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Should You Really Be a Lawyer?: The Guide to Smart Career Choices Before, During and After Law School

4.7 7
by Schneider
     
 

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Walk through any bookstore and check the sections on Reference, Careers or Graduate School. You find all sorts of books that can help you ace the LSAT, get into a good law school, succeed on law school exams, land a legal job, and then manage your career. But none of them can help you answer the most basic question: should you go into law at all? Schneider and

Overview

Walk through any bookstore and check the sections on Reference, Careers or Graduate School. You find all sorts of books that can help you ace the LSAT, get into a good law school, succeed on law school exams, land a legal job, and then manage your career. But none of them can help you answer the most basic question: should you go into law at all? Schneider and Belsky's book is the first to help you decide whether to become a lawyer ... or whether to remain one.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780940675575
Publisher:
Niche Press, LLC
Publication date:
11/30/2004
Pages:
239
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.26(h) x 0.52(d)

What People are saying about this

Kathy Morris
An inventive and informative book for readers across the spectrum from pre-law to law students to lawyers. Read this book only if you care about your career.
JD, author and legal career counselor
Elaine Petrossian
This should be required reading for every law school applicant and pre-law advisor, and the self-assessment exercises should be added to the LSATs.
assistant dean Villanova University School of Law
Wendy Werner
I wish more of our students and alumni could have read this book before they made their biggest career decisions.
former assistant dean St. Louis University School of Law

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Should You Really Be a Lawyer?: The Guide to Smart Career Choices Before, During and After Law School 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great book, I know too many people who are going to law school without giving it enough consideration (especially what thier future career will entail) Prospective law students should read this book because it will either validate thier decision to go law school or cast some serious doubt on the decision that's worth exploring. Seems to me, either way, he or she will benefit.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As a student, I think this books is great because it is not like the average law career book.The author really wants the reader to understand what law school is really like and to make the right choice in deciding to go or not to go. The book is fun because it looks at the different aspects of the decision to attend law school and analyze them.Throughout the book, there are fun tests to do to see what one is really like and to help the reader exploring different possibilities for his/her future.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been a practicing lawyer for several years and wish I had had this book when I was making my decision about whether to go to law school. Back then, I bought every 'insider's' book I could to get a sense of the law schools I applied to - the culture, the profs, the % acceptance, the ratings, etc.. but in all my research, I didn't take a critical look at why I was going into the law in the first place - it just seemed like the right option at the time. This book is a very practical and helpful tool to figure out if law is the right fit for you. It's important to critically examine this decision - I found that I devoted my 20's to my choice to go to law school - working very hard and unhappily in law school and then taking a job at a Big Firm that paid big $ for 4 years afterwards just so I could pay off my school loans. A bigger sacrifice than I had understood when considering law school. Had this book been available, I believe it literally would have changed my life. It gives you a realistic view of what 'billable hours' are and how it affects your life, what options are available when you graduate, how debt affects your career choices, and also gives you the tools you need to figure out what you want. Don't make such a big decision without this book!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Many students are intrigued by the law, but does it mean they should go to law school? This book really helps readers look at all sides of the issue. The exercises, the common sense advice, and the authors' ability to challenge assumptions about law school, make it an excellent resource. If you're putting together prelaw resources (for yourself, your kids, or your students), make sure to add this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In my work with law students, I've read many books that provide basic information about the law school experience. This is the first that raises the critical decisions one must make about entering law school in the first place, whether or not to continue once you're there, and what employment options you have after graduation. I recommend it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a pre-law advisor, and I think this book raises all the questions that pre-law students should ask themselves (but often don't) before spending thousands of dollars and precious time applying to, and attending, law school. This book should be mandatory reading for every pre-law student.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As I was reading the book, I found myself getting agitated and defensive about my decision to be in law school. And I think that reflects very well on this book. Because over the last few years, I¿ve rationalized my choice TO DEATH -- but I didn¿t realize that I was incorporating so many of the fallacies and mind traps that the authors write about. I mean, whether it was telling myself that I wanted to be financially secure by my mid-thirties, or that I would use my law degree in a unique way and not fall into the ¿firm trap¿, I realize now I was just basing my decision-making on arbitrary and sometimes poorly-supported information. Sometimes, it wasn't based on information at all, but some nebulous notions that I picked up somewhere along the way of how people went through life and earned a living. Anyway, this book really forced me to re-examine the foundations of some of those decisions, and it was very effective in doing so. This book gives me a lot to think about, both now and in the future.