Shylock's Children / Edition 1

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Overview

Throughout much of European history, Jews have been strongly associated with commerce and the money trade, rendered both visible and vulnerable, like Shakespeare's Shylock, by their economic distinctiveness. Shylock's Children tells the story of Jewish perceptions of this economic difference and its effects on modern Jewish identity. Derek Penslar explains how Jews in modern Europe developed the notion of a distinct "Jewish economic man," an image that grew ever more complex and nuanced between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780520225909
  • Publisher: University of California Press
  • Publication date: 7/1/2001
  • Series: Ahmanson-Murphy Fine Arts Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 390
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Derek J. Penslar is Samuel Zacks Associate Professor of Jewish History at the University of Toronto and author of Zionism and Technocracy: The Engineering of Jewish Settlement in Palestine 1870-1918 (1991). He coedited
In Search of Jewish Community: Jewish Identities in Germany and Austria, 1918-1933
(1998).

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
1 Jews, Paupers, and Other Savages: The Economic Image of the Jew in Western Europe, 1648-1848 11
Economic Antisemitism in Historical Perspective 13
Moralism, Mercantilism, and Cameralism 23
The Jew as Pauper 35
The Jew as Savage 38
The Jew as Master 42
2 The Origins of Jewish Political Economy, 1648-1848 50
Judaism and Economics 52
Mercantilism and Jewish Modernity 59
Educating Shylock: Economics in the German Haskalah 68
Economics in the Eastern European Haskalah 81
From the Periphery to the Center: Political Economy in German Jewish Social Thought, 1815-1848 84
3 The Origins of Modern Jewish Philanthropy, 1789-1860 90
Rationality, Morality, and Philanthropy 92
The Theory and Practice of Jewish Productivization 107
4 Homo economicus judaicus and the Spirit of Capitalism, 1848-1914 124
Economic Mobility 126
Abnormality and Distinctiveness 134
Gentile Visions of Homo economicus judaicus 138
Burghers of the Mosaic Persuasion 144
Wirtschaft and Wissenschaft: Economics and Jewish Historiography 158
5 Solving the "Jewish Problem": Jewish Social Policy, 1860-1933 174
The Communal Arena: From Philanthropy to Social Welfare 176
Jewish Social Policy and Bourgeois Social Reform 185
The National Arena: Jewish Immigration Policy 195
"Productivization": Apologetic, Romantic, or Realistic? 205
Social Policy and Jewish Social Science 216
The Birth of Sociological Judaism 219
6 From Social Policy to Social Engineering, 1870-1933 223
Zionism as a Form of International Jewish Politics 225
Jewish Social Policy in Palestine 232
Colonization as Social Engineering 238
Epilogue 255
Notes 263
Bibliography 329
Index 359
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