Signaling Mechanisms in Protozoa and Invertebrates

Overview

The striking similarities between elements of the mammalian endocrine systems and those of protozoans and invertebrates mean that research which is more easily carried out on simpler organisms has considerable significance for the study of endocrinology in higher organisms. Starting with the presence of hormones and development and function of receptors in protozoa, through the second messenger systems, GPI-expression, signal recognition and pheromone function, the authors demonstrate the universality of basic ...
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Overview

The striking similarities between elements of the mammalian endocrine systems and those of protozoans and invertebrates mean that research which is more easily carried out on simpler organisms has considerable significance for the study of endocrinology in higher organisms. Starting with the presence of hormones and development and function of receptors in protozoa, through the second messenger systems, GPI-expression, signal recognition and pheromone function, the authors demonstrate the universality of basic endocrine mechanisms of the living world, as well as the specialities at lower phylogenetic levels. This book is useful not only for physiologists and endocrinologists, protozoologists and invertebrate zoologists, but also for biologists interested in the study or wonder of evolution.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Seven survey reviews in the field of structure-associated genetic and epigenetic functional process cover: association of DNA with nuclear matrix; nuclear import in vitro; cytoplasmic assembly and nuclear transport of the snRNP particles; the centrosome; role of nonsense, frameshift, and missense suppressor tRNAs in mammalian cells; UAG suppressor Glutamine tRNA in uninfected and retrovirus-infected mammalian cells; and essential genes for development of Dictyostelium. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783642801082
  • Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
  • Publication date: 7/31/2012
  • Series: Progress in Molecular and Subcellular Biology Series , #17
  • Edition description: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1996
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 212
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.49 (d)

Table of Contents

Evolutionary Significance of the Hormone Recognition Capacity in Unicellular Organisms. Development of Hormone Receptors.- 1 Introduction.- 2 Receptor Memory: Hormonal Imprinting.- 3 Problems of the Specificity of Imprinting.- 4 Time, Concentration, and Downregulation.- 5 Sugars of the Receptors.- 6 Cell Aging and Imprinting.- 7 Imprinting by Amino Acids and Oligopeptides.- 8 Receptors of the Nuclear Envelope.- 9 Possible Mechanisms of Imprinting.- 10 The Other Component: Hormones in Protozoa.- 11 Evolutionary Conclusions Based on the Unicellular Model.- References.- Studies on the Opioid Mechanism in Tetrahymena.- 1 Introduction to Opioid Mechanisms.- 1.1 Opioid Mechanisms in Invertebrate Metazoa.- 1.2 Opioid Mechanisms in Unicellular Organisms.- 2 The Opioid Mechanism in Tetrahymena.- 2.1 Pharmacological Characterization of the Endogenous Opioid.- 2.2 Pharmacological Characterization of the Opioid Receptor.- 2.3 Biochemical Characterization of the Signal Transduction Pathway.- 3 Conclusions.- References.- Adenylate and Guanylate Cyclases in Tetrahymena.- 1 Introduction.- 2 Cyclic Nucleotide Metabolism in Tetrahymena.- 2.1 Cell Growth- and Cycle-Associated Changes.- 2.2 Involvement in Biological Regulation.- 3 Cyclases Involved in Cell Metabolism and Functions.- 4 Regulatory Mechanisms of Cyclases.- 4.1 Adenylate Cyclase.- 4.2 Guanylate Cyclase.- 5 Structure and Intracellular Distribution of Calmodulin.- 6 Conclusion.- References.- Signal Peptide-Induced Sensory Behavior in Free Ciliates: Bioassays and Cellular Mechanisms.- 1 Introduction.- 2 Peptide Signals in Ciliates.- 2.1 Signal Peptides Found Intracellularly.- 2.2 Signal Peptides Having Sensory Effects.- 2.2.1 Physiological Effects of Insulin on Tetrahymena.- 3 Bioassays Measuring Peptide-Induced Changes of Cell Behavior and Ciliary Activity.- 3.1 Population Assays for Chemoattraction.- 3.2 Single Cell Assays for Chemoattraction.- 3.3 Assays of Ciliary Activity.- 4 Cellular Mechanisms Related to Peptide Action on Individual Cell Behavior.- 4.1 Adaptation.- 4.2 Persistence.- 5 Concluding Remarks.- References.- Ciliate Pheromones.- 1 Introduction.- 2 Background.- 3 Pheromone Notation and Origin.- 4 Pheromone Secretion and Purification.- 5 Pheromone Structure.- 6 Pheromone Genes.- 7 Pheromone Receptors.- 8 Competitive Pheromone Receptor-Binding Reactions.- 9 Pheromones as Growth Factors.- 10 Concluding Remarks.- References.- Cell-Surface GPI Expression in Protozoa. The Connection with the PI System.- 1 Introduction.- 1.1 The GPI Anchor.- 1.2 The GPI Anchor Biosynthesis.- 1.3 Enzymes with Specificities for GPI Anchors.- 1.4 The Inositol Phospholipids and Signal Transduction.- 2 The Cell-Surface Expression of GPI-Anchored Proteins in the Protozoa.- 2.1 GPI-Anchored Proteins in the Parasitic Protozoa.- 2.2 GPI-Anchored Proteins in the Free-Living Protozoa.- 3 Inositol Phospholipids in Tetrahymena pyriformis. The Possible Link Between the PI System and Synthesis of GPI.- References.- Cell Adhesion Proteins in the Nonvertebrate Eukaryotes.- 1 Introduction.- 1.1 History and Philosophy.- 1.2 Evolution.- 2 Approaches and Findings.- 3 Protista.- 3.1 Trypanosoma cruzi.- 3.2 Cellular Slime Molds.- 4 Higher Eukaryotes.- 5 An Alveolate: Plasmodium.- 6 Plants.- 6.1 Chlamydomonas.- 6.2 Volvox.- 6.3 Higher Plants.- 7 Fungi.- 7.1 Saccharomyces cerevisiae.- 7.2 Candida.- 8 Metazoa.- 8.1 Sponges.- 8.2 Cnidaria: Hydra.- 8.3 Tripoblasts.- 8.3.1 Pseudocoelatomates: Caenorhabditis elegans.- 8.4 Insects.- 8.5 Deuterostomes.- 8.5.1 Fertilization in Sea Urchins.- 9 Conclusions.- 10 Characteristics of Cell Adhesion Proteins.- 10.1 Modules.- 10.2 Cell Surface Association.- 10.3 Role of Ca2+.- 10.4 Binding Characteristics.- 11 Extracellular Matrix Interactions.- 12 Role of Lectins and Carbohydrates.- 13 Signal Transduction and Cytoplasmic Domains.- References.- Animal Lectins as Cell Surface Receptors: Current Status for Invertebrate Species.- 1 Introduction.- 2 Animal Lectins as Cell Membrane Receptors.- 3 Lectin Families in Invertebrate and Prohordate Species. Their Association with the Hemocyte Plasma Membrane.- 4 Summary and Prospects.- References.- Characterization of the Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinase Gene from the Marine Sponge Geodia cydonium.- 1 Introduction.- 2 Protein Kinases.- 3 Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases.- 4 Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinase from the Sponge Geodia cydonium.- 4.1 Ligand-Binding Domain (Immunoglobulin-Like Domain).- 4.2 Intron/Exon.- 4.3 Transmembrane Domain.- 4.4 Juxtamembrane Region.- 4.5 Catalytic Domain.- 4.6 3?-Nontranslated Region.- 5 Proposed Function of the Sponge Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinase.- 6 Implication for Molecular Evolution of Metazoa.- 7 Summary and Perspectives.- References.
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