Shy Boy: The Horse That Came In From the Wild

Overview

World-famous horse gentler Monty Roberts reveals the unique rapport he shares with one special horse: a wild mustang

In this beautifully illustrated book, Monty Roberts's be loved horse Shy Boy takes center stage. In a gripping, intimate narrative and in one hundred color photos, Monty Roberts relives their unique relationship, beginning with his first encounter with the wild horse in the high desert. During a dramatic three day ride across a hundred miles, Monty Roberts used ...

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1999 Hardcover First Edition; First Printing New in Near Fine dust jacket 0060194332. D. J. Tiny chip at spine; Mylar cover; 8vo 8"-9" tall; 256 pages.

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1999 Hard cover First edition. STATED 1ST EDITION, 1ST PRINTING New. No dust jacket. BRIGHT CLEAN, BRAND NEW Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. With dust jacket. 256 p. Contains: ... Illustrations. Audience: General/trade. Read more Show Less

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Christopher Dydyk (Photographer) Scranton, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. 1999 Hard Cover First Edition, First Printing Collectible-New in Fine jacket BRAND NEW & COLLECTIBLE. First ... Edition, First Printing. Biography of a horse. The story of the taming of Shy Boy, a wild mustang of the high desert...or, the love story of Shy Boy and horse-gentler Monty Roberts. Horse and man met in the desert, and PBS documentary camera filmed a dramatic three-day ride across a hundred miles to Monty's farm house. A year later Shy Boy was fully settled. Still, would the horse rather be free with his own tribe? Monty takes Shy Boy back to the desert to allow him a choice. Read more Show Less

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1999 Hard cover First edition. New in new dust jacket. Signed by author. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. With dust jacket. 256 p. Contains: Illustrations. Audience: ... General/trade. HIGHLY ILLUSTRATED Read more Show Less

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New York, NY 1999 Hardcover New Book in Good jacket New. in good + dust jacket. text is clean. Very nice book. Quantity Available: 1. ISBN: 0060194332. ISBN/EAN: 9780060194338. ... Inventory No: ABE533667891. Read more Show Less

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1999-05-04 Hardcover New in New jacket COLLECTIBLE. STATED FIRST EDITION. ALSO FIRST PRINTING WITH FULL 10 DIGIT NUMBER LINE. New Hardcover with Dust Jacket. As seen on PBS. ... Fully and beautifully illustrated. Nice tight, clean, bright book. No remainder marks or other marks or stickers found. Gift Messaging available. Satisfaction guaranteed. Read more Show Less

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Overview

World-famous horse gentler Monty Roberts reveals the unique rapport he shares with one special horse: a wild mustang

In this beautifully illustrated book, Monty Roberts's be loved horse Shy Boy takes center stage. In a gripping, intimate narrative and in one hundred color photos, Monty Roberts relives their unique relationship, beginning with his first encounter with the wild horse in the high desert. During a dramatic three day ride across a hundred miles, Monty Roberts used all his skill to connect with the little mustang he finally befriended.

Throughout the year that followed, Shy Boy grew to love life on the farm, playfully demanding attention and becoming fascinated by children. During a year of challenges and one frightening illness, the wild horse earned the respect and admiration of his trainers—he had exceptional spirit. And, as his fame grew following the PBS-aired documentary that featured his initial three-day encounter with Monty Roberts, Shy Boy began to receive visitors from all over the world.

Yet throughout Shy Boy's year of fame, Monty Roberts was asked, "Would Shy Boy rather be free!" With trepidation, he took Shy Boy back to the wild to let him choose: Go with your herd, or stay with your gentler. What happened is so exciting and moving that it will surprise every reader.

