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Signaling Pathways In Liver Diseases

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Overview

Recent advances have carried hepatology to new frontiers. The increasing frequency with which steatotic and cirrhotic livers undergo surgery obliges liver surgeons and hepatologists to understand the molecular mechanisms at play in these situations. Comprehension of the signaling pathways participating in liver regeneration, hepatocellular apoptosis and ischemia/reperfusion injury is essential. This book serves as a source of information to facilitate the reading of the literature and the planning of trials. Translational medicine implies knowledge of the molecular targets of novel therapeutic strategies. It is our goal to stimulate more research that can lead to more exchanges between the laboratory, the clinical ward and the operating room.
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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Willem J de Villiers, MD, PhD, MHCM (University of Kentucky College of Medicine)
Description: There have been numerous recent developments as far as complexity and novelty are concerned in cellular and extracellular signaling pathways in liver diseases. These exciting concepts have led to new opportunities for innovative treatments but the rapid discovery and intricate nature of these pathways and their interactions have overwhelmed clinicians. This compilation is an attempt to summarize recent knowledge and to provide a context for translational medicine to identify targets for novel therapies.
Purpose: This book wishes to disseminate new knowledge regarding liver signaling pathways and their interactions in an attempt to intensify research exchange between bench and bedside. It is a courageous effort but falls short due to lack of sufficient clinical input. In its current form, the book will appeal mainly to basic researchers.
Audience: It is aimed at both basic and clinical scientists who are involved in liver and biliary research. This is a very limited group and the specific aim is to spread recent knowledge to encourage translational research in innovative therapeutic strategies. The audience will be predominantly basic researchers, while clinical researchers will at most sample some of the abundant fare on offer. The truly international group of authors includes all credible authorities in their respective fields.
Features: The book is divided in three parts containing 35 chapters. In Part I, the different hepatic cell types and matrix are covered. In this section I enjoyed the succinct but pithy chapter on Kupffer cells. Part II has 27 chapters on different interacting hepatic signaling pathways ranging from interferon signaling, CD14 and Toll receptors, Wnt/beta-catenin pathway, PPAR pathway, nitric oxide, apoptosis and mitochondria, NF-kappa B and the role of ceramide in cell regulation. The chapter on Fas/FasL signaling is especially enjoyable. In part III, the areas of pharmacogenomics and proteomics are briefly explored. The book is beautifully produced and duplication is avoided as much as possible. A shortcoming is the relative lack of clinical relevance in many of the described pathways.
Assessment: This attractive compilation attempts to enlighten basis and clinical liver scientists about recent developments in liver signaling pathways. The chapters are comprehensive, but generally short and well written. Those clinicians who are willing to set sail on this sea of interacting signaling pathways will certainly catch enticing glimpses of the promised land of future innovative therapies.

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783540229346
  • Publisher: Springer-Verlag New York, LLC
  • Publication date: 6/16/2009
  • Pages: 464
  • Product dimensions: 1.00 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 10.00 (d)

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Hepatocytes 3
Ch. 2 Signaling pathways in biliary epithelial cells 17
Ch. 3 Stellate cells 27
Ch. 4 Kupffer cells 45
Ch. 5 Hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells 53
Ch. 6 Extracellular matrix 63
Ch. 7 IL-6/gp130/Stat3 77
Ch. 8 Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling 91
Ch. 9 Insulin pathway 105
Ch. 10 Nature and function of hepatic tumor necrosis factor-[alpha] signaling 115
Ch. 11 The Fas/FasL signaling pathway 129
Ch. 12 TGF-[beta] and the smad pathway in liver fibrogenesis 139
Ch. 13 Interferon signaling 151
Ch. 14 CD14 and toll receptor 165
Ch. 15 The Wnt/[beta]-catenin pathway 173
Ch. 16 Notch signaling in liver disease 193
Ch. 17 Extracellular ATP : emerging roles of purinergic signaling 201
Ch. 18 Calcium signaling 211
Ch. 19 MAP kinase pathways in the control of hepatocyte growth, metabolism and survival 223
Ch. 20 PI3K, PTEN and Akt 239
Ch. 21 TOR signaling and cell growth control 259
Ch. 22 Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors 267
Ch. 23 Transcriptional response to cAMP in the liver 281
Ch. 24 Heme oxygenase system 291
Ch. 25 Nitric oxide 299
Ch. 26 Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signaling system 311
Ch. 27 Cyclins and CDKs in liver diseases 325
Ch. 28 Telomeres and telomerase : distinctive roles in liver regeneration, cirrhosis and carcinogenesis 333
Ch. 29 NK-[kappa]B 341
Ch. 30 Ceramide : cell regulation from a lipid perspective 353
Ch. 31 Apoptosis and mitochondria 367
Ch. 32 Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the pathogenesis of liver disease 377
Ch. 33 Biological clock in the liver 391
Ch. 34 Pharmacogenomics of cholestatic liver disease 407
Ch. 35 Proteomics of signal transduction pathways 417
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