Sick and Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired: Living with Invisible Chronic Illness
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Sick and Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired: Living with Invisible Chronic Illness

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by Paul J. Donoghue, Mary E. Siegel
     
 

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Unlike a leg in a cast, invisible chronic illness (ICI) has no observable symptoms.
Consequently, people who suffer from chronic fatigue, chronic pain, and many other miseries often endure not only the ailment but dismissive and negative reactions from others. Since its first publication, Sick and Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired has offered hope and coping

Overview

Unlike a leg in a cast, invisible chronic illness (ICI) has no observable symptoms.
Consequently, people who suffer from chronic fatigue, chronic pain, and many other miseries often endure not only the ailment but dismissive and negative reactions from others. Since its first publication, Sick and Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired has offered hope and coping strategies to thousands of people who suffer from ICI. Paul Donoghue and Mary Siegel teach their readers how to rethink how they themselves view their illness and how to communicate with loved ones and doctors in a way that meets their needs. The authors' understanding makes readers feel they have been heard for the first time. For this edition, the authors include a new introduction drawing on the experiences of the many people who have responded to the book and to their lectures and television appearances. They expand the definition of ICI to include other ailments such as depression, addiction, and obsessive-compulsive disorders. They bring the resource material, including Web sites, up to the present, and they offer fresh insights on four topics that often emerge: guilt, how ICI affects the family, meaningfulness, and defining acceptance.

Editorial Reviews

Allergy Aware
One of the most helpful books about chronic illness that I ever run across....This book is captivating, informative, and sensitive.
Network
How many times have you said to yourself, 'No one can understand how I feel unless they've experienced it themselves?' Because the authors of this book each have experienced an 'Invisible Chronic Illness' or ICI, they are able to express feelings that you have more than likely experienced but have not been able to put into words. This book validates your emotions and then helps you to express them in constructive ways.
Ostomy/Wound Management
This self-help book by two Ph.D. psychologists (one of whom suffers from multiple sclerosis) is not new, just new to me, and what a discovery! It is a moving explication of what it means to live with an invisible chronic illness--ICI. If you have patients, acquaintances or if you yourself suffer from an ICI you can find valuable advice and guidance in this book.
Library Journal
Donoghue and Siegel direct their book to healthcare providers, families, and patients dealing with invisible chronic illness (ICI)--those conditions that are chronic and disabling but not readily apparent to the casual observer. In Part 1, the authors define ICI, including brief descriptions of 13 diseases that fit their criteria. They discuss in clinical, detached language the impact of ICI on the patient, family, friends, and employers. In Part 2, Donoghue and Siegel speak directly to the patient, offering coping mechanisms to enhance quality of life through positive thinking, effective communication, and pain management techniques. They also include reading lists and ``Illness Associations.'' While useful, their book suffers from the attempt to address too broad an audience. Recommended for larger collections only.-- Janet M. Schneider, James A. Haley Veterans Hosp., Tampa, Fla.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393320657
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
09/28/2000
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
306
Sales rank:
331,922
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 8.30(h) x 0.80(d)

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What People are saying about this

Katherina Dalton
An invaluable source of help and comfort to those who suffer from invisible chronic illness and to their caregivers and friends.

Meet the Author

Paul J. Donoghue, S.M., Ph.D., is a psychologist in private practice in Stamford, Connecticut.

Mary E. Siegel, Ph.D., is a psychologist in private practice in Stamford, Connecticut.

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Sick and Tired of Feeling Sick and Tired: Living with Invisible Chronic Illness 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Catherine_D More than 1 year ago
I love these authors! This book is easy to read, absorbing, and enlightening.  I had several lasting revelations from "Sick and Tired ..." that I refer to many years after having read it the first time. The joyful,  sensitive, and wise characters of the authors exudes from theses pages. I also give the book as gifts with much confidence it will be received with  gratitude and helpful to the reader. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this book in the hopes of finding some way to remind myself and others that even though my illness isn't visible, I still suffer. I feel like if I bring up my illness to explain why I can't do such simple things that I look like a whiner. I'm embarrassed by my "invisible illness". This book had a heavy biblical leaning that I was uncomfortable, which I don't understand since I am a Christian. I just didn't enjoy the book or get anything useful out of it and I can't really say why.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a support group facilitator for women living with chronic illnesses and I myself have been living with Lupus for sixteen years. I often refer to this book when facilitating my group, or for personal growth and encouragement.
Guest More than 1 year ago
During 25 years of practice in clinical psychology I have found few books as helpful as this one. It does what I have always held to be the central ideal of my work: to combine compassion and encouragement with creative guidelines and practical information. Besides illuminating the physical, emotional, and social consequences of baffling chronic illnesses, the book so successfully describes creative responses to emotional challenges that I recommend it to my physically healthy patients who have found it a valuable resource in their search for improved personal communication, deeper self-acceptance, and creativity. As one of my chronically ill patients described the book: 'It's like a great reference book for the ill and a guide for healthy living, in one.'