And like Monty Roberts, readers will fall in love with Shy Boy.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

LA Times
Through trust, respect and negotiation, Roberts routinely will start a wild-eyed stallion to bridle, saddle and rider in about 30 minutes. If the understanding and conversations continue, the loyalty and mutual regard are forever.
Washington Post Book World
From those cold nights and blazing days in the desert, he would build a life anchored by his love and understanding of the horse.
Boston Globe
It's a magical dance between equal partners.
Forbes
Roberts turn[s] a dangerous bucking horse into a faithful follower without breaking its spirit.
Dallas Morning Sun
With his broad shoulders, deep chest and big hands, he could be an ol' boy from any well-managed ranch in West Texas. Instead he's a horseman from Salinas, California, who has shaken up the horse world with a simple message: Be gentle.
People Magazine
Monty Roberts trains horses using a language they understand--their own.
New York Times Book Review
Monty Roberts will soften you up, get you chewing and listening to his insights into equine behavior and make you marvel at the success of his spiritual quest.
Kirkus Reviews
Roberts (The Man Who Listens to Horses, 1997) deploys melodrama in the interest of common decency in this tale of gentling a wild mustang into the domesticated community of horses, then giving him a choice: stay with your new friends or run free to the herd. It is Roberts's wish to "make the world a better place for the horse—all horses, including free horses without names." He has made it his duty to show that the brutality typically employed to break a horse is simple cruelty, and there is a much kinder method. He calls it "joining up": forging a relationship of trust and generosity through communication and fair treatment. As ably spelled out here, this is achieved through a kindness of voice and touch, and a body language he calls Equus, "ingrained in the genetic, tribal memory of all the world's horses." To demonstrate that his technique can succeed even in the wide open spaces of the Sierra Nevada, he convinced the BBC to film him starting (Roberts' term for breaking) a mustang from the wild. So unfolds the story of Shy Boy, a creature Roberts paints as an American icon, noble and romantic in extremis: strong and free, wild and graceful and sensitive. Evidently stung by allegations that all was not kosher in his first book, Roberts, in an unappealing defensive tone, makes sure there are plenty of independent experts on hand to observe his every move as he and Shy Boy get to know each other; the book has nearly as many pages of photographs as text. Roberts takes detours in the book to excoriate abusers of humans and animals, before breathlessly, and hamfistedly, charging to the climactic moment when Shy Boy must choose between the herd and a home with Roberts.Roberts may be relentlessly self-righteous and not above going weepy to ingratiate himself with his readers, but his mission is too laudable to be ridiculed. (100 color photographs)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060194338
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 5/4/1999
  • Pages: 256
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.89 (d)

Meet the Author

Monty Roberts and his wife, Pat, live in California on their Flag Is Up Farms.

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Read an Excerpt

Shy Boy's Tribe

Wild horses have become living symbols--of liberty and beauty and power.

To appreciate Shy Boy, you must see him or his kind running, free and easy, in a wide-open space. To see what I mean, look at the photograph on pages 198-99: "Shy Boy enjoying a wild gallop on a spring morning."

A free horse running is a beautiful sight. The long tail high and proud. The mane rising and falling with his rolling step. Domestic horses striding in paddocks, without saddles and riders, are a pleasure to behold. But a mustang herd running through sagebrush, running just to feel the wind: that sight resonates in us all. I have seen it countless times and it always stirs my heart.

The magnificent herds of wild horses that once roamed the North American Plains in the millions no longer exist. Mustangs are somewhat rare now, and for that reason, cherished. Shy Boy and his tribe have become living symbols--of liberty and beauty and power.

To some extent we attach to the mustang the same characteristics we would like to see in ourselves: strong, wild at heart, sensitive, graceful--and above all, free. All over the world, people view the wild horse as a noble and romantic animal; in America, especially, the mustang is an icon.

The Lone Ranger's famous white horse, Silver, we were led to believe, was a mustang stallion wounded by a buffalo and then nursed back to health by the ranger. Old western films had cowboys coming to the rescue of wild horses, who paid them back by accepting the saddle and riding like the wind.

One automobile manufacturer even named a car after the mustang. The chrome silhouette of the galloping horse--not unlikethe image of Shy Boy on pages 198-99--was set in the car's front grill, and the car was pitched to a generation as small, fast, and youthful.

The odd thing is this: the romantic attachment to mustangs existed even in the minds of pioneers in the nineteenth century, when wild horses on the Plains were as common as sparrows. Matt Field, a traveler on the Santa Fe Trail in 1839, wrote after admiring one striking sorrel stallion that "a domestic horse will ever lack that magic and indescribable charm that beams like a halo around the simple name of freedom. . . . He was free, and we loved him for the very possession of that liberty we longed to take from him."

