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Sign Language Interpreting: Its Art and Science / Edition 1
     

Sign Language Interpreting: Its Art and Science / Edition 1

by David Stewart, Jerome Schein, Brenda Cartwright
 

ISBN-10: 0205275400

ISBN-13: 9780205275403

Pub. Date: 04/22/1998

Publisher: Pearson

Sign Language Interpreting is designed to bridge the gap between those who know and use sign, those who do not, those who interpret, and those who administer and finance interpreting programs. This book reflects the recent and revolutionary changes in policy and practices affecting deaf people. With particular attention given to interpreting in the

Overview

Sign Language Interpreting is designed to bridge the gap between those who know and use sign, those who do not, those who interpret, and those who administer and finance interpreting programs. This book reflects the recent and revolutionary changes in policy and practices affecting deaf people. With particular attention given to interpreting in the United States and Canada, this book reports on the extent of, and specific changes in, the conditions for deaf people in North America and around the world. Readers are taken on a journey from the early days of interpreting, to the professionalization of interpreters, to an examination of past and present models of interpreting. Two new models are introduced that take into account the influence of all participants and environmental factors in a variety of interpreting situations. The business and ethical aspects of interpreting are discussed while focusing on current practice. Many issues related to interpreting are too often not taught in school and left to deaf people to learn from experience. This book reflects an ongoing effort to address many of those issues. It also serves as a guide to further explorations of the cultures of deaf and non-deaf people, economics, the process of interpretation, linguistics, physiology, psychology, sociology, and even politics-all having baring on the interactions that take place when a sign language interpreter intervenes in the communication process. Anyone who has an interest in, is affected by, or knows someone who is hearing impaired. Also appropriate for legislators, program administrators, agencies that underwrite interpreting, and those whose facilities and services accommodatedeaf people.A Longwood Professional Book

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780205275403
Publisher:
Pearson
Publication date:
04/22/1998
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
274
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.74(d)

Table of Contents

Preface ix(4)
About the Authors xiii
1 Introduction
1(11)
Our Philosophy
2(3)
Terminology
5(1)
Some Professional Issues
5(4)
Organization of the Book
9(3)
2 From Favor to Profession: The History of Interpreting
12(19)
When and Where Did Interpreting Originate?
12(1)
The Professionalization of Interpreting
13(1)
Interpreting with Deaf Participants
13(3)
Interpreter Organizations
16(4)
Social and Legal Milestones
20(6)
Preparation of Interpreters
26(2)
Interpreting in Other Countries
28(1)
Nurturing the Interpreting Profession
29(2)
3 Models of Interpreting
31(28)
The Cognitive Model of Interpreting
31(2)
Models versus Theories
33(1)
The Interactive Model of Interpreting
34(8)
Other Models of Interpreting
42(11)
Sign Language and Other Forms of Interpreting
53(2)
Conclusions
55(4)
4 Physical Factors
59(15)
The Auditory Field
59(1)
The Visual Field
60(7)
Personal Factors
67(4)
Managing the Environment
71(3)
5 Psychological Factors
74(24)
The Psychology of the Interpreter
74(8)
Psychology of Deaf Participants
82(8)
Psychology of Nondeaf Participants
90(1)
Psychology of Interpreting Interactions
91(2)
Psychological Research
93(4)
Summary
97(1)
6 Varieties of Settings
98(28)
Variations in Form and Participants
98(9)
Variations in Settings
107(17)
Summary
124(2)
7 Language and Culture
126(17)
Respecting Other Cultures
127(1)
Using New Signs
128(1)
Cultural Misinterpretations
129(2)
Language as Power
131(1)
The Interpreter's Responsibilities
132(1)
Cultural Mediation
133(1)
American Sign Language
134(3)
English-Based Sign Systems
137(1)
The Interpreter's Linguistic Tools
137(4)
Summary
141(2)
8 The Business of Interpreting
143(23)
Supply and Demand
143(3)
Projecting Demand
146(3)
Other Demands
149(1)
Negative Influences on Demand
149(1)
The Supply
150(2)
Remuneration
152(2)
Trends in Fees
154(2)
Marketing Interpreter Services
156(1)
Consumer Education
157(1)
Certification and Licensure
158(3)
Malpractice
161(1)
Cost-Benefit Analyses
162(1)
An Innovative Marketing Plan
162(1)
Summary
163(3)
9 Ethics
166(23)
The RID Code of Ethics
166(17)
Breaking the Code
183(2)
Uncharted Ethics
185(2)
Summary
187(2)
10 Educational Interpreting
189(27)
Educational Placement before and after P.L. 94-142
189(2)
The Role of Educational Interpreters
191(4)
Educational Levels
195(5)
Communication Decisions
200(5)
Working Conditions
205(5)
Supply and Demand
210(1)
Legal Aspects
211(1)
The Research Basis
212(2)
Summary
214(2)
11 The Future
216(11)
Demand
216(2)
Remote Interpreting
218(1)
Alternatives to Sign Language Interpreting
219(2)
Supply
221(1)
Research
222(1)
Trends in Educational Interpreting
223(1)
Interpreter Demographics
224(1)
Participant Characteristics
224(1)
Ethics
225(1)
The Coming Consensus
226(1)
Appendixes 227(16)
A Interpreter and Transliterator Certifications 227(5)
B Ethically Challenging Scenarios 232(6)
C Encounters with Reality: A Collection of Sign Language Interpreter Stories 238(5)
References and Bibliography 243(22)
Index 265

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