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Signs of Life: The Letters of Hilde Verdoner-Sluizer from Nazi Transit Camp, Westerbork, 1942 to 1944
     

Signs of Life: The Letters of Hilde Verdoner-Sluizer from Nazi Transit Camp, Westerbork, 1942 to 1944

by Hilde Verdoner-Sluizer, Jacob Boas (Foreword by), Yoka Verdoner (Editor), Francisca Verdoner Kan (Editor)
 
An intensely personal account of life in a Nazi camp in Holland from which trains carried Dutch Jews to their death in the extermination camps of Eastern Europe. These eloquent letters were written by a thirty-three-year-old housewife and mother of three young children, ages three, five, and eight. Her husband, also in hiding, urges her again and again to escape by

Overview

An intensely personal account of life in a Nazi camp in Holland from which trains carried Dutch Jews to their death in the extermination camps of Eastern Europe. These eloquent letters were written by a thirty-three-year-old housewife and mother of three young children, ages three, five, and eight. Her husband, also in hiding, urges her again and again to escape by means of his contacts with the underground. Hilde faces the terrible dilemma of staying or escaping at the price of certain reprisal to her parents, in-laws and brother. Hilde's letters reflect her initial denial of the reality of what was happening to a final understanding of her fate.

"The story of the Holocaust is the of millions of Jews life the author of these letters, ordinary people who are seldom heard from... To read Signs of Life is to experience the Holocaust at ground level".

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal - Library Journal
Westerbork was a holding station in the Netherlands for Jews and other ``undesirables'' before they were sent off to be gassed in Auschwitz and other camps. Verdoner-Sluizer was a brave woman who was sent to her death in February 1944 at Auschwitz. Her letters are filled with concern for her parents, family, and friends. Her husband and three children managed to survive in hiding (the collection is edited by Hilde's daughters). Jacob Boas of the Holocaust Center of Northern California states in the forward that Hilde represents ``the voice of the average Jew.'' Hilde is not philosophical; her concerns are practical. Altogether this is a very moving book, though rather slow reading. Recommended for libraries with extensive Holocaust or Judaica collections.-- Paul Kaplan, Highland Park P.L., Ill.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780874919554
Publisher:
Acropolis Books, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/13/1990
Pages:
223

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