After the West had been settled, cattle arrived, fences went up, and the rich grasslands where the mustang roamed were no longer theirs. The herds sought refuge in higher, tougher ground. Ever since then there has been a pitched battle between those who want available land put to practical use (ranching and hunting) and those who want land set aside for the ever-diminishing herds of wild horses.

Shy Boy's ancestors have long been on the losing side of that old turf war. More than one million wild horses were captured by the government for use in World War I; hundreds of thousands more were taken to abattoirs and used in animal feeds; some were shot for sport. In one especially brutal killing in December 1998, thirty-four free-ranging horses in the foothills of the Virginia Range in Nevada were shot; it was clear from the aftermath that whoever did it meant for the horses to suffer and to die slowly. The atrocity made headlines around the world. In the West there was shock and outrage--on both sides of the mustang issue. A sacred line had been crossed. "It's like somebody desecrating the flag," one Nevada investigator said.

The mustang has become a kind of conscience of America. What we've done to horses has suddenly become a factor in our lives: the strong link between cruelty to animals and cruelty to people has been well documented.

It should not surprise that people feel the way they do about horses. No other animal in history has had more impact on our lives than the horse. Millions of horses gave their lives in our wars. They transported settlers in covered wagons across continents, delivered our mail, plowed our fields, cleared our lands, and entertained us with their athleticism on racetracks and show grounds. And during all this time they have provided faithful companionship.

Shy Boy's ancestors were brought to North America by Spanish conquistadors four centuries ago. In a way, this marked a homecoming for the horse. Horses and their ancestors had developed on this continent 55 million years before; from here they crossed land bridges into Asia and spread to Europe. By the time Columbus landed in North America, the indigenous horse had been extinct for almost fifteen thousand years. No one is really sure why they disappeared. Meanwhile, slowly but surely, Shy Boy's ancestors had circumnavigated the globe.

Horses abandoned or lost by Spanish cavalry, the troops of the conquistadors, and later by Spanish settlers were the forebears of the mustangs that colonized the wild heartland of the western United States. They were tough horses; they had to be to survive the grueling eight-week journey by ship to the Americas from Spain. Travel in those days was not for the fainthearted, animal or human.

Some believe that the "horse latitudes" (30 degrees north latitude--the Tropic of Cancer; 30 degrees south latitude--the Tropic of Capricorn), zones where ships were often becalmed, owe their names to this fact: when water ran out and horses on board died of thirst, they were tossed into the sea. The difficulties in transporting livestock across the ocean led the Spanish to establish horse-breeding farms in Cuba.

Once on land, the horses went to work--as warhorses. Hernando Cortez was recorded as saying that next to God, he owed victory to the horse. Horse and soldier climbed mountains, forded rivers and swamps, battled through impenetrable undergrowth, and fought indigenous peoples every step of the way. If the men were made of iron, the horses were forged of something even stronger.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

Shy Boy's Tribe

Wild horses have become living symbols — of liberty and beauty and power.

To appreciate Shy Boy, you must see him or his kind running, free and easy, in a wide-open space. To see what I mean, look at the photograph on pages 198-99: "Shy Boy enjoying a wild gallop on a spring morning."

A free horse running is a beautiful sight. The long tail high and proud. The mane rising and falling with his rolling step. Domestic horses striding in paddocks, without saddles and riders, are a pleasure to behold. But a mustang herd running through sagebrush, running just to feel the wind: that sight resonates in us all. I have seen it countless times and it always stirs my heart.

The magnificent herds of wild horses that once roamed the North American Plains in the millions no longer exist. Mustangs are somewhat rare now, and for that reason, cherished. Shy Boy and his tribe have become living symbols — of liberty and beauty and power.

To some extent we attach to the mustang the same characteristics we would like to see in ourselves: strong, wild at heart, sensitive, graceful — and above all, free. All over the world, people view the wild horse as a noble and romantic animal; in America, especially, the mustang is an icon.

The Lone Ranger's famous white horse, Silver, we were led to believe, was a mustang stallion wounded by a buffalo and then nursed back to health by the ranger. Old western films had cowboys coming to the rescue of wild horses, who paid them back by accepting the saddle and riding like the wind.

One automobile manufacturer even named a car after the mustang. The chrome silhouette of the galloping horse — not unlike the image of Shy Boy on pages 198-99 — was set in the car's front grill, and the car was pitched to a generation as small, fast, and youthful.

The odd thing is this: the romantic attachment to mustangs existed even in the minds of pioneers in the nineteenth century, when wild horses on the Plains were as common as sparrows. Matt Field, a traveler on the Santa Fe Trail in 1839, wrote after admiring one striking sorrel stallion that "a domestic horse will ever lack that magic and indescribable charm that beams like a halo around the simple name of freedom. . . . He was free, and we loved him for the very possession of that liberty we longed to take from him."

After the West had been settled, cattle arrived, fences went up, and the rich grasslands where the mustang roamed were no longer theirs. The herds sought refuge in higher, tougher ground. Ever since then there has been a pitched battle between those who want available land put to practical use ranching and hunting and those who want land set aside for the ever-diminishing herds of wild horses.

Shy Boy's ancestors have long been on the losing side of that old turf war. More than one million wild horses were captured by the government for use in World War I; hundreds of thousands more were taken to abattoirs and used in animal feeds; some were shot for sport. In one especially brutal killing in December 1998, thirty-four free-ranging horses in the foothills of the Virginia Range in Nevada were shot; it was clear from the aftermath that whoever did it meant for the horses to suffer and to die slowly. The atrocity made headlines around the world. In the West there was shock and outrage — on both sides of the mustang issue. A sacred line had been crossed. "It's like somebody desecrating the flag," one Nevada investigator said.

The mustang has become a kind of conscience of America. What we've done to horses has suddenly become a factor in our lives: the strong link between cruelty to animals and cruelty to people has been well documented.

It should not surprise that people feel the way they do about horses. No other animal in history has had more impact on our lives than the horse. Millions of horses gave their lives in our wars. They transported settlers in covered wagons across continents, delivered our mail, plowed our fields, cleared our lands, and entertained us with their athleticism on racetracks and show grounds. And during all this time they have provided faithful companionship.

Shy Boy's ancestors were brought to North America by Spanish conquistadors four centuries ago. In a way, this marked a homecoming for the horse. Horses and their ancestors had developed on this continent 55 million years before; from here they crossed land bridges into Asia and spread to Europe. By the time Columbus landed in North America, the indigenous horse had been extinct for almost fifteen thousand years. No one is really sure why they disappeared. Meanwhile, slowly but surely, Shy Boy's ancestors had circumnavigated the globe.

Horses abandoned or lost by Spanish cavalry, the troops of the conquistadors, and later by Spanish settlers were the forebears of the mustangs that colonized the wild heartland of the western United States. They were tough horses; they had to be to survive the grueling eight-week journey by ship to the Americas from Spain. Travel in those days was not for the fainthearted, animal or human.

Some believe that the "horse latitudes" 30 degrees north latitude — the Tropic of Cancer; 30 degrees south latitude — the Tropic of Capricorn, zones where ships were often becalmed, owe their names to this fact: when water ran out and horses on board died of thirst, they were tossed into the sea. The difficulties in transporting livestock across the ocean led the Spanish to establish horse-breeding farms in Cuba.

Once on land, the horses went to work — as warhorses. Hernando Cortez was recorded as saying that next to God, he owed victory to the horse. Horse and soldier climbed mountains, forded rivers and swamps, battled through impenetrable undergrowth, and fought indigenous peoples every step of the way. If the men were made of iron, the horses were forged of something even stronger.

Read More Show Less

Introduction

May 1999

Shy Boy Is Back

Monty Roberts wowed critics and horse lovers with his 1997 book, The Man Who Listens to Horses, which remained on the New York Times bestseller list for more than 54 weeks and has sold more than two million copies worldwide. Now, in Shy Boy: The Horse That Came in from the Wild, the real-life horse whisperer tells the intimate story of his unique relationship with a wild mustang named Shy Boy, his favorite horse. And Roberts is not alone in his love for Shy Boy: After the broadcast of a PBS program featuring the wild horse, Roberts and Shy Boy began to receive visitors from all over the world, and Shy Boy now gets more fan mail than the author does. After being asked countless times whether Shy Boy would rather be set free, Roberts did exactly that, letting the horse choose to go back into the wild or to stay with him. The horse's decision will delight all readers, not just animal lovers.

Filled with a hundred color photographs, Shy Boy will surprise and touch readers just as the horse has affected so many. Read an excerpt from Chapter 1 below.

Read More Show Less

Interviews & Essays

On Tuesday, May 11th, barnesandnoble.com welcomed Monty Roberts to discuss SHY BOY.

Moderator: It's our pleasure to welcome you to our Auditorium, Monty Roberts. How are you doing this evening?

Monty Roberts: I'm doing fine. I'm getting ready to do a signing, and I'm in San Francisco.


Martin Groeger from Pompey: Why did you write THE MAN WHO LISTENS TO HORSES in the first place?

Monty Roberts: I wrote THE MAN WHO LISTENS TO HORSES in the first place because Her Majesty, the Queen of England, said there needed to be a book. She said this needed to be saved for generations to come. Prior to this time, I had never considered writing a book and would have said that it was the last thing on the list.


Tammi Bihuniak from Nebraska: Did you ever expect your horse Shy Boy to be so famous and so popular? How is he dealing with the fame?

Monty Roberts: Well, no, I never expected him to be so famous or popular, but when you watch him, it seems as him he knew it all the time because he is loving the popularity. More people come by to visit the farm to see him than me. He acts as if he owns the farm, and he is rivaling Dually to be king of the hill.


Jackson from Middletown, CT: I'm confused.... Did Nicholas Evans contact you when he was writing THE HORSE WHISPERER? Are you the inspiration for that character? What did you think of the book and the movie?

Monty Roberts: Nicholas Evans contacted me at the very beginning of his writing of the novel THE HORSE WHISPERER. He got my videos and had long discussions with me but later sold it to become a movie and dramatically changed the character of the work. I did not like the message that the book or the movie sent to the public. In my opinion, the message was that violence works, and in my opinion, they put a white hat on brutality. I do not believe that any horses were hurt in the making of the movie; the American Humane Association was in charge, and I feel certain they took good care of the horses. My only regret is the message they sent.


Beadu from NYC: Hello, Monty Roberts. I heard a rumor that there is a PBS documentary that aired in conjunction with the release of this book. Is that true? What does the PBS documentary cover?

Monty Roberts: It is true, and it's "Shy Boy: The Horse That Came in from the Wild," and it is the story of giving him the chance to make the choice to go back to the wild or to come home with me. The three releases so far have shown it to be about three times more popular than the first piece.


Mercedes from Florida: Has your technique ever not worked? Aren't you scared you're going to get hurt?

Monty Roberts: I've done over 10,700 horses, and it has always worked. Some have been wonderful and some less wonderful, but it has always worked. Injury is always a possibility, but with my deep experience bank, I don't fear it.


Marc Osborne from Newtown, Pa: Is SHY BOY the follow-up to THE MAN WHO LISTENS TO HORSES?

Monty Roberts: It is. It essentially covers the major things that have happened with me since the publishing of the first book. I consider it a celebration of why the first book is passing 3.5 million copies worldwide.


Shep from Greenville: Why, exactly, are you against feeding a horse from your hand? You're giving them a treat. Horses don't see it that way?

Monty Roberts: I'm against feeding your horse from your hand because it creates many bad habits. The primary one is biting. Your dog and your cat (carnivores) consider food as a trophy because they have stalked and bagged it. No blade of grass has ever run from a horse. They never have stalked or bagged anything, and food is no reward.


Alison Balders from Chattanooga: The pictures in SHY BOY are beautiful. Do you have a favorite one in the book, and why is that one your favorite? Also, who takes these pictures?

Monty Roberts: My favorite in the book is Shy Boy running with all four feet off the ground. It's the one that my wife has sculpted, and you can find the sculpture and the picture in the book. Christopher Dydyk, the young man who took the pictures, is a tremendous talent. I found him while he was in college and assisted him in his career. I call him my Ansel Adams.


Crosby from Kansas City: Did you meet Queen Elizabeth II? What was that like? Have you gone riding with her?

Monty Roberts: Wow! Yes to all of the above. And it's clearly documented that I met her. I was with her last Easter Sunday. I went to church with her in the morning and spent time with her in the afternoon. I work with her horse people now more than her horses, but her endorsements of my work have obviously meant a great deal to me.


Jenna from Syracuse, New York: I have two questions: At what age do you recommend children begin horseback riding? I am pregnant now and want my future child to be a rider. Also, I am from a cold area. Is it safe for horses to ride outside when there's snow on the ground and it's very cold?

Monty Roberts: If conditions are right and a careful approach is used, riding at three and four years of age on the proper horse is not unsafe. However, safety is the single issue which stands alone at the top of the list when beginning the career of any rider, young or old. If not a professional, seek professional help. And all decisions such as surfaces in cold weather should be made with safety as the number one criteria.


Shauna from Saratoga Springs: Hello. Do I need to travel to the Flag Is Up ranch to learn how to apply the Join Up! technique? How do I find out about instructors who know about and use your technique?

Monty Roberts: No, you can go to England, which is just about as far for you. I'm sorry that I don't have more teachers. We're working on it. Stay logged onto www.montyroberts.com for information.


Max, Age 6 from Kentucky: What snacks does Shy Boy like? Apples? Carrots? Who watches him when you are away?

Monty Roberts: He lives with Phillipe when I'm away. And he likes his hay and his grain, and we try to keep anybody from giving him snacks, as it would only serve to spoil him. He's got a big enough head now. I want him to stay friendly with people.


Derek from Dallas: Could you please explain why the British version of the book has you going to Nevada with different people than the American version? And in SHY BOY, did you go to Nevada with that Carter couple? (I haven't read SHY BOY yet.)

Monty Roberts: The reason that the British version is different than the American version was that I was reminded by my relatives that, 50 years before, it was the Carters that went to Nevada with me and that the other people went to a different place with me. I had it mixed up, so I changed it at their request. Shy Boy has only been to Las Vegas with me for the National Finals Rodeo. He was captured by the BLM near Tonahpaw.


Jeff from Mendocino, CA: I am an instructor, and one of my students just bought a horse who refuses to move when she gets on him. He'll stand for a half an hour, until she gets tired and dismounts. Any suggestions? I know you probably need more details, but any guidance you could give me is appreciated. Thanks, Mr. Roberts.

Monty Roberts: No pain. If you use a soft rope, about four feet long, made of yarn -- soft threads -- and you use it over and under, left and right, it will encourage the horse to go forward without creating pain.


Susan Marmol from suzysunny@aol.com: I enjoyed your first book, as well the the PBS documentary. I am especially interested in your work with children. Do you plan to write a book describing your successes with so-called "difficult children?" I'd very much like to learn more about your methods in joining up with children in a manner similar to the way you work with horses. Thank you.

Monty Roberts: The book is about 80 percent complete. We're working feverishly on it now. It should be out next spring.


Summit Forst from Bedford: Do you and Shy Boy ever go through troublesome periods? How do you cope?

Monty Roberts: All relationships go through troublesome periods, but I cannot remember the time when I was angry with him. It's just a matter of using the principles of the language Equus, which simply do not generate anger or pain.


Charmer from Home: Do your powers work with other animals?

Monty Roberts: I don't know that I have any powers. I only discovered what nature already had in place. I've clearly documented my work with deer and somewhat with dogs and cats. My work with people is extensive, and I have written a bit on my work with some fish.


Teddy from Wilmington, NC: I saw this documentary once where they calmed wild horses down by surrounding them with grain in a container of some sort. Are you familiar with this technique and what do you think of it?

Monty Roberts: I'm familiar with it, and I believe it not to be something that I would endorse.


Betsi McKay from Durham, NC: To what extent do you believe communication with other species is possible? For example, psychic animal healers claim to receive mental images from the animal they are healing. Have you had similar experiences?

Monty Roberts: Nothing that I have done or am familiar with has anything to do with mystic or psychic powers. I'm not putting those things down, but I know nothing about them. Everything I do is solidly based in scientific fact.


Chad from England: When a horse dies, do you have a funeral? Do you bury or cremate the horse? Can you explain any rituals pertaining to the death of a horse?

Monty Roberts: I've had many quiet times over the death of horses that I loved. Brownie, Johnny Tivio, Nightmist, Julius Doll, to name a few. I believe that what you do at that time is a personal process. Be comfortable with whatever you choose.


Moderator: Please describe your ideal summer vacation. Thanks.

Monty Roberts: My ideal summer vacation is a week or so in the upper reaches of British Columbia with a fly rod, no barb on the hook, and the fish remain Canadian citizens.


Tara from Short Hills, NJ: Has Shy Boy ever fathered a horse?

Monty Roberts: When I adopted Shy Boy, he had been gelded, branded, and inoculated by the BLM. To my knowledge, he's never sired another horse.


Carmella Rodgers from Jacksonville: Do you see any more television appearances in Shy Boy's future?

Monty Roberts: I don't know about that. In my work, television appearances are requested rather than contrived, so it would be up to television documentary people as to whether they see any future air time for him.


Jennifer Hoffman from Anderson, SC: Caught your seminar at the Garrison Arena, Clemson, SC.... What a night to remember! Of course, I bought your book (autographed) and loved it! I find that there are too many people in this world that do not respect and love animals like you and I do! And I feel sorry for them and what they are missing! I am very proud of you, for what you have learned, what you are helping others to learn, and what you have done for horses and all other animals! Best wishes!

Monty Roberts: Thank you very much for your vote of confidence. I need a lot of help. I will keep working, but the world needs to rise up against violence to people or animals.


Pam Roodin from Kansas: My daughter fell off her horse and is now scared to get back on. I think she should just conquer her fears. What do you think?

Monty Roberts: Sure she should. She should get with some good professional help and ride a safe horse in a very safe place and gradually get her confidence back.


Elaine S. from Philadelphia: I'm thinking about becoming a foster parent and was inspired by your story. Could you tell me why you didn't go through the "system" to get your kids? And if I wanted to follow in your shoes, how do I put the word out that I'll take these types of kids into my home. (i.e. How'd you get the word around?)

Monty Roberts: I got the word around because I gained a reputation while I was in college working with families in my psychology classes. I didn't go through the system because I felt safer continuing my relationship with the children long-term with agreements from the parents.


Laura from Illinois: I've just started reading SHY BOY. Wasn't it scary to go all by yourself out on the Nevada desert? Who were your friends that you went to Nevada with? Weren't they scared too?

Monty Roberts: Sometimes I was frightened when I was very young, but I felt confident with my horses, and I don't think fear was a major factor for any of us.


Moderator: Thank you for chatting with us this evening, Monty Roberts. Do you have any parting words for your online audience?

Monty Roberts: Yes, I do. I would like my online fans to realize that my life's goal is to leave the world a better place than I found it for horses and people. I believe that no one of us was born with the right to say "you must or I'll hurt you" to any creature, animal or human. Thank you very much.


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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2003

    EXCELLENT page turner!!!!!

    This book is extremely good. It is well written and the pictures really help to explain Monty Roberts' work. It is explained in great detail how Monty Roberts tried to work with Shy Boy. You can definetely notice the hard times he had to go through with the horse. The ending is the best part!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 3, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    LOVED IT!!!!!

    Monty Roberts is an amazing man and healer! It is a wonderful journey for both man and beast with a great feel good ending and its all true!!! A must read!!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2003

    Wonderful

    This book was beautifully written. I highly recomend this book to anyone who would like to enjoy a good story and journey. Also the pictures were breathtaking.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2003

    Wild!

    I loved this book! I think it really helped me appriciate the American mustang, and all its beauty. If you love horses, you will love this book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2000

    Wonderful story

    Easy to read,hard to put down. A must read for horse people,or not. Very inspiring book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2009

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2010

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    Posted January 31, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 10, 2010

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    Posted May 22, 2009